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Meeting global challenges : German-U.S. innovation policy : summary of a symposium /
Charles W. Wessner, rapporteur ; Committee on Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century ; Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy ; Policy and Global Affairs ; National Research Council of the National Academies.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, 2012.
description
xx, 219 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
030926359X, 9780309263597
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, 2012.
isbn
030926359X
9780309263597
general note
Summary of symposium presentation and an introduction examining the policy issues raised in the conference, held by Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP).
abstract
While nations have always competed for territory, mineral riches, water, and other physical assets, they compete most vigorously today for technology-based innovations and the value that flows from them. Much of this value is based on creating scientific knowledge and transforming it into new products and services for the market. This process of innovation is complex and interdisciplinary. Sometimes it draws on the genius of individuals, but even then it requires sustained collective effort, often underpinned by significant national investments. Capturing the value of these investments to spur domestic economic growth and employment is a challenge in a world where the outputs of innovation disseminate rapidly. Those equipped to understand, apply, and profit from new knowledge and technical advances are increasingly able to capture the long-term economic benefits of growth and employment. In response to this new, more distributed innovation paradigm, the National Academies Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) convened leading academics, business leaders, and senior policymakers from Germany and the United States to examine the strengths and challenges of their innovation systems. More specifically, they met to compare their respective approaches to innovation, to learn from their counterparts about best practices and shared challenges, and to identify cooperative opportunities. The symposium was held in Berlin and organized jointly by the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) and the U.S. National Academies with support of the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) and the American Embassy in Berlin. Both U.S. and German participants described common challenges on a wide variety of issues ranging from energy security and climate change to low-emissions transportation, early-stage financing, and workforce training. While recognizing their differences in approach to these challenges, participants on both sides drew out valuable lessons from each other's policies and practices. Participants were also aware of the need to adapt to a new global environment where many countries have focused new policy measures and new resources to support innovative firms and promising industries. Meeting Global Challenges: U.S.-German Innovation Policy reviews the participants meeting and sets goals and recommendations for future policy.
catalogue key
10202262
 
Also available online.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 184-219).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
While nations have always competed for territory, mineral riches, water, and other physical assets, they compete most vigorously today for technology-based innovations and the value that flows from them. Much of this value is based on creating scientific knowledge and transforming it into new products and services for the market. This process of innovation is complex and interdisciplinary. Sometimes it draws on the genius of individuals, but even then it requires sustained collective effort, often underpinned by significant national investments. Capturing the value of these investments to spur domestic economic growth and employment is a challenge in a world where the outputs of innovation disseminate rapidly. Those equipped to understand, apply, and profit from new knowledge and technical advances are increasingly able to capture the long-term economic benefits of growth and employment. In response to this new, more distributed innovation paradigm, the National Academies Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) convened leading academics, business leaders, and senior policymakers from Germany and the United States to examine the strengths and challenges of their innovation systems. More specifically, they met to compare their respective approaches to innovation, to learn from their counterparts about best practices and shared challenges, and to identify cooperative opportunities. The symposium was held in Berlin and organized jointly by the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) and the U.S. National Academies with support of the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) and the American Embassy in Berlin. Both U.S. and German participants described common challenges on a wide variety of issues ranging from energy security and climate change to low-emissions transportation, early-stage financing, and workforce training. While recognizing their differences in approach to these challenges, participants on both sides drew out valuable lessons from each other's policies and practices. Participants were also aware of the need to adapt to a new global environment where many countries have focused new policy measures and new resources to support innovative firms and promising industries. Meeting Global Challenges: U.S.-German Innovation Policy reviews the participants meeting and sets goals and recommendations for future policy.
