Catalogue


Substance use disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces /
Committee on Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management of Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces, Board on the Health of Select Populations, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies ; Charles P. O'Brien, Maryjo Oster, and Emily Morden, editors.
imprint
Washington, DC : National Academies Press, [2013].
description
xxv, 389 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0309260558, 9780309260558
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Washington, DC : National Academies Press, [2013].
isbn
0309260558
9780309260558
contents note
Summary -- Introduction -- Understanding substance use disorders in The Military -- The Military Health System -- Changing Standards Of Care For Substance Use Disorders -- Best Practices in Prevention, Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders -- Policies and Programs on Substance Use Disorders -- Access to Care for Substance Use Disorders -- Substance Use Disorder Workforce -- Conclusions and Recommendations -- Appendixes.
catalogue key
10372608
 
Also issued online.
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Problems stemming from the misuse and abuse of alcohol and other drugs are by no means a new phenomenon, although the face of the issues has changed in recent years. National trends indicate substantial increases in the abuse of prescription medications. These increases are particularly prominent within the military, a population that also continues to experience long-standing issues with alcohol abuse. The problem of substance abuse within the military has come under new scrutiny in the context of the two concurrent wars in which the United States has been engaged during the past decade--in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom) and Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn). Increasing rates of alcohol and other drug misuse adversely affect military readiness, family readiness, and safety, thereby posing a significant public health problem for the Department of Defense (DoD). To better understand this problem, DoD requested that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) assess the adequacy of current protocols in place across DoD and the different branches of the military pertaining to the prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs).Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces reviews the IOM's task of assessing access to SUD care for service members, members of the National Guard and Reserves, and military dependents, as well as the education and credentialing of SUD care providers, and offers specific recommendations to DoD on where and how improvements in these areas could be made.
Long Description
Problems stemming from the misuse and abuse of alcohol and other drugs are by no means a new phenomenon, although the face of the issues has changed in recent years. National trends indicate substantial increases in the abuse of prescription medications. These increases are particularly prominent within the military, a population that also continues to experience long-standing issues with alcohol abuse. The problem of substance abuse within the military has come under new scrutiny in the context of the two concurrent wars in which the United States has been engaged during the past decade--in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom) and Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn). Increasing rates of alcohol and other drug misuse adversely affect military readiness, family readiness, and safety, thereby posing a significant public health problem for the Department of Defense (DoD). To better understand this problem, DoD requested that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) assess the adequacy of current protocols in place across DoD and the different branches of the military pertaining to the prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs). Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces reviews the IOM's task of assessing access to SUD care for service members, members of the National Guard and Reserves, and military dependents, as well as the education and credentialing of SUD care providers, and offers specific recommendations to DoD on where and how improvements in these areas could be made.
Table of Contents
Acronyms and Abbreviationsp. xxi
Summaryp. 1
Introductionp. 15
Backgroundp. 16
Charge to the Committeep. 19
Approach to the Chargep. 20
Organization of the Reportp. 21
Referencesp. 22
Understanding Substance Use Disorders in the Militaryp. 25
Understanding Substance Use Disordersp. 25
Scope of the Problemp. 29
Development of Military Substance Abuse Policy: A Brief Overviewp. 30
Composition and Sociodemographic Characteristics of the Armed Forcesp. 32
Prevalence of Substance Use in the Militaryp. 38
Health Care Burden of Substance Use Disordersp. 55
Conceptual Approach to Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment of Alcohol Use Problemsp. 60
Summaryp. 62
Referencesp. 64
The Military Health Systemp. 69
Eligibility for Carep. 70
Direct Care: Military Treatment Facilitiesp. 74
Purchased Care: TRICAREp. 78
Care for Substance Use Disorders for Military Service Members and Dependentsp. 80
Summaryp. 83
Referencesp. 83
Changing Standards of Care for Substance Use Disordersp. 85
Health Care Reform and Parity Requirementsp. 85
Office of National Drug Control Policy's National Drug Control Strategyp. 89
National Quality Forum's Voluntary Consensus Standardsp. 91
Practice Improvement Effortsp. 91
Clinical Practice Guideline of the Department of Veterans Affairs and DoDp. 93
Summaryp. 94
Referencesp. 94
Best Practices in Prevention, Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Substance Use Disordersp. 97
Preventionp. 97
Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatmentp. 107
Summaryp. 124
Referencesp. 124
Policies and Programs on Substance Use Disordersp. 137
Department of Defensep. 139
Air Forcep. 148
Armyp. 153
Navyp. 159
Marine Corpsp. 162
SUD Policies and Programs for Military Dependents in the Direct Care Systemp. 165
Summary of Key Findingsp. 169
Referencesp. 180
Access to Care for Substance Use Disordersp. 185
Framework for Access to Carep. 186
Care Availability, Access, and Utilization in the Direct Care Systemp. 192
Care Availability, Access, and Utilization in the Veterans Health Administrationp. 203
Care Availability, Access, and Utilization in the Purchased Care Systemp. 206
Summary of Key Findingsp. 216
Referencesp. 223
Substance Use Disorder Workforcep. 227
Air Force Workforcep. 228
Army Workforcep. 231
Navy Workforcep. 232
Marine Corps Workforcep. 235
DoD Efforts to Review Staffing Requirementsp. 237
Summary of Key Findingsp. 238
Referencesp. 244
Conclusions and Recommendationsp. 247
Increasing Emphasis on Efforts to Prevent Substance Use Disordersp. 249
Developing Strategies for Identifying, Adopting, Implementing, and Disseminating Evidence-Based Programs and Best Practices for SUD Carep. 254
Increasing Access to Carep. 260
Strengthening the SUD Workforcep. 265
Conclusionp. 269
Referencesp. 269
Appendixes
Study Activitiesp. 271
S. 459 (111th): SUPPORT for Substance Use Disorders Actp. 283
Section 596 of Public Law 111-84, October 28, 2009p. 297
Program Reviewsp. 305
Features of TRICARE and Related Purchased Care Plansp. 357
Workforce Standards for Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Carep. 361
Access Standards for TRICARE Prime Enrolleesp. 369
Levels of Carep. 371
Summary of Policy-Relevant Strategies for the Prevention of Alcohol-Related Problemsp. 373
Biosketches of Committee Members and Staffp. 381
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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