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Earth, water, air and fire [electronic resource] : studies in Canadian ethnohistory /
David T. McNab for Nin.Da.Waab. Jig.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c1998.
description
vi, 342 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0889202974 :
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c1998.
isbn
0889202974 :
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Proceedings of a conference held May 12-14, 1994, in Bkejwanong, Ont.
catalogue key
10501828
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David T. McNab is a public historian who has worked for over two decades on Aboriginal land and treaty rights issues in Canada. He is currently a claims advisor for Nin.Da.Waab.Jig., Walpole Island Heritage Centre, Bkejwanong First Nations, and an Honorary External Associate in the Frost Centre for Canadian Heritage and Development Studies at Trent University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The contributors use a holistic approach comprising the four elements--earth, water, air, and fire--to address the diverse themes and variations in First Nations communities across Canada.
Main Description
The contributors use a holistic approach comprising the four elements - earth, water, air, and fire - to address the diverse themes and variations in First Nations communities across Canada.
Main Description
The contributors use a holistic approach comprising the four elements-earth, water, air, and fire-to address the diverse themes and variations in First Nations communities across Canada.
Unpaid Annotation
Most Canadians know relatively little about First Nations citizens and their communities -- much less about their concerns and about their sheer diversity. Earth, Water, Air and Fire: Studies in Canadian Ethnohistory addresses the diverse themes and highlights the extensive variations in First Nations communities right across Canada, illuminating our understanding through practical applied methods.Twenty years ago the research in Aboriginal Studies concentrated on methodology, abstract arguments and definitions. Now, the four elements comprising the Aboriginal world -- Earth, Water, Air and Fire -- reflect a new approach -- an applied, holistic and differentiated approach.Earth Water, Air and Fire: Studies in Canadian Ethnohistory will be essential reading for everyone interested in Aboriginal studies and the future of Canada. It should be read by all Canadians.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Aboriginal Perspectives
Bkejwanong--"The Place Where the Waters Divide": A Perspective on Earth, Water, Air and Firep. 9
Art and Amerindian Worldviewsp. 21
Bkejwanong Territory
"Water Is Her Life Blood": The Waters of Bkejwanong and the Treaty-Making Processp. 35
"Under the Earth": The Expropriation and Attempted Sale of the Oil and Gas Rights of the Walpole Island First Nation during World War Ip. 65
The Reverend Simpson Brigham (1875-1926): The Worlds of Henry Ford and Simpson Brigham Collidep. 81
Mi'kma'ki and the Mi'kmaq Nation
Mi'kmaq Fishing in the Maritimes: A Historical Overviewp. 95
"We Cannot Work Without Food": Nova Scotia Indian Policy and Mi'kmaq Agriculture, 1783-1867p. 115
Glooscap Encounters Silas T. Rand: A Baptist Missionary on the Folkloric Fringep. 127
Ontario: History, Law and Sovereignty
Colonizing a People: Mennonite Settlement in Waterloo Townshipp. 145
The Six Nations Confederacy, Aboriginal Sovereignty and Ontario Aboriginal Law: 1790-1860p. 181
The Uses and Abuses of Power in Two Ontario Residential Schools: The Mohawk Institute and Mount Elginp. 231
The Crown Domain and the Self-Governing Presence in Northern Ontariop. 245
The North, Gender and Aboriginal Governance
Some Comments upon the Marked Differences in the Representations of Chipewyan Women in Samuel Hearne's Field Notes and His Published Journalp. 263
Is This Apartheid? Aboriginal Reserves and Self-Government in Canada, 1960-82p. 275
The Sechelt and Nunavut Agreements: Evolutionary and Revolutionary Approaches to Self-Governmentp. 301
Retrospect
A Meeting Ground of Earth, Water, Air and Firep. 325
Contributorsp. 329
Indexp. 333
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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