Catalogue


Between consenting peoples [electronic resource] : political community and the meaning of consent /
edited by Jeremy Webber and Colin M. Macleod.
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, c2010.
description
viii, 269 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0774818832, 9780774818834
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, c2010.
isbn
0774818832
9780774818834
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The meanings of consent / Jeremy Webber -- The challenges of consent in indigenous contexts. Living together : Gitksan legal reasoning as a foundation for consent / Val Napoleon ; "Thou wilt not die of hunger- for I bring thee merchandise : consent, intersocietal normativity, and the exchange of food at York Factory, 1682-1763/77 / Janna Promislow ; The complexity of the object of consent : some Australian stories / Tim Rowse -- Reconceiving consent in political and legal philosophy. Indigenous peoples and political legitimacy / Margaret Moore ; Consent, legitimacy, and the foundation of political and legal authority / David Dyzenhaus ; Consent or contestation? / Duncan Ivison ; Beyond consent and disagreement : why law's authority is not just about will / Andrée Boisselle -- Concluding reflections. Consent, hegemony, and dissent in treaty negotiations / James Tully.
general note
"The chapters in this volume are drawn from papers presented at the very first Demcon workshop, "Concent as the foundation for political community," held at the University of Victoria in October 2004.
catalogue key
10495421
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Consent has long been used to establish the legitimacy of society. But when one asks -- who consented? how? to what type of community? -- consent becomes very elusive, more myth than reality. In Between Consenting Peoples, leading scholars in legal and political theory examine the different ways in which consent has been used to justify political communities and the authority of law, especially in indigenous-nonindigenous relations. They explore the kind of consent -- the kind of attachment -- that might ground political community and establish a fair relationship between indigenous and nonindigenous peoples.
Long Description
Consent has long been used to establish the legitimacy of society.But when one asks - who consented? how? to what type ofcommunity? - consent becomes very elusive, more myth thanreality. This is particularly true when focusing on the relationshipbetween indigenous and nonindigenous peoples. In Between Consenting Peoples, leading scholars in legal andpolitical theory look at the various meanings that have been attachedto consent as the foundation for political community and law,especially in indigenous contexts. From historical examples topolitical and legal theory, the authors examine the language of consentand how consent has ordered indigenous societies and shaped theirrelationships with governments. They also explore the kind of consent- the kind of attachment - that might ground politicalcommunity and establish a fair relationship between indigenous andnonindigenous peoples. In doing so, they draw perspectives fromindigenous relations into the heart of political theory.
Main Description
Consent has long been used to establish the legitimacy of society. But when one asks -- who consented? how? to what type of community?-- consent becomes very elusive, more myth than reality. In Between Consenting Peoples,leading scholars in legal and political theory examine the different ways in which consent has been used to justify political communities and the authority of law, especially in indigenous-nonindigenous relations. They explore the kind of consent -- the kind of attachment -- that might ground political community and establish a fair relationship between indigenous and nonindigenous peoples.
Main Description
This book weaves together themes of political and legal philosophy and indigenous studies that are not often considered together ... By doing so, it successfully contributes to an ongoing and widening debate about the foundations of the state in postcolonial settings. -- Mark Walters, Faculty of Law, Queen's University
Description for Teachers/Educators
This book will appeal to students and scholars of political theory,law, history, and Native studies and anyone concerned with theconditions of legitimate governance.

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