Catalogue

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How Canadians communicate [electronic resource] /
edited by David Taras, Frits Pannekoek, and Maria Bakardjieva.
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, 2003.
description
332 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1552381048 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, 2003.
isbn
1552381048 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10508551
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
How Canadians Communicate is a timely collection that chronicles the extraordinary changes that are shaking the foundations of Canadas cultural and communications industries in the twenty-first century. With essays from some of Canada's foremost media scholars, this book discusses the major trends and developments that have taken place in government policy, corporate strategies, creative communities, and various communication mediums: newspapers, films, cellular and palm technology, the Internet, libraries, TV, music, and book publishing. This volume addresses many issues unique to Canada in a broader framework of global communications. Specifically, it looks at new media communications in Aboriginal communities, the changing role of the state in cultural institutions, the conglomeratization of the media, the threat of American and global communications to Canadian voices, and the struggle to retain and reclaim local and national identities in the face of globalization. With articles from academics and professionals across Canada, How Canadians Communicate provides the most current perspectives on communication in Canada in a rapidly changing world of technology and global communication.
Main Description
This is a timely collection that chronicles the extraordinary changes that are shaking the foundations of Canada's cultural and communications industries in the twenty-first century. With essays from some of Canada's foremost media scholars, this book discusses the major trends and developments that have taken place in government policy, corporate strategies, creative communities, and various communication mediums: newspapers, films, cellular and palm technology, the Internet, libraries, TV, music, and book publishing. This volume addresses many issues unique to Canada in a broader framework of global communications. Specifically, it looks at new media communications in Aboriginal communities, the changing role of the state in cultural institutions, the conglomeratisation of the media, the threat of American and global communications to Canadian voices, and the struggle to retain and reclaim local and national identities in the face of globalisation. With articles from academics and professionals across Canada, this book provides the most current perspectives on communication in Canada in a rapidly changing world of technology and global communication.
Main Description
This is a timely collection that chronicles the extraordinary changes that are shaking the foundations of Canada's cultural & communications industries in the twenty-first century. With essays from some of Canada's foremost media scholars, this book discusses the major trends & developments that have taken place in government policy, corporate strategies, creative communities, & various communication mediums: newspapers, films, cellular & palm technology, the Internet, libraries, TV, music, & book publishing. This volume addresses many issues unique to Canada in a broader framework of global communications. Specifically, it looks at new media communications in Aboriginal communities, the changing role of the state in cultural institutions, the conglomeratisation of the media, the threat of American & global communications to Canadian voices, & the struggle to retain & reclaim local & national identities in the face of globalisation. With articles from academics & professionals across Canada, this book provides the most current perspectives on communication in Canada in a rapidly changing world of technology & global communication.
Unpaid Annotation
Timely collection that chronicles the extraordinary changes that are shaking the foundations of Canada's cultural and communications industries in the twenty-first century.
Unpaid Annotation
Timely collection that chronicles the extraordinary changes that are shaking the foundations of Canada's cultural and communications industries in the twenty-first century. With essays from some of Canada's foremost media scholars, this book discusses the major trends and developments that have taken place in government policy, corporate strategies, creative communities, and various communication media.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The New World of Communications in Canadap. 9
Government and Corporate Policies
From master to Partner to Bit Player: The Diminishing Capacity of Government Policyp. 27
No Clear Channel: The Rise and Possible Fall of Media Convergencep. 51
Canadian Memory Institutions and the Digital Revolution: The Last Five Yearsp. 71
Canadian Media and Canadian Identity
Printed Matter: Canadian Newspapersp. 97
Publishing and Perishing with No Parachutep. 121
Canadian Television: Industry, Audience and Technologyp. 143
In From the Cold: Aboriginal Media in Canadap. 165
Film and Film Culture in Canada: Which Way Forward?p. 185
No Future? The Canadian Music Industriesp. 203
New Media and Canadian Society
"Unhyping" the Internet: At Home with a New Mediump. 225
Telehealth in Canadap. 253
From the "Electronic Cottage" to the "Silicon Sweatshop": Social Implications of Telemediated Work in Canadap. 275
Notes on Contributorsp. 306
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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