Catalogue


In twilight and in dawn [electronic resource] : a biography of Diamond Jenness /
Barnett Richling.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, [2012]
description
xxi, 413 pages : illustrations, map, portraits ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780773539815
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, [2012]
isbn
9780773539815
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Antipodean Arcadia, 1886-1908 -- The second horse, 1908-1911 -- On a Bwaidokan veranda, 1911-1912 -- Chance and necessity, 1913-1914 -- Kiss of the white man, 1914-1916 -- In the trenches, 1916-1919 -- An unloved stepchild, 1919-1931 -- Peoples of memory, 1921 -- Jostling tribes, 1923-1924 -- Ancestors and cradles, 1926 -- A Sisyphean puzzle, 1927-1935 -- Turning the page, 1929-1936 -- Behind high walls, 1936-1948 -- A brand new day, 1948-1969 -- Epilogue : The afterlife of Diamond Jenness.
abstract
"When New Zealand-born and Oxford-educated anthropologist Diamond Jenness set aside hopes of building a career in the South Pacific to join Vilhjalmur Stefansson's Canadian Arctic Expedition, he had little idea of what lay ahead. But Jenness thrived under the duress of that transformational experience: the groundbreaking ethnographic work he accomplished, recounted in People of the Twilight and in Dawn in Arctic Alaska, proved to be a lasting contribution to twentieth-century anthropology, and the foundation of a career he would devote to researching Canada's first peoples. Barnett Richling draws upon a wealth of documentary sources to shed light on Jenness's tenure with the Anthropological Division of the National Museum of Canada - a forerunner of the Canadian Museum of Civilization - during which his investigations took him beyond the Arctic to seven First Nations [Aboriginal or Native peoples] communities from Georgian Bay to British Columbia's interior.
Jenness was renowned as a pre-eminent scholar of Inuit culture, but he also stood out for the contributions his field work made to linguistics, ethnology, material culture, and Northern archaeology. His story is also an institutional one: Jenness worked as a public servant at a time when the federal government spearheaded anthropological research, although his abiding commitment to the first peoples of his adopted homeland placed him at odds with Ottawa's approach to aboriginal affairs. In Twilight and in Dawn is an exploration of one man's life in anthropology, and of the conditions - at the museum, on the reserves, in society's mainstream, and in the world at large - that inspired and shaped Jenness's contributions to science, to his profession, and to public life. An informative study of the evolution of a discipline focused through the life of one of its leading practitioners, In Twilight and in Dawn is an illuminating look at anthropological thought and practice in Canada during the first half of the twentieth century."--Publisher's description.
catalogue key
10509370
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Barnett Richling draws upon a wealth of sources to shed light on Jennesss tenure with the Anthropological Division of the National Museum of Canada. His field work took him beyond the Arctic to seven First Nations communities from Georgian By to British Columbias interior. Renowned as a pre-eminent scholar of Inuit culture, Jenness also influenced linguistics, ethnology, material culture, and Northern archaeology. His story is also one of institutional conflict: Jenness worked as a public servant at a time when the federal government spearheaded anthropological research, although his commitment to the first peoples of his adopted homeland placed him at odds with Ottawas approach to aboriginal affairs. In Twilight and in Dawn is an exploration of one mans life in anthropology, and of the conditions-at the museum, on the reserves, in societys mainstream, and in the world at large-that shaped his work.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A first-rate biography." Winnipeg Free Press
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
From New Guinea to the Arctic and beyond - the life and times of Diamond Jenness, one of Canada's foremost anthropologists.
