Catalogue


Human rights in an information age [electronic resource] : a philosophical analysis /
Gregory J. Walters.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2001.
description
xx, 335 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802035833
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2001.
isbn
0802035833
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction 3 -- The Information Age Revolution 4 -- Purpose and Methodology 10 -- Three Ethical Challenges of Canadian Information Highway -- Policy 10 -- Aims and Terminological Presuppositions 14 -- The Conceptual Importance of Information to Human Rights 18 -- Philosophical Parameters and Thesis 21 -- Structure of the Book 23 -- 1 The Philosophical Framework 26 -- The Information Age in the Context of Modernity 26 -- Human Rights in an Information Age 32 -- 2 Information Highway Policy and E-Commerce Strategy 53 -- The Public Policy Product Cycle 53 -- Historical and Sociological Specification of Canadian Com- -- munications Policy 55 -- Industry Canada and the Information Highway Advisory -- Council 60 -- IHAC Policy Phase I: 1993-95 61 --IHAC Policy Phase II: 1996-98 67 -- IHAC Policy Phase III: The Canadian Electronic Commerce -- Strategy 69 -- Methodological and Ethical Analysis 72 -- 3 The Informational Economy, Work, and Productive Agency 80 -- Productive Agency, Work, and Human Capital 81 -- Two Justifications of Private Property 86 -- Inequality and the Restriction of Property Rights 89 -- The Global Situation: The Informational Economy 93 -- The North American Situation 102 -- The Informational Economy and the Community of Rights 116 -- 4 Privacy and Security Policy: The Historical Situation 117 -- The Global Situation 117 -- The Canadian Situation 125 -- Conclusion 147 -- 5 Privacy and Security: An Ethical Analysis 150 -- Surveying Our Technological Situation 151 -- Legal, Social Science, and Philosophical Conceptions of -- Privacy 157 -- Action Theory and the Ethical Justification of Privacy Rights 164 -- Privacy and Security Policy in the Light of the Principle of -- Human Rights 165 -- Conclusion 183 -- 6 Information Warfare 187 -- The 'Revolution in Military Affairs' 188 -- Information Warfare: Definitions and Conceptions 190 -- Global Surveillance Practices: The ECHELON Network 196 -- Strategic Information Warfare Rising 199 -- Information Warfare and International Human Rights Law 201 -- Information Warfare and the Principle of Generic Consistency 204 -- A 'Just' Information War? 213 -- Is 'Perpetual Peace' Possible in the Information Age? 214 -- Conclusion 216 -- 7 Information Warfare and Deterrence 218 -- Information Warfare Policy: Clarifying the Terms of the Debate 219 Instrumental Rationality, Reasonableness, and Motivation 221 -- Strategic Information Warfare Deterrence and the Prisoner's -- Dilemma 225 -- Rethinking Policy Alternatives for the Information Age 231 -- Conclusion 236 -- Conclusion: Towards a Global Community of Rights -- in the Information Age 238 -- Notes 255 -- References 277 -- Index 313.
catalogue key
10508706
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gregory J. Walters is Professor of Ethics in the Faculties of Theology and Philosophy at Saint Paul University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-10-01:
Paradoxically, Walters (Saint Paul Univ.) suggests that everything changes in the information age, while nothing changes in the need for the protection of human rights. His views are theoretically grounded in problems of modernity, Jasper's view of starting inquiry in the historical situation, and Gewirth's views of universal human claim-rights to freedom and well-being. Walters successfully links philosophical rights theory to contemporary, Canadian, sociopolitical discussions about information technology: privacy/security issues, information wars, economic efficiencies and protection for human dignity, economic disparity, and deterrence. With 34 pages of references, 20 pages of notes and three pages of abbreviations, the research is impressively extensive. After September 11, his earlier observations about cyberwars are eerie. Sadly, some are based on critiques of recycled just-war, deterrence theories and on questionable predictions about the equivalency of the consequences of conventional, nuclear, and information wars, in opposition to a weakly optimistic human rights alternative. To its great credit, this excellent book is self-critical, confronting skeptics' views about rights. It is clear about the threats of the information age posed by smart cards, genetic mapping, encryption technologies, and privacy limits due to security needs, along with the cyberwar threat from 13 million a-sociopolitical warriors. For undergraduates through faculty and professionals. J. Gough Red Deer College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
How can we balance new information technology practices with human rights? In Human Rights in an Information Age, Gregory Walters analyses Canadian and global information highway policy and practices regarding the Internet, e-commerce, public health and safety, privacy and security, and information warfare from a philosophical, human rights framework that views freedom and well-being as the necessary conditions of human action. Walters situates the information age revolution within the broader historical and technological situation of modernity. Drawing on the action-based philosophical human rights framework of Alan Gewirth, Walters applies the Principle of Generic Consistency to a host of policy issues, and argues that values of mutuality, trust, and social solidarity are increasingly vital to the promotion and protection of human dignity and human rights in the information age.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xvii
Introductionp. 3
The Information Age Revolutionp. 4
Purpose and Methodologyp. 10
Three Ethical Challenges of Canadian Information Highway Policyp. 10
Aims and Terminological Presuppositionsp. 14
The Conceptual Importance of Information to Human Rightsp. 18
Philosophical Parameters and Thesisp. 21
Structure of the Bookp. 23
The Philosophical Frameworkp. 26
The Information Age in the Context of Modernityp. 26
Human Rights in an Information Agep. 32
Information Highway Policy and E-Commerce Strategyp. 53
The Public Policy Product Cyclep. 53
Historical and Sociological Specification of Canadian Communications Policyp. 55
Industry Canada and the Information Highway Advisory Councilp. 60
IHAC Policy Phase I: 1993-95p. 61
IHAC Policy Phase II: 1996-98p. 67
IHAC Policy Phase III: The Canadian Electronic Commerce Strategyp. 69
Methodological and Ethical Analysisp. 72
The Informational Economy, Work, and Productive Agencyp. 80
Productive Agency, Work, and Human Capitalp. 81
Two Justifications of Private Propertyp. 86
Inequality and the Restriction of Property Rightsp. 89
The Global Situation: The Informational Economyp. 93
The North American Situationp. 102
The Informational Economy and the Community of Rightsp. 116
Privacy and Security Policy: The Historical Situationp. 117
The Global Situationp. 117
The Canadian Situationp. 125
Conclusionp. 147
Privacy and Security: An Ethical Analysisp. 150
Surveying Our Technological Situationp. 151
Legal, Social Science, and Philosophical Conceptions of Privacyp. 157
Action Theory and the Ethical Justification of Privacy Rightsp. 164
Privacy and Security Policy in the Light of the Principle of Human Rightsp. 165
Conclusionp. 183
Information Warfarep. 187
The 'Revolution in Military Affairs'p. 188
Information Warfare: Definitions and Conceptionsp. 190
Global Surveillance Practices: The ECHELON Networkp. 196
Strategic Information Warfare Risingp. 199
Information Warfare and International Human Rights Lawp. 201
Information Warfare and the Principle of Generic Consistencyp. 204
A 'Just' Information War?p. 213
Is 'Perpetual Peace' Possible in the Information Age?p. 214
Conclusionp. 216
Information Warfare and Deterrencep. 218
Information Warfare Policy: Clarifying the Terms of the Debatep. 219
Instrumental Rationality, Reasonableness, and Motivationp. 221
Strategic Information Warfare Deterrence and the Prisoner's Dilemmap. 225
Rethinking Policy Alternatives for the Information Agep. 231
Conclusionp. 236
Conclusion: Towards a Global Community of Rights in the Information Agep. 238
Notesp. 255
Referencesp. 277
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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