Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Anglo-Saxon England in Icelandic medieval texts [electronic resource] /
Magnús Fjalldal.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2005.
description
xi, 162 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802038379 (bound)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2005.
isbn
0802038379 (bound)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
language note
Includes some text in Icelandic.
catalogue key
10494017
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [149]-157) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Reader
Medieval Icelandic authors wrote a great deal on the subject of England and the English. This new work by Magn's Fjalldal is the first to provide an overview of what Icelandic medieval texts have to say about Anglo-Saxon England in respect to its language, culture, history, and geography.Some of the texts Fjalldal examines include family sagas, the shorter ? ttir, the histories of Norwegian and Danish kings, and the Icelandic lives of Anglo-Saxon saints. Fjalldal finds that in response to a hostile Norwegian court and kings, Icelandic authors A? from the early thirteenth century onwards (although they were rather poorly informed about England before 1066) A? created a largely imaginary country where friendly, generous, although rather ineffective kings living under constant threat welcomed the assistance of saga heroes to solve their problems.The England of Icelandic medieval texts is more of a stage than a country, and chiefly functions to provide saga heroes with fame abroad. Since many of these texts are rarely examined outside of Iceland or in the English language, FjalldalA's book is important for scholars of both medieval Norse culture and Anglo-Saxon England.
Description for Reader
Medieval Icelandic authors wrote a great deal on the subject of England and the English. This new work by Magnús Fjalldal is the first to provide an overview of what Icelandic medieval texts have to say about Anglo-Saxon England in respect to its language, culture, history, and geography.Some of the texts Fjalldal examines include family sagas, the shorter þættir, the histories of Norwegian and Danish kings, and the Icelandic lives of Anglo-Saxon saints. Fjalldal finds that in response to a hostile Norwegian court and kings, Icelandic authors - from the early thirteenth century onwards (although they were rather poorly informed about England before 1066) - created a largely imaginary country where friendly, generous, although rather ineffective kings living under constant threat welcomed the assistance of saga heroes to solve their problems.The England of Icelandic medieval texts is more of a stage than a country, and chiefly functions to provide saga heroes with fame abroad. Since many of these texts are rarely examined outside of Iceland or in the English language, Fjalldal's book is important for scholars of both medieval Norse culture and Anglo-Saxon England.
Main Description
Medieval Icelandic authors wrote a great deal on the subject of England and the English. This new work by Magnús Fjalldal is the first to provide an overview of what Icelandic medieval texts have to say about Anglo-Saxon England in respect to its language, culture, history, and geography. Some of the texts Fjalldal examines include family sagas, the shorter þættir, the histories of Norwegian and Danish kings, and the Icelandic lives of Anglo-Saxon saints. Fjalldal finds that in response to a hostile Norwegian court and kings, Icelandic authors - from the early thirteenth century onwards (although they were rather poorly informed about England before 1066) - created a largely imaginary country where friendly, generous, although rather ineffective kings living under constant threat welcomed the assistance of saga heroes to solve their problems. The England of Icelandic medieval texts is more of a stage than a country, and chiefly functions to provide saga heroes with fame abroad. Since many of these texts are rarely examined outside of Iceland or in the English language, Fjalldal's book is important for scholars of both medieval Norse culture and Anglo-Saxon England.
Main Description
Medieval Icelandic authors wrote a great deal on the subject of England and the English. This new work by Magns Fjalldal is the first to provide an overview of what Icelandic medieval texts have to say about Anglo-Saxon England in respect to its language, culture, history, and geography.Some of the texts Fjalldal examines include family sagas, the shorter ttir, the histories of Norwegian and Danish kings, and the Icelandic lives of Anglo-Saxon saints. Fjalldal finds that in response to a hostile Norwegian court and kings, Icelandic authors ? from the early thirteenth century onwards (although they were rather poorly informed about England before 1066) ? created a largely imaginary country where friendly, generous, although rather ineffective kings living under constant threat welcomed the assistance of saga heroes to solve their problems.The England of Icelandic medieval texts is more of a stage than a country, and chiefly functions to provide saga heroes with fame abroad. Since many of these texts are rarely examined outside of Iceland or in the English language, Fjalldal's book is important for scholars of both medieval Norse culture and Anglo-Saxon England.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
Old English and Old Norse: The Evidence of Gunnlaugs saga, Fyrsta malfroe[characters not reproducible]iritger[characters not reproducible]in, and Hauksbokp. 3
Old English and Old Norse: The Evidence of Other Sourcesp. 12
General Knowledge and Attitudes about Anglo-Saxon England and Its Customsp. 22
History - Heimskringla, Agrip af Noregskonunga sogum, Fagrskinna, Knytlinga saga, and Morkinskinna: From Haraldr Fair-hair to the Sons of Cnutp. 33
History - Heimskringla, Agrip af Noregskonunga sogum, Fagrskinna, Knytlinga saga, and Morkinskinna: From Magnus the Good to Eysteinn Haraldssonp. 54
History - Egils sagap. 69
History - Breta sogur, Saga Osvalds konungs hins helga, Dunstanus saga, and Jatvar[characters not reproducible]ar sagap. 83
Kings and Courtsp. 101
The Hero and His Deedsp. 113
Conclusionp. 121
Notesp. 125
Bibliographyp. 149
Indexp. 159
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem