Catalogue


Boitano's edge : inside the real world of figure skating /
written by Brian Boitano with Suzanne Harper ; introduction by Peggy Fleming.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York, N.Y. : Simon & Schuster, 1997.
description
144 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm
ISBN
0689819153, 9780689819155
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York, N.Y. : Simon & Schuster, 1997.
isbn
0689819153
9780689819155
abstract
Olympic ice skating champion Brian Boitano describes the sport of figure skating and his own experiences as a skater.
catalogue key
10229527
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 138) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
From Chapter Five: Competing After sixteen years of hard work training, sixteen years of practicing in cold rinks at dawn, sixteen years of jumping into the air, crashing to the ice, and getting up to do it all over again, I was standing on Olympic ice.My lifelong dream was about to come true -- or about to be dashed. I would know in four and a half minutes.The long program was the last phase of the competition. I had won the first phase of compulsory figures, which counted for thirty percent of the score; Canadian skater Brian Orser had won the second phase of the short program, which counted for twenty percent. On that night, we were in a dead heat for the Olympic gold medal. Now we were set to skate the long program, and the final showdown -- what the press had dubbed the "Battle of the Brians" -- was about to take place.By the luck of the draw, I was skating first. That was my favorite position, I liked to set the standard that all the other skaters had to meet. But on this night, I knew that I had to skate the best performance of my life.My choreographer, Sandra Bezic, had created majestic and emotional programs for both my short and long programs. Before I stepped on the ice, she said, "It's your moment. Show them your soul."A lot of people don't realize that the judges come to practice sessions at competitions, so they've watched all the programs before the actual day of the competition. The judges aren't supposed to talk among themselves or compare notes; most of the time they sit in the stands and concentrate on watching each skater's program. I think that 's a good idea because its important to see how the skater skates on a regular basis. If you know that someone skates consistently well in practice and performs well in competition, you know he's a good skater.Skaters do think about impressing the judges when they're practicing at a competition. The better a skater performs in practice, the more the judges are going to prejudge and think, "He's doing so well." That's what it means when you hear people talk about which skater is "winning" the practice sessions. The judges have noticed which skater is doing the best during practice and have mentally placed that skater a little higher than the others.To keep up my confidence, I always tried to leave a practice with a good move. If I was having trouble with a jump, I'd try to do just one good one. I paced myself so that I wouldn't be exhausted and miss jumps at the end of the practice. If I was skating with an injury, I'd sometimes do just the preparation and entry, then visualize the jump itself I knew that if my entry was solid, my jump would be good.Skaters always wear workout clothes at a practice, never costumes. Sometimes they'll hang out and watch the other skaters practice. I never did that, but Linda used to watch to get an idea of who's doing what.The night before a competition, I'd usually eat pasta for dinner. I'd try as hard as I could to not think about the next day, because nervousness uses up so much energy. I didn't talk to Linda about what I was feeling because there didn't seem much point. After all, I'd just say, "I feel really nervous." Copyrightcopy; 1997 by Brian Boitano
First Chapter
From Chapter Five: Competing

After sixteen years of hard work training, sixteen years of practicing in cold rinks at dawn, sixteen years of jumping into the air, crashing to the ice, and getting up to do it all over again, I was standing on Olympic ice.

My lifelong dream was about to come true -- or about to be dashed. I would know in four and a half minutes.

The long program was the last phase of the competition. I had won the first phase of compulsory figures, which counted for thirty percent of the score; Canadian skater Brian Orser had won the second phase of the short program, which counted for twenty percent. On that night, we were in a dead heat for the Olympic gold medal. Now we were set to skate the long program, and the final showdown -- what the press had dubbed the "Battle of the Brians" -- was about to take place.

By the luck of the draw, I was skating first. That was my favorite position, I liked to set the standard that all the other skaters had to meet. But on this night, I knew that I had to skate the best performance of my life.

My choreographer, Sandra Bezic, had created majestic and emotional programs for both my short and long programs. Before I stepped on the ice, she said, "It's your moment. Show them your soul."