Main Description
When New Zealand-born and Oxford-educated anthropologist Diamond Jenness set aside hopes of building a career in the South Pacific to join Vilhjalmur Stefansson's Canadian Arctic Expedition, he had little idea of what lay ahead. But Jenness thrived under the duress of that transformational experience: the groundbreaking ethnographic work he accomplished recounted in People of the Twilight and in Dawn in Arctic Alaska , proved to be a lasting contribution to twentieth-century anthropology, and the foundation of a career he would devote to researching Canada's first peoples. Barnett Richling draws upon a wealth of documentary sources to shed light on Jenness's tenure with the Anthropological Division of the National Museum of Canada - a forerunner of the Canadian Museum of Civilization - during which his investigations took him beyond the Arctic to seven First Nations communities from Georgian Bay to British Columbia's interior. Jenness was renowned as a pre-eminent scholar of Inuit culture, but he also stood out for the contributions his field work made to linguistics, ethnology, material culture, and Northern archaeology. His story is also an institutional one: Jenness worked as a public servant at a time when the federal government spearheaded anthropological research, although his abiding commitment to the first peoples of his adopted homeland placed him at odds with Ottawa's approach to aboriginal affairs. In Twilight and in Dawn is an exploration of one man's life in anthropology, and of the conditions - at the museum, on the reserves, in society's mainstream, and in the world at large - that inspired and shaped Jenness's contributions to science, to his profession, and to public life. An informative study of the evolution of a discipline focused through the life of one of its leading practitioners, In Twilight and in Dawn is an illuminating look at anthropological thought and practice in Canada during the first half of the twentieth century.
Main Description
When New Zealand-born and Oxford-educated anthropologist Diamond Jenness set aside hopes of building a career in the South Pacific to join Vilhjalmur Stefansson's Canadian Arctic Expedition, he had little idea of what lay ahead. But Jenness thrived under the duress of that transformational experience: the groundbreaking ethnographic work he accomplished, recounted in People of the Twilight and in Dawn in Arctic Alaska, proved to be a lasting contribution to twentieth-century anthropology, and the foundation of a career he would devote to researching Canada's first peoples. Barnett Richling draws upon a wealth of documentary sources to shed light on Jenness's tenure with the Anthropological Division of the National Museum of Canada - a forerunner of the Canadian Museum of Civilization - during which his investigations took him beyond the Arctic to seven First Nations communities from Georgian Bay to British Columbia's interior. Jenness was renowned as a pre-eminent scholar of Inuit culture, but he also stood out for the contributions his field work made to linguistics, ethnology, material culture, and Northern archaeology. His story is also an institutional one: Jenness worked as a public servant at a time when the federal government spearheaded anthropological research, although his abiding commitment to the first peoples of his adopted homeland placed him at odds with Ottawa's approach to aboriginal affairs. In Twilight and in Dawn is an exploration of one man's life in anthropology, and of the conditions - at the museum, on the reserves, in society's mainstream, and in the world at large - that inspired and shaped Jenness's contributions to science, to his profession, and to public life. An informative study of the evolution of a discipline focused through the life of one of its leading practitioners, In Twilight and in Dawn is an illuminating look at anthropological thought and practice in Canada during the first half of the twentieth century.
Main Description
When New Zealand-born, Oxford-educated anthropologist Diamond Jenness set aside hopes of a career in the south Pacific to join Vilhjalmur StefanssonÆs Canadian Arctic Expedition, he had little idea of what lay ahead. But Jenness thrived under the duress of that transformational experience: his groundbreaking ethnographic work, recounted in People of the Twilight and Dawn in Arclic Alaska, became a lasting contribution to twentieth-century anthropology, and the foundation of a career devoted to researching CanadaÆs first peoples. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Antipodean Arcadia, 1886-1908p. 3
The Second Horse, 1908-1911p. 19
On a Bwaidokan Veranda, 1911-1912p. 36
Chance and Necessity, 1913-1914p. 55
Kiss of the White Man, 1914-1916p. 87
In the Trenches, 1916-1919p. 111
An Unloved Stepchild, 1919-1931p. 127
Peoples of Memory, 1921p. 154
Jostling Tribes, 1923-1924p. 171
Ancestors and Cradles, 1926p. 195
A Sisyphean Puzzle, 1927-1935p. 222
Turning the Page, 1929-1936p. 245
Behind High Walls, 1936-1948p. 273
A Brand New Day, 1948-1969p. 298
Epilogue: The Afterlife of Diamond Jennessp. 330
Notesp. 339
Referencesp. 377
Indexp. 405
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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