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Principles of tsawalk [electronic resource] : an indigenous approach to global crisis /
Umeek (E. Richard Atleo).
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2012.
description
xiv, 202 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780774821278 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2012.
isbn
9780774821278 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10521325
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Umeek (E. Richard Atleo) is a hereditary Nuu-chah-nulth chief. Currently, he is a research liaison at the University of Manitoba and an associate adjunct professor at the University of Victoria. He is the author of Tsawalk: A Nuu-chah-nulth Worldview.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Tsawalk,or "one," expresses the Nuu-chah-nulth view that all living things -- human, plant, and animal -- form part of an integrated whole brought into harmony through constant negotiation and mutual respect. In this book, Umeek argues that contemporary environmental and political crises and the ongoing plight of indigenous peoples reflect a world out of balance, a world in which Western approaches for sustainable living are not working. Nuu-chah-nulth principles of recognition, consent, and continuity, by contrast, hold the promise of bringing greater harmony, where all life forms are treated with respect and accorded formal constitutional recognition.
Reviews
Review Quotes
This book is captivating, thoughtful, and startling in its clarity. It draws on the wisdom and insights of many scholars, but, most significantly, it is grounded firmly in the philosophies and origin stories of Dr. Atleo#146;s own Nuu-chah-nulth culture, representative of countless Indigenous philosophical approaches to life ... and it points to a different pathway that can lead to greater understanding, greater empathy, and stronger connections with each other and with all the other life forms with whom we share this planet.-- Nancy Turner, Distinguished Professor, School of Environmental Studies, University of VictoriaTsawalk, or "one," expresses the Nuu-chah-nulth view that all living things -- human, plant, and animal -- form part of an integrated whole brought into harmony through constant negotiation and mutual respect. In this book, Umeek argues that contemporary environmental and political crises and the ongoing plight of indigenous peoples reflect a world out of balance, a world in which Western approaches for sustainable living are not working. Nuu-chah-nulth principles of recognition, consent, and continuity, by contrast, hold the promise of bringing greater harmony, where all life forms are treated with respect and accorded formal constitutional recognition.-- John R. Wiens, Professor and Dean, Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba
This book is captivating, thoughtful, and startling in its clarity. It draws on the wisdom and insights of many scholars, but, most significantly, it is grounded firmly in the philosophies and origin stories of Dr. Atleo's own Nuu-chah-nulth culture, representative of countless Indigenous philosophical approaches to life ... and it points to a different pathway that can lead to greater understanding, greater empathy, and stronger connections with each other and with all the other life forms with whom we share this planet. - Nancy Turner, Distinguished Professor, School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria
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Summaries
Description for Teachers/Educators
This book will be of interest to environmentalists, policy-makers, andscholars of Aboriginal studies, philosophy, law, and political science.
Long Description
The word tsawalk, literally one, expresses the ancientNuu-chah-nulth view that all living things - human, plant, andanimal - form part of an integrated whole brought into harmonythrough constant negotiation and mutual respect. In Principles ofTsawalk, Umeek argues that contemporary environmental andpolitical crises reflect a world out of balance. Building upon his first book, Tsawalk: A Nuu-chah-nulthWorldview, Umeek weaves together indigenous and Western worldviewsinto an alternative framework for responding to global environmentaland political crises and to the dispossession and displacement ofindigenous peoples. These problems, the author shows, stem from anhistorical and persistent failure to treat all peoples and life formswith respect and accord them constitutional recognition. As this bookdemonstrates, the Nuu-chah-nulth principles of recognition, consent,and continuity, embodied in songs, language, and ceremonies, hold thepromise of achieving sustainable lifeways in this shared struggle forbalance.
Main Description
In Nuu-chah-nulth, the wordtsawalkmeans "one." It expresses the view that all living things - humans, plants, and animals - form part of an integrated whole brought into harmony through constant negotiation and mutual respect for the other. Contemporary environmental and political crises, however, reflect a world out of balance, a world in which Western approaches for sustainable living are not working. InPrinciples of Tsawalk,hereditary chief Umeek builds upon his previous book,Tsawalk: A Nuu-chah-nulth Worldview, to elaborate an alternative framework for responding to global environmental and political crises and to indigenous peoples' poverty, dispossession, and displacement in the realms of education and politics. These problems, Umeek argues, stem from an historical and persistent failure to treat all peoples and life forms with respect and accord them constitutional recognition. By contrast, the Nuu-chah-nulth principles of recognition, consent, and continuity, embodied in songs, language, and ceremonies, hold the promise of achieving sustainable lifeways in this shared struggle for balance. By weaving together Nuu-chah-nulth and Western worldviews, hereditary chief Umeek creates a new philosophical foundation for building more equitable and sustainable communities. Umeek (E. Richard Atleo), a hereditary Nuu-chah-nulth chief, is a research liaison at the University of Manitoba and an associate adjunct professor at the University of Victoria. He is the author ofTsawalk: A Nuu-chah-nulth Worldview.
Main Description
Tsawalk, or “one,” expresses the Nuu-chah-nulth view that all living things -- human, plant, and animal -- form part of an integrated whole brought into harmony through constant negotiation and mutual respect. In this book, Umeek argues that contemporary environmental and political crises and the ongoing plight of indigenous peoples reflect a world out of balance, a world in which Western approaches for sustainable living are not working. Nuu-chah-nulth principles of recognition, consent, and continuity, by contrast, hold the promise of bringing greater harmony, where all life forms are treated with respect and accorded formal constitutional recognition.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Wikis ca?miihta: Things Are Out of Balance, Things Are Not in Harmonyp. 9
Mirrors and Patternsp. 39
Genesis of Global Crisis and a Theory of Tsawalkp. 57
The Nuu-chah-nulth Principle of Recognitionp. 79
The Nuu-chah-nulth Principle of Consentp. 93
The Nuu-chah-nulth Principle of Continuityp. 117
Hahuulism: "Our Stories Are True!"p. 139
Notesp. 171
Indexp. 189
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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