Catalogue


Shaggy [electronic resource] : dogamuffin style /
by Micah Locilento.
imprint
[Toronto, Ont.] : ECW Press, c2002.
description
194 p. : col. ill.
ISBN
1550225235 :, 9781550225235
format(s)
Book
Subjects
personal subject
genre index term
More Details
imprint
[Toronto, Ont.] : ECW Press, c2002.
isbn
1550225235 :
9781550225235
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10526481
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 172-182).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Micah Locilento is a writer and editor living in Montreal, Quebec. An avid reggae fan, collector, and DJ, his interest in the music has inspired an enthusiasm for all forms of West Indian cultural production
First Chapter
Selling ten million records is a rare feat for any recording artist in the U.S., but even more of an achievement for an artist with a distinctive foreign accent. Since he burst on the scene in 1992, Shaggy's Jamaican accent and unique vocal style has demonstrated an immensely marketable quality. Because of Shaggy's pop appeal, reggae "purists" often deem his music far too commercial. But does it take a commercial mind or a unique visionary to transform a Jamaican tune from the 60s, into "Oh Carolina," a blockbuster hit that reaches number one in ten countries?

Other reggae fans argue that Shaggy's sound is too Americanized. You can't expect an artist living in Brooklyn, New York, to sound like he's straight out of Kingston, Jamaica, but instead, the combination of cultures creates an exciting, hybrid sound. By displaying his personality and musically asserting his distinctly Jamaican-American identity, Shaggy has done something that eluded even Bob Marley throughout his distinguished career: he attained a multi-million selling, number one hit in America, with "Boombastic" in 1995.

While Shaggy has unabashedly injected popular American musical elements into reggae, more significantly, Shaggy's Jamaican sensibility has been accepted by the masses of American pop fans. As a result, Shaggy continues to conquer the American charts and, most recently, sold more records in 2001 than several of America's top-selling pop icons combined. There's no denying that in the 21st century, Shaggy is the definitive Jamaican accent in American music culture.
Summaries
Main Description
Publication date scheduled to coincide with Shaggy's tour taking place in November 2002. 'First and foremost I am a reggae artist,' insists Shaggy. Born Orville Richard Burrell, the mulit-platinum pop icon is a worldwide ambassador for reggae, but few know just how connected Shaggy is with Jamaican music. Delving into the musical trends that have evolved during Shaggy's formative years, the popularity of sound system 'deejays' and the influence of both 1970's reggae and Bob Marley, Locilento provides and insight into Shaggy's unique sound.
Main Description
Shaggy, born Orville Richard Burrell, has had hit singles in more than nine countries, making him the most popular reggae act since Bob Marley. This biography features conversations with family and friends and exposes the man behind the microphone, from his childhood in Kingston, Jamaica, and his teen years in the seedy dance halls of Brooklyn to his stint in the United States Marines during the Gulf War and his early struggles to launch his career. Shaggy's musical influences are traced, illustrating how he has stayed true to his unique vocal style over the years. His latest successes, including his historic deal with Virgin Records and the founding of his own label, indicate that reggae's brightest star will be shining for many years to come.
Unpaid Annotation
"First and foremost, I am a reggae artist," insists Shaggy. Born Orville Richard Burrell, the multi-platinum pop icon is a worldwide ambassador forreggae, but few know just how connected Shaggy is with the sound of Jamaican rhythms. Shaggy: Dogamuffin Style details the rise of a superstar from Kingston, Jamaica, to his teen years in Flatbush, Brooklyn, to his time spent in the Marines during the Gulf War, while at the same time introducing the reader to the fascinating history and rich culture of reggae music. Delving into the musical trends in Jamaica during Shaggy's formative years, the popularity of soundsystem "deejays" (the Jamaican equivalent of rap MCs), and the influence of both 1970s reggae and Bob Marley, Locilento provides an insight into Shaggy's unique sound. Although most, if not all,journalists label him a rapper, Shaggy:Dogamuffin Style reveals not only Shaggy's reggae roots, but opens the door to exciting new music sure to please fans of Mr. Boombastic. As Locilento explains, almost everything about Shaggy, is in fact rooted in the rich and lively culture of the Jamaican dancehall, a culture that's been the driving force behind almost every development in reggae music over thepast half-century, beginning in Jamaica and spreading throughout the worldin the form of hip hop, techno, and electronica.
Unpaid Annotation
From Jamaica to superstar: tracing the roots of a platinum selling reggae singer. "First and foremost, I am a reggae artist," insists Shaggy. Born Orville Richard Burrell, the multi-platinum pop icon is a worldwide ambassador for reggae, but few know just how connected Shaggy is with the sound of Jamaicanrhythms. Shaggy: Dogamuffin Style details the rise of a superstar from Kingston, Jamaica, to his teen years in Flatbush, Brooklyn, to his time spent in the Marines during the Gulf War, while at the same time introducing the reader to the fascinating history and rich culture of reggae music. Delving into the musical trends in Jamaica during Shaggy's formative years, the popularity of soundsystem "deejays" (the Jamaican equivalent of rap MCs), and the influence of both 1970s reggae and Bob Marley, Locilento provides an insight into Shaggy's unique sound. Although most, if not all, journalists label him a rapper, Shaggy:Dogamuffin Style reveals not onlyShaggy's reggae roots, but opens the door to exciting new music sure to please fans of Mr. Boombastic. As Locilento explains, almost everything about Shaggy, is in fact rooted inthe rich and lively culture of the Jamaican dancehall, a culture that's been the driving force behind almost every development in reggae music over the past half-century, beginning in Jamaica and spreading throughout the world in the form of hip hop, techno, and electronica.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. 7
Permissionsp. 9
Dancehall Don at the Top of the Popsp. 13
Reggae inna Dancehall Stylep. 29
Dancehall Culturep. 41
Version Galorep. 49
Under Mi Sleng Tengp. 71
Jamaicans in New Yorkp. 79
Semper Fidelis!p. 97
Babylon Homeworkp. 107
Pure Pleasurep. 117
Mr. Fantasticp. 133
Midnite Loserp. 143
Dog Nuh Deadp. 153
Reggae Ambassadorp. 165
Notesp. 172
Indexp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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