Catalogue


Diamond Hill : memoirs of growing up in a Hong Kong squatter village /
Feng Chi-shun.
imprint
Hong Kong : Blacksmith Books, ©2009.
description
195 pages : illustrations, map ; 20 cm
ISBN
9789881774248, 9881774241
format(s)
Book
Holdings
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More Details
imprint
Hong Kong : Blacksmith Books, ©2009.
isbn
9789881774248
9881774241
catalogue key
10349435
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Diamond Hill will invite comparisons with Martin Booth's 2004 autobiography Gweilo. If you enjoyed the latter, you will likely find the former similarly absorbing because the $$$ was, for many a 'gweilo', the inaccessible yet intriguing face an altogether edgier Hong Kor
Summaries
Main Description
Diamond Hill was one of the poorest and most backward of villages in Hong Kong at a time when Hong Kong itself was poor and backward. We moved there in 1956 when I was almost 10. I left when I was 19. Those were the formative years of my life. It's a time that I remember well and cherish. Gambling and gangsters; fires and food stalls; the Walled City and its 'white powder'. This memoir of a native son of a Kowloon squatter village - the first book ever on Diamond Hill - presents the early days of a life shaped by a now-extinct community. Feng Chi-shun's sharp recollections of his humble upbringing are filled with warmth, humour, and an abundance of insights into a low-income Hong Kong neighbourhood that no longer exists, but remains close to the hearts of many who lived there. Diamond Hill will invite comparisons with Martin Booth's 2004 hit Gweilo. If you enjoyed the latter, you will likely find the former similarly absorbing, because the young Feng was, for many a "gweilo", the inaccessible yet intriguing face of an altogether edgier Hong Kong.
Main Description
Gambling and gangsters; fires and food stalls; the Walled City and its 'white powder'. This memoir of a native son of a Kowloon-side squatter village - the first book ever on Diamond Hill, in either Chinese or English - presents the early days of a life shaped by a now-extinct community. Feng Chi-shun's sharp recollections of his humble upbringing are filled with warmth, humour and an abundance of insights into a low-income refugee neighbourhood that no longer exists, but remains close to the hearts of many who lived there. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prologuep. 7
Photographsp. 11
The neighbors and the neighborhoodp. 15
Bus stopsp. 31
Schoolsp. 47
Firesp. 71
The food we atep. 79
The games we playedp. 91
Gamblingp. 103
Thugs and gangstersp. 121
A dog's lifep. 135
Hollywood in Diamond Hillp. 145
The Walled City and the white powderp. 161
Temple and churchesp. 175
Epiloguep. 183
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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