Catalogue


Dominion of youth [electronic resource] : adolescence and the making of a modern Canada, 1920-1950 /
Cynthia Comacchio.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Waterloo, Ontario : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2006.
description
ix, 298 p.
ISBN
0889204888
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Waterloo, Ontario : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2006.
isbn
0889204888
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10501476
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Sir John A. McDonald Prize, CAN, 2008 : Nominated
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making ofModern Canada, 1920 to 1950 captures what it meant foryoung Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of lifewithin the context of a young nation caught up in theself-formation and historic transformation that wouldmake modern Canada. Because the young at this time wereseen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and thesource of its possible degeneration, new policies andinstitutions were developed to deal with the ''problem ofyouth.'' This history considers how young Canadians madethe transition to adulthood during a period that was''developmental''--both for youth and for a nation alsoworking toward individuation. During the years consideredhere, those who occupied this ''dominion'' of youth wouldsee their experiences more clearly demarcated bygeneration and culture than ever before. With this book,Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study ofadolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada anddemonstrates how young Canadians of the period became thenation's first modern teenagers.
Main Description
Adolescence, like childhood, is more than a biologically defined life stage: it is also a sociohistorical construction. The meaning and experience of adolescence are reformulated according to societal needs, evolving scientific precepts, and national aspirations relative to historic conditions. Although adolescence was by no means a "discovery" of the early twentieth century, it did assume an identifiably modern form during the years between the Great War and 1950. The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making of Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950 captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the "problem of youth." This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was "developmental"-both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this "dominion" of youth would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation's first modern teenagers.
Main Description
Adolescence, like childhood, is more than a biologically defined life stage: it is also a sociohistorical construction. The meaning and experience of adolescence are reformulated according to societal needs, evolving scientific precepts, and national aspirations relative to historic conditions. Although adolescence was by no means a "discovery" of the early twentieth century, it did assume an identifiably modern form during the years between the Great War and 1950. The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making of Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the "problem of youth." This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was "developmental"-both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this "dominion" of youth would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation's first modern teenagers.
Main Description
Adolescence, like childhood, is more than a biologically defined life stage: it is also a sociohistorical construction. The meaning and experience of adolescence are reformulated according to societal needs, evolving scientific precepts, and national aspirations relative to historic conditions. Although adolescence was by no means a "discovery" of the early twentieth century, it did assume an identifiably modern form during the years between the Great War and 1950.The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making of Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the "problem of youth." This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was "developmental"-both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this "dominion" of youth would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation's first modern teenagers.
Main Description
The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making of Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950 captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the ''problem of youth.'' This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was ''developmental''--both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this ''dominion'' of youth would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation's first modern teenagers.
Main Description
This book captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the 'problem of youth'. This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was 'developmental' -- both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this 'dominion' of youth would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation's first modern teenagers.
Unpaid Annotation
Adolescence, like childhood, is more than a biologically defined life stage: it is also a sociohistorical construction. The meaning and experience of adolescence are reformulated according to societal needs, evolving scientific precepts, and national aspirations relative to historic conditions. Although adolescence was by no means a "discovery" of the early twentieth century, it did assume an identifiably modern form during the years between the Great War and 1950. The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making of a Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950 captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the "problem of youth." This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was "developmental"-both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this "dominion of youth" would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation's first modern teenagers.
Table of Contents
In Theory: "The Problem of Modern Youth"
In the Home: Intergenerational Relations
In Love: Dating and Mating
At School: The Culture of "Modern High"
On the job: Training and Earning
At Play: Fads, Fashions and Fun
At the Club: Youth Organisations
Conclusion: Youth's Dominion
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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