Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Forging business-labour partnerships [electronic resource] : the emergence of sector councils in Canada /
edited by Andrew Sharpe and Morley Gunderson.
imprint
Toronto, Ont. : Published in cooperation with the Centre for the Study of Living Standards by University of Toronto Press, c1998.
description
xii, 332 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802009042, 9780802009043
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto, Ont. : Published in cooperation with the Centre for the Study of Living Standards by University of Toronto Press, c1998.
isbn
0802009042
9780802009043
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10505705
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Reader
The recent emergence of joint business-labour sector councils represents a major innovation in Canadian industrial relations. The federal government and certain provincial governments have developed these councils as a key component of their human-resource development initiative. This collection brings together the views of economists, political scientists, and industrial-relations specialists on this important experiment. The authors suggest that, despite its innovative spirit, the sectoral initiative is fragile. Its future viability and wider diffusion depend on mutual trust and the long-term commitment of labour, management, and governments. Still, the consensus-building approach is seen as a remarkable achievement in Canada's adversarial institutional climate, with the potential to transform the nature and direction of Canadian labour-management relationships. In bringing together a wide range of views on sector councils, this book is a singular resource for all those interested in industrial relations, labour economics, and public policy.
Description for Reader
The recent emergence of joint business-labour sector councils represents a major innovation in Canadian industrial relations. The federal government and certain provincial governments have developed these councils as a key component of their human-resource development initiative. This collection brings together the views of economists, political scientists, and industrial-relations specialists on this important experiment.The authors suggest that, despite its innovative spirit, the sectoral initiative is fragile. Its future viability and wider diffusion depend on mutual trust and the long-term commitment of labour, management, and governments. Still, the consensus-building approach is seen as a remarkable achievement in Canada's adversarial institutional climate, with the potential to transform the nature and direction of Canadian labour-management relationships.In bringing together a wide range of views on sector councils, this book is a singular resource for all those interested in industrial relations, labour economics, and public policy.
Unpaid Annotation
The Recent Emergence of Joint Business-Labour Sector Councils represents a major innovation in Canadian industrial relations. The federal government and certain provincial governments have developed these councils as a key component of their human-resource development initiative. This collection brings together the views of economists, political scientists, and industrial-relations specialists on this important experiment.The authors suggest that, despite its innovative spirit, the sectoral initiative is fragile. Its future viability and wider diffusion depend on mutual trust and the long-term commitment of labour, management, and governments. Still, the consensus-building approach is seen as a remarkable achievement in Canada's adversarial institutional climate, with the potential of transforming the nature and direction of Canadian labour-management relationships.In bringing together a wide range of views on sector councils, this book is a singular resource for all those interested in industrial relations, labour economics, and public policy.
Table of Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
List of Sector Councils
Introductionp. 3
A Historical Perspective on Sector Councilsp. 33
The Development of Sector Councils in Canada: An Economic Perspectivep. 43
A Labour Perspective on Sector Councilsp. 61
A Canadian Business Perspective on Sectoral Human Resource Councilsp. 72
Human Resources Think for Themselves: The Experience of Unions in the Sectoral Skills Councilp. 99
The Configuration of Sectoral Human Resource Initiatives in Quebec in the 1990sp. 131
Ontario's Experiment with Sectoral Initiatives: Labour Market and Industrial Policy, 1985-1996p. 158
The Dynamics of Joint Governance: Historical and Institutional Implications for Sector Councilsp. 193
Sector Councils as Models of Shared Governance in Training and Adjustmentp. 209
The Canadian Steel Trade and Employment Congress: Old-fashioned Labour-Management Cooperation or an Innovation in Joint Governance?p. 234
Program Evaluation Criteria Applied to Sector Councilsp. 257
Sector Councils and Sectoral Corporatism: Viable? Desirable?p. 271
The Role of Sector Initiatives in the Canadian Industrial Relations Systemp. 295
Conclusion: Issues and Lessons from the Sector Council Experiencep. 317
Contributorsp. 331
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem