Catalogue


Peeking through the keyhole [electronic resource] : the evolution of North American homes /
Avi Friedman & David Krawitz.
imprint
Montreal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2002.
description
212 p. : ill.
ISBN
0773524398 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
added author
imprint
Montreal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2002.
isbn
0773524398 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10519625
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [195]-207) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Avi Friedman is associate professor and director of the Affordable Homes Program at McGill University. He has won numerous awards, including the World Habitat Award (United Nations), the Creative Achievement Award (Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture), and the Prix J.-Armand Bombardier (Association canadienne-francaise pour l'avancement des sciences) for his Grow Home and Next Home innovations David Krawitz is administrative coordinator in the School of Architecture, McGill University. He has worked on numerous research projects, including studies on export housing to Latin America, international self-build housing projects, conversion of under-used industrial buildings to housing, and the Next Home
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-04-01:
The decades since the close of WW II have been packed with sweeping changes that have affected pursuit of the Great American dream and designs of the culmination of that dream: our homes. In Peeking through the Keyhole, Friedman and Krawitz (both, McGill Univ.) take readers on "a journey through ... trends and changes in home design" as influenced by rapidly shifting lifestyles, economies, and environmental and technological pressures. Although heavily researched, as suggested by the excellent bibliography, the text is less academic and more an assemblage of reflections. Well written and an easy, albeit sad, read, the seven chapters discuss topics ranging from kitchen design and space allotment for children and seniors to frequent design changes, influenced by consumerism and advertising. The two negatives are the misnomer of the title--"evolution" suggests a longer timespan than the 50-plus years the book spans--and the lack of illustrations beyond the little 1.5-inch x 2-inch black and whites near each chapter title. The authors successfully fulfill their motive: to show that "the events of recent years have altered the process of home design." The American Dream of home ownership has become a mere purchase, hyped by marketing strategies. "We are sacrificing community for a commodity." ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. L. B. Sickels-Taves Eastern Michigan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Informative and entertaining. Organizing a view of the evolution of the home through elements of the human condition that we all have to deal with is a clever way of packaging a lot of practical information." Kieran M. Bonner, Academic Dean and Professor of Sociology, St Jerome's University in the University of Waterloo, and author of A Great Place to Raise Kids. Interpretation, Science and The Urban-Rural Debate "Interesting and convincing. The authors are willing to make moral and political judgements of the trends and options being discussed, and this is one of the book's strengths." Will Straw, Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University
"Informative and entertaining. Organizing a view of the evolution of the home through elements of the human condition that we all have to deal with is a clever way of packaging a lot of practical information." Kieran M. Bonner, Academic Dean and Professor of Sociology, St Jerome's University in the University of Waterloo, and author of A Great Place to Raise Kids. Interpretation, Science and The Urban-Rural Debate"Interesting and convincing. The authors are willing to make moral and political judgements of the trends and options being discussed, and this is one of the book's strengths." Will Straw, Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University" . . . an engaging tour of the North American home of the past fifty years. . . . this is awelcome book, worth reading. The book examines home as simultaneously a material and ametaphorical place; a site in which the links between ideas, vaules, things, and their spatialarrangements,. are especially apparent. For me this is the key strength of the book and makesit a worthwhile read for those interested in the broad fields of urban and cultural geography, aswell as the narrower fields of housing studies and architectural history."--Environment andPlanning A, 2004, vol 36
This item was reviewed in:
Quill & Quire, October 2002
Choice, April 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This journey and meditation through the trends and changes in home design and construction over the last 50 years demonstrates how much life has changed since World War 2, and how the transformations in society, the economy and lifestyles are reflected in our homes.
Main Description
Peeking through the Keyhole is about transformations in the way we live and the places we call home. Until the past few decades, transitions in the style of homes and types of households were slow and gradual.With today's instant communication, the way we observe other people, other cultures, and other times has altered, and been altered by, the homes we live in. Avi Friedman and David Krawitz guide the reader through the trends and changes that have influenced residential design and construction over the last fifty years. From kitchens to home offices to entire neighbourhoods, they unravel the effect of technology and consumerism on the way we perceive and use domestic space, arguing that the home is no longer a product of pure design but a response to factors and forces beyond the control of designers, builders, and users. Each chapter approaches the theme of home from a different vantage point: the first three chapters focus on food and kitchens, communication, construction and renovation; the middle chapters deal with childhood and aging; and the final chapters examine our ideas of home in the context of the broader community and as an object of commerce. The authors demonstrate how much life has changed in the years following the Second World War, showing how transformations in society, the economy, and lifestyles are reflected in our homes.Of related interest The Grow HomeAvid FriedmanHardback * 0-7735-2168-2 * £22.95
Main Description
With today's instant communication, the way we observe other people, other cultures, and other times has altered, and been altered by, the homes we live in. Avi Friedman and David Krawitz guide the reader through the trends and changes that have influenced residential design and construction over the last fifty years. From kitchens to home offices to entire neighbourhoods, they unravel the effect of technology and consumerism on the way we perceive and use domestic space, arguing that the home is no longer a product of pure design but a response to factors and forces beyond the control of designers, builders, and users. Each chapter approaches the theme of home from a different vantage point: the first three chapters focus on food and kitchens, communication, construction and renovation; the middle chapters deal with childhood and aging; and the final chapters examine our ideas of home in the context of the broader community and as an object of commerce. The authors demonstrate how much life has changed in the years following the Second World War, showing how transformations in society, the economy, and lifestyles are reflected in our homes.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introduction: The Accelerated Presentp. 3
What We Eat, Where We Eatp. 18
Webs and Wiresp. 42
Buy New or Renovate?p. 71
Living with Kidsp. 95
Growing Old at Homep. 118
Where Exactly Do We Live?p. 143
Home as a Consumer Productp. 164
Afterword: Where Do We Go From Here?p. 188
Bibliographyp. 195
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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