A lot of people don't realize that the judges come to practice sessions at competitions, so they've watched all the programs before the actual day of the competition. The judges aren't supposed to talk among themselves or compare notes; most of the time they sit in the stands and concentrate on watching each skater's program. I think that 's a good idea because its important to see how the skater skates on a regular basis. If you know that someone skates consistently well in practice and performs well in competition, you know he's a good skater.

Skaters do think about impressing the judges when they're practicing at a competition. The better a skater performs in practice, the more the judges are going to prejudge and think, "He's doing so well." That's what it means when you hear people talk about which skater is "winning" the practice sessions. The judges have noticed which skater is doing the best during practice and have mentally placed that skater a little higher than the others.

To keep up my confidence, I always tried to leave a practice with a good move. If I was having trouble with a jump, I'd try to do just one good one. I paced myself so that I wouldn't be exhausted and miss jumps at the end of the practice. If I was skating with an injury, I'd sometimes do just the preparation and entry, then visualize the jump itself I knew that if my entry was solid, my jump would be good.

Skaters always wear workout clothes at a practice, never costumes. Sometimes they'll hang out and watch the other skaters practice. I never did that, but Linda used to watch to get an idea of who's doing what.

The night before a competition, I'd usually eat pasta for dinner. I'd try as hard as I could to not think about the next day, because nervousness uses up so much energy. I didn't talk to Linda about what I was feeling because there didn't seem much point. After all, I'd just say, "I feel really nervous."

Copyright© 1997 by Brian Boitano



Excerpted from Boitano's Edge: Inside the Real World of Figure Skating by Brian Boitano, Suzanne Harper
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1997-12-08:
Just in time for the Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, Boitano joins fellow figure skaters Tara Lipinski and Michelle Kwan (see Children's Forecasts, Nov. 10) in offering a book about their popular sport. A former World, National and Olympic champion as well as a professional performer, Boitano has much to spotlight in his stellar career. But this stylish tome far exceeds the limitations of a formal biography: it's both fun and a valuable reference for any figure-skating enthusiast. Part scrapbook, part history book and all fascinating, the volume covers every angle of the sport, from those first tentative strokes on the ice to world-class competition. With an enthusiastic and knowledgeable tone, Boitano intertwines personal anecdotes with general skating information; sidebars pipe in specifics about such topics as the cost of costumes and rink etiquette. The book's large format allows not only for a profusion of crisp color photos but also for such appealing design elements as a time-lapse photo of a jump. Also included are a detailed glossary of skating slang, a section on how to judge a competition (with comments from a 40-year veteran) and a passage on blade sharpening (contributed by the master craftsman who handles Boitano's skates). Capsule biographies of famous skaters as well as an extensive listing of champions add to the heft here. Young skaters are sure to give this title a top score of 6.0. Ages 8-up. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Horn Book Magazine,
Publishers Weekly, December 1997
Booklist, February 1998
School Library Journal, April 1998
Horn Book Guide, September 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Olympic Gold Medalist Brian Boitano offers lively expert commentary on the popular sport of figure skating in this distinguished and inviting volume. Over 100 full-color photos as well as personal anecdotes illustrate this informative, in-depth, inside look at everything about the sport, from a first lesson to competing at an international level.
Authored Title
In this autobiography, Boitano tells about his life, the 1988 Olympics, his training programs, touring, & his preparation for competitions.
Authored Title
In this autobiography, Boitano tells about his life, the 1988 Olympics, his training program, touring, and his preparation for competitions.
Authored Title
In this autobiography, Boitano tells about his life, the 1988 Olympics, his training program, touring, & his preparation for competitions.
Long Description
This large format, full-color photo essay is the ultimate skating book for fans ages 8 and up. In an accessable and conversational tone Brian Boitano reveals what it is like to move up through the sport and compete at an international level. Brian Boitano's personal stories and anecdotes as well as his lively personal commentary illuminate the sport for young readers and skating fans of all ages. Here's everything you'll ever want to know about figure skating -- with Brian Boitano serving as the expert host.

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