Catalogue

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Bamboo stone : the evolution of a Chinese medical elite /
Karen Minden.
edition
Reprinted / with new preface and expanded photo essay.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo ; London : University of Toronto Press, 1994, 2014.
description
xiv, 201 pages, 46 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map, portraits.
ISBN
0802005500
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo ; London : University of Toronto Press, 1994, 2014.
isbn
0802005500
contents note
1. The Framework -- 2. The Setting: Sichuan Province and the Mission Stations -- 3. The West China Union University College of Medicine and Dentistry -- 4. Evangelists of Science: The Medical Missionaries -- 5. The 'Receivers': Chinese Students at the College of Medicine and Dentistry -- 6. Alumni and the People's Republic of China: Birds in a Cage -- 7. From Pariah to 'Backbone': The Changing Role of Western-Trained Intellectuals -- Appendix: Questionnaire for Alumni of WCUU.
catalogue key
10386529
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 165-190) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-01:
Minden (Univ. of Manitoba) adds to the understanding of the role of Canadian medical missionaries who developed a medical and dental training program in Chengdu, Sichuan, China, and their influence as agents of change through the tumultuous 20th century. Making use of extensive interviews and archival work in China, she also examines the evolution of this medical training program and the background, motivations, and campus life of both students and faculty. Evangelist Canadian doctors eventually became medical educators who were devoted to Christian principles but were reluctant to evangelize non-Christian Chinese. Convinced of the superiority of rational thought, science, and technology, the West China Union University assumed that tertiary-care institutions and research-oriented medical instruction would provide a basis for a modern medical system, which would in turn train China's future medical profession. This elitist approach, coupled with a student body drawn mostly from intellectual and merchant families, did not answer China's immediate need for public sanitation and primary health care. Contains two maps, five tables, and 30 photographs. No Chinese glossary. Appropriate for general and undergraduate reading. H. T. Wong; Eastern Washington University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 1994
Choice, January 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Table of Contents
Maps, Figure, Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 3
The Frameworkp. 13
The Setting: Sichuan Province and the Mission Stationsp. 26
The West China Union University College of Medicine and Dentistryp. 45
Evangelists of Science: The Medical Missionariesp. 77
The 'Receivers': Chinese Students at the College of Medicine and Dentistryp. 106
Alumni and the People's Republic of China: Birds in a Cagep. 124
From Pariah to 'Backbone': The Changing Role of Western-Trained Intellectualsp. 146
Appendix: Questionnaire for Alumni of WCUUp. 159
Illustration Creditsp. 164
Notesp. 165
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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