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The English in West Africa, 1681-1683 [electronic resource] /
edited by Robin Law.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press, c1997.
description
xix, 363 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0197261760 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press, c1997.
isbn
0197261760 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Continued by: The English in West Africa, 1685-1688.
catalogue key
10335340
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [350]-351) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-11:
From 1672 to 1698 the Royal African Company of England had a legal monopoly of trade with West Africa. Most surviving Company records, including extracts of correspondence from their West African headquarters at Cape Coast, are in the Public Records Office in London. The present volume of documents--heretofore available only in the Richard Rawlinson (1690-1775) manuscript collection at Oxford's Bodleian Library--is both more detailed and more local. It consists of the full text of letters written between 1681 and 1683 from outlying factories of the Company (mainly those on the Gold Coast) to Cape Coast. Subsequent volumes will cover the years 1684-89. This correspondence includes important, although scattered and limited, evidence on local African polities (especially Fante and Akwamu), but it is richest in its accounts of local Company activities. Information abounds on personnel matters (illness, incompetence, malfeasance, special pleading); the type and value of trade goods, as well as foodstuffs and other supplies, needed from headquarters to meet local demand; the frequent difficulties and delays in obtaining these; and local conditions of trade, including the many circumstances that obstructed the flow of gold and slaves, the prime objects of Company trade. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. R. Atkinson; University of South Carolina
Reviews
Review Quotes
'historians of pre-colonial West Africa and of the Atlantic slave tradehave become deeply indebted to Robin Law.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.
'historians of pre-colonial West Africa and of the Atlantic slave trade have become deeply indebted to Robin Law.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.
'In his latest book, based on the local correspondence in Africa of officers of the Royal African Company ... Law provides us with a further example of his skills as an editor, anotator and interpreter of a major body of historical documents.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.
'In the age of microfilm... the relative ease of travel to archivalsources, and the Internet, does the African historical community need anotherbook of documents? Without hesitation my answer is a resounding Yes! TheRawlinson manuscripts may be the most important source of historical informationabout this area for the last two decades of the seventeenth century... the greatbenefit of the very valuable collection of documents in The English in WestAfrica, 1681-1683, and the collections of primary materials cited in footnoteone, is the potential for building an excellent ethnographic and historicalpicture of many aspects of life on the Gold Coast. Cheers to Robin Law and theBritish Academy for enhancing the resources in print.'Harvey M. Feinberg, The International Journal of African Historical Studies,Vol.32 No.1
'Once completed, Laws edition of the Rawlinson manuscripts will place at the disposal of historians a set of materials that provides hitherto unimaginable opportunities to trace the micro-history of commercial relations at the Gold Coast and adjacent areas during the period when the Englishbegan to dominate the slave trade with this region.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.
'One looks forward with anticipation to the promised further volumes inthis fascinating series.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.
'One looks forward with anticipation to the promised further volumes in this fascinating series.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.
'painstakingly organised and annotated ... includes a concordance, bibliography and detailed index of places, people, ships and selected topics ... This supplemental material is of great value.'Stephen D. Behrendt, African History, Vol.41, 2000.
"Robin Law ... has undertaken to provide a text edition of these letters,which is certain to increase their value because it will increase their use.This collection of letters is so extensive that the present volume is only thefirst of three, perhaps even four, that Law proposes to prepare. We can judgethe work both as a historical source and as a text edition.'David Henige, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History
'Robin Law ... has undertaken to provide a text edition of these letters, which is certain to increase their value because it will increase their use. This collection of letters is so extensive that the present volume is only the first of three, perhaps even four, that Law proposes to prepare.We can judge the work both as a historical source and as a text edition.'David Henige, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History
Robin Law is to be commended for editing the Rawlinson collection in an important, scholarly, three-volume set.
'The English in West Africa, 1681-1683 is an important volume, and Law organises a complex set of documents in a straightforward and accessible manner.'Stephen D. Behrendt, African History, Vol.41, 2000.
'There is no doubt that this material is of real significance .. its major value for historians of West Africa will be the detailed information about local African traders and rulers who provide the supplies of gold and slaves, and the conditions of local West African society, politics, andwarfare.'John Flint, The International History Review, XXI.2 June 1999
"There is no doubt that this material is of real significance." JohnFlint, The International History Review, XXI, 2: June 1999
"There is no doubt that this material is of real significance." John Flint, The International History Review, XXI, 2: June 1999
'this volume returns to the Gold Coast, making available a valuable and hitherto fugitive source for the history of what is already one of the best documented regions of pre-colonial Africa ... The British Academy and Robin Law are to be congratulated on reinvigorating the venerable FontesHistoriae Africanae project, and on the basis of this volume we can only look forward to future publications.'John Parker, Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies
'This volume will be of value to scholars who analyze alliances between Africans and Europeans, and the impact of the slave and non-slave trades on local societies ... of most interest are the day-to-day marketing arrangements between Africans and Europeans detailed in the correspondence.'Stephen D. Behrendt, African History, Vol.41, 2000.
