Catalogue


A history of histories of German literature [electronic resource] : 1835-1914 /
Michael S. Batts.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1993.
description
xii, 301 p.
ISBN
0773511407 (alk. paper) :
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1993.
isbn
0773511407 (alk. paper) :
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10508270
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 218-287) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book is a unique enterprise of vast dimensions. It is a major contribution to 'Germanistik' in particular and to history of literature in general ... It will, in all likelihood, remain the only history of histories of German literature for a long time." Gerwin Marahrens, Department of Germanic Languages, University of Alberta
"This book is a unique enterprise of vast dimensions. It is a major contribution to Germanistik' in particular and to history of literature in general ... It will, in all likelihood, remain the only history of histories of German literature for a long time." Gerwin Marahrens, Department of Germanic Languages, University of Alberta
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Summaries
Main Description
Batts analyses the kinds of predisposition, or bias, displayed by the authors of these works, and accounts for the persistence of certain biases over a long period of time. Histories of German literature published in other western European countries, Britain, and North America are also evaluated to determine to what extent, if any, a particular (i.e., non-German) attitude towards German literature is characteristic of a given country. The recognition of personal, religious, national, and other biases is important since the stereotypical image of the people of a given country is strongly influenced by the manner in which their literature is portrayed. Batts concludes that the history of German literature as it developed in the nineteenth century has doubly distorted history. The selection of works for inclusion in the histories on subjective grounds of "quality" conceals the fact that other, "inferior," works may in their time have had a far greater impact. As well, the authors of the histories fail to discuss those works from the past that are still being read.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
From Gervinus to the Middle of the Nineteenth Centuryp. 1
From the Middle of the Nineteenth Century to Scherer (1883)p. 34
The End of the Nineteenth Century and the Beginning of the Twentieth Centuryp. 58
Titles, Periodization, and the Literary Canonp. 82
The Most Successful Histories of German Literature and Translations into Other Languagesp. 95
Foreign Histories of German Literature: Frenchp. 112
Foreign Histories of German Literature: English-language Areas (UK, USA)p. 129
Foreign Histories of German Literature: Austria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Sweden, Switzerlandp. 151
An Overviewp. 176
Conclusionp. 213
Bibliographyp. 217
Indexp. 288
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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