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Reformers on stage [electronic resource] : popular drama and religious propaganda in the low countries of Charles V, 1515-1556 /
Gary K. Waite.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo, [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2000.
description
xxii, 364 p., [8] p. : ill., facsims., map.
ISBN
0802044573, 9780802044570
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo, [N.Y.] : University of Toronto Press, c2000.
isbn
0802044573
9780802044570
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10523351
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [325]-351) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gary K. Waite is a professor of medieval and early modern European history at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-07-01:
Waite (history, Univ. of New Brunswick) analyzes the communication of religious reform ideas in the Low Countries through drama performed by the chambers of rhetoric--professional resident drama companies. Communication in early modern Europe has been an active area of research, and this study is an interesting and thorough examination of over 80 plays that might have influenced people's religious thinking in Antwerp and Amsterdam during the reign of Charles V. Oral communication was more important for the masses than print, and these rhetoricians understood their influence. Waite describes the two cities (the major commercial centers of the southern and northern Low Countries), the reform movements there, the plays and their religious overtones and asks the question, "how were reform ideas strained through the mental filters of Flemish and Dutch urbanites?" His conclusion on the influence equivocates as if there should be a sequel to this book. However, this is an exciting, fresh approach to the Reformation and early modern Europe that will make sense mainly to scholars experienced in these fields or to students of the history of drama. Recommended for undergraduate libraries with Reformation collections and all research libraries. J. J. Butt James Madison University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2001
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Summaries
Description for Reader
During the time of Charles V, plays were written and performed by amateur literary and acting societies known as chambers of rhetoric. Members of the chambers saw themselves not only as entertainers, but as religious and cultural leaders, and on the strength of this sense of mission became the most influential performers of vernacular drama in the Low Countries. Gary Waite examines the social and religious messages of the plays presented, showing how they promoted or opposed calls for reform, religious and otherwise. Presenting an overview of some eighty surviving scripts from across the Low Countries, Waite considers the culture and drama of two distinct urban communities in particular: Antwerp and Amsterdam. He argues that the dramatists promoted a wide range of reform perspectives, but in so doing they reshaped reform ideas to accommodate their own concerns as urban artisans and merchants. In the end, despite their desire for peace, they contributed significantly to the rise of anticlerical sentiment and reform aspirations and to increasing dissatisfaction with Habsburg rule. Offering perspectives gleaned from primary material that is available only in sixteenth-century Dutch, this study adds significantly to existing scholarship on the local ramifications of the Reformation in the Low Countries.
Description for Reader
During the time of Charles V, plays were written and performed by amateur literary and acting societies known as chambers of rhetoric. Members of the chambers saw themselves not only as entertainers, but as religious and cultural leaders, and on the strength of this sense of mission became the most influential performers of vernacular drama in the Low Countries. Gary Waite examines the social and religious messages of the plays presented, showing how they promoted or opposed calls for reform, religious and otherwise.Presenting an overview of some eighty surviving scripts from across the Low Countries, Waite considers the culture and drama of two distinct urban communities in particular: Antwerp and Amsterdam. He argues that the dramatists promoted a wide range of reform perspectives, but in so doing they reshaped reform ideas to accommodate their own concerns as urban artisans and merchants. In the end, despite their desire for peace, they contributed significantly to the rise of anticlerical sentiment and reform aspirations and to increasing dissatisfaction with Habsburg rule.Offering perspectives gleaned from primary material that is available only in sixteenth-century Dutch, this study adds significantly to existing scholarship on the local ramifications of the Reformation in the Low Countries.
Unpaid Annotation
During The Time Of Charles V, Plays Were Written And Performed by amateur literary and acting societies known as the chambers of rhetoric. Members of the chambers of rhetoric saw themselves not only as entertainers, but as religious and cultural leaders, and on the strength of this sense of mission became the most influential performers of vernacular drama in the Low Countries. Gary Waite examines the social and religious messages of the plays presented, showing how they promoted or opposed calls for reform, religious and otherwise.Presenting an overview of some eighty surviving scripts from across the Low Countries, Waite considers the culture and drama, in particular, of two distinct urban communes: Antwerp and Amsterdam. He argues that the dramatists promoted a wide range of reform perspectives, but in so doing they reshaped reform ideas to accommodate their own concerns as urban artisans and merchants. In the end, despite their desire for peace, they contributed significantly to the rise of anti-clerical sentiment and reform aspirations and to increasing dissatisfaction with Habsburg rule.Offering perspectives gleaned from primary material that is available only in sixteenth-century Dutch, this study adds significantly to existing scholarship on the local ramifications of the Reformation in the Low Countries.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Reform Propaganda and Vernacular Dramap. xiii
List of Abbreviationsp. xxv
Drama and Society in the Low Countriesp. 1
Civic Culture and Religious Reform in the Netherlandsp. 3
Rhetoricians and Urban Culturep. 26
Vernacular Drama and the Early Urban Reformationp. 49
The Chambers of Rhetoric in Antwerpp. 51
Amsterdam Rhetoricians and the Reformationp. 79
Reform Themes in Rhetorician Drama, 1519-56p. 99
Anticlerical Drama and the Reform Controversies in the Low Countries, 1519-38p. 101
Popular Ritual, Social Protest, and the Rhetorician Competition in Ghent, 1539p. 134
Rhetoricians and Reform after the Ghent Competition, 1539-56p. 165
War, Peace, and the Imperial Majesty in Rhetorician Drama, 1519-56p. 183
Conclusionp. 202
List of Plays Composed during the Reign of Charles V and Their Reform Perspectivep. 209
Notesp. 217
Bibliographyp. 325
Indexp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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