'painstakingly organised and annotated ... includes a concordance, bibliography and detailed index of places, people, ships and selected topics ... This supplemental material is of great value.'Stephen D. Behrendt, African History, Vol.41, 2000.'The English in West Africa, 1681-1683 is an important volume, and Law organises a complex set of documents in a straightforward and accessible manner.'Stephen D. Behrendt, African History, Vol.41, 2000.'This volume will be of value to scholars who analyze alliances between Africans and Europeans, and the impact of the slave and non-slave trades on local societies ... of most interest are the day-to-day marketing arrangements between Africans and Europeans detailed in the correspondence.'Stephen D. Behrendt, African History, Vol.41, 2000.'historians of pre-colonial West Africa and of the Atlantic slave trade have become deeply indebted to Robin Law.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.'In his latest book, based on the local correspondence in Africa of officers of the Royal African Company ... Law provides us with a further example of his skills as an editor, anotator and interpreter of a major body of historical documents.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.'Once completed, Laws edition of the Rawlinson manuscripts will place at the disposal of historians a set of materials that provides hitherto unimaginable opportunities to trace the micro-history of commercial relations at the Gold Coast and adjacent areas during the period when the English began to dominate the slave trade with this region.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.'One looks forward with anticipation to the promised further volumes in this fascinating series.'David Richardson, Slavery and Abolition, Vol.30, No.3.'There is no doubt that this material is of real significance .. its major value for historians of West Africa will be the detailed information about local African traders and rulers who provide the supplies of gold and slaves, and the conditions of local West African society, politics, and warfare.'John Flint, The International History Review, XXI.2 June 1999'Robin Law ... has undertaken to provide a text edition of these letters, which is certain to increase their value because it will increase their use. This collection of letters is so extensive that the present volume is only the first of three, perhaps even four, that Law proposes to prepare. We can judge the work both as a historical source and as a text edition.'David Henige, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History'this volume returns to the Gold Coast, making available a valuable and hitherto fugitive source for the history of what is already one of the best documented regions of pre-colonial Africa ... The British Academy and Robin Law are to be congratulated on reinvigorating the venerable Fontes Historiae Africanae project, and on the basis of this volume we can only look forward to future publications.'John Parker, Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies'In the age of microfilm... the relative ease of travel to archival sources, and the Internet, does the African historical community need another book of documents? Without hesitation my answer is a resounding Yes! The Rawlinson manuscripts may be the most important source of historical information about this area for the last two decades of the seventeenth century... the great benefit of the very valuable collection of documents in The English in WestAfrica, 1681-1683, and the collections of primary materials cited in footnote one, is the potential for building an excellent ethnographic and historical picture of many aspects of life on the Gold Coast. Cheers to Robin Law and the British Academy for enhancing the resources in print.'Harvey M. Feinberg, The International Journal of African Historical Studies, Vol.32 No.1
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1998
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The letter-books of the Royal African Company of England provide a substantial source of mateial on English trade in West Africa in the late 17th century. This book presents the original texts in full, accompanied by extensive explanatory notes.
Main Description
The letter-books of the Royal African Company of England form the most substantial and important source of material on English trade in West Africa in the late seventeenth century. The original texts, covering the period 1681-1699, are being published in full in three or four volumes. This first volume contains the letters for the years 1681-1683.
Main Description
The letter-books of the Royal African Company of England form the most substantial and important source of material on English trade in West Africa in the late seventeenth century. The Royal African Company held a legal monopoly of English trade with West Africa, principally in gold and slaves for the American colonies. The correspondence among the Company's local agents is exceptionally detailed in its coverage of the day-to-day operation of their trade and theirinteractions with local African societies - especially on the Gold Coast (Ghana). The letter-books, never previously printed, cover the period 1681-1699. The original texts are being published in full, with extensive explanatory commentary, in three or four volumes. This first volume contains the letters for the years 1681-1683.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Glossary
Sekondip. 1
Komendap. 22
Anashanp. 64
Anomabup. 92
Egyap. 143
Winnebap. 150
James Fort, Accrap. 153
Offra and Whydahp. 216
Shipsp. 259
Concordancep. 335
Bibliographyp. 350
Indexesp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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