Main Description
As part of the review of Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century, the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) convened a major German-U.S. symposium in Berlin gathering leading officials, industry representatives, and academic analysts from Germany and the United States to explore common challenges, best practice in innovation policy, and opportunities for cooperation between Germany and the United States. The second of two twin symposia (the first held in Washington, DC), this event focused on mechanisms to support a domestic manufacturing industry, with a particular focus on the role of German Fraunhofer Institutes, and U.S. and German approaches to stimulating small business entrepreneurship in high-technology areas. The meeting also highlighted the different approaches taken by the United States and Germany regarding trade and export policies, with a focus on East Asia, and identified potential areas for U.S. German cooperation in biomedical research. This report includes a summary of the symposium presentations and an introduction examining the policy issues raised in the conference and placing them in a broader context. Rising to the Challenge: U.S. Innovation Policy for the Global Economy The culmination of the National Academies international study of Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century, this report provides a striking account of the challenges and opportunities faced by the United States in the face of global competition for the next generations that have guided U.S. policymaking for decades regarding America's ability to fully capitalize on its investments in science and innovation. The report gives an exceptionally comprehensive overview of the programs and policies in place around the world to build innovation-led economies and describes the deteriorating U.S. position in this international competitive landscape. A key argument is that the United States needs to renew its investments in the "pillars of U.S. innovation" if we are to capture economic value from our investments in research. Similarly, the United States needs to devote far more attention to understanding what the rest of the world is doing to nurture their economies. At the same time, the United States needs to make greater efforts to capture the outputs of U.S. investments in innovation, that is, to provide an environment that encourage the retention and growth of high-tech businesses and the high-quality jobs they bring. America's future economic growth and national security depend on renewed investments and sustained policy attention. Building the 21st Century: U.S.-China Cooperation on Science, Technology, and Innovation As part of the review of Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century, the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) convened a major U.S. China symposium in Washington to explore common challenges, best practice in innovation policy, and opportunities for cooperation between China and the United States in areas such as clean energy, information technologies, and health research. With participation from senior officials representing key Chinese government agencies such as the National Development and Reform Commission, the Ministry of Science and Technology, and the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology and matching representation from the U.S. government and industry leaders, the symposium provided an opportunity to learn about Chinese policy in key industrial sectors and for developing their innovation infrastructure and an opportunity to explore areas of mutual interest where international cooperation could prove beneficial. This report includes a summary of the symposium presentations and an introduction examining the issues and placing them in a broader content. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xv
Overviewp. 1
Proceedingsp. 31
Welcomep. 33
Opening Remarks for Germanyp. 39
Opening Remarks for the United Statesp. 43
Keynote Addressp. 46
Current Trends in Innovation Policyp. 50
U.S. Innovation Policy: New Initiativesp. 50
New Initiatives in German Innovation Policyp. 54
Policy Initiatives at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technologyp. 58
Discussionp. 61
Keynote Addressp. 53
Competition and Cooperation in a Global Economyp. 68
Chinese and Indian Investments and Economic Strategyp. 69
Innovation and Tradep. 73
Discussionp. 77
Human Resources, Competition for Manpower, and the Internationalization of Laborp. 79
The Human Resource Challengep. 79
A Microsoft Perspective on the United States and Europep. 85
Discussionp. 87
Growing Universities for the 21st Centuryp. 88
Challenges and Changes for German Research Institutionsp. 88
Growing the New Akron Universityp. 93
German Universities and the Role of the Excellence Initiativep. 97
Discussionp. 100
Roundtable-Competition and Cooperation: Systematic Challengesp. 101
Helping Small Business: Current Trends and Programsp. 105
The "Mittelstand" Programs and Innovation in Germanyp. 106
Small Business Innovation: Federal Investments to Cross the Valley of Deathp. 110
Discussionp. 115
Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurshipp. 117
New Initiatives in Early-Stage Finance in Germanyp. 118
The Clash of Innovation Cultures: The United States and Germanyp. 119
Trends and Challenges for Venture Capital in the United Statesp. 122
Discussionp. 125
Policies and Programs for CO2 Reductionp. 127
The "Morgenstadt" Conceptp. 129
U.S. Carbon Reduction Policiesp. 132
Climate Change and Innovation: Mitigation and Adaptation Measuresp. 135
Discussionp. 138
Building Electric Vehicle Industriesp. 140
U.S. Battery Initiative for Electric Drive Vehiclesp. 141
German Developments in Electric Vehiclesp. 143
Discussionp. 145
Medical/Biomedical Innovation for the 21st Centuryp. 147
Advancing Innovation and Convergence in Cancer Researchp. 147
Medicai/Biomedical Innovation for the 21st Centuryp. 151
Discussionp. 153
Policies and Programs to Build Solar Industriesp. 154
The German Solar Industryp. 154
U.S. Initiatives in Solar Energy Policyp. 158
Discussionp. 161
Roundtable-"Energy Change: What Are the Consequences for the German and U.S. Innovation Systems?"p. 165
Closing Remarksp. 174
Appendixes
Agendap. 177
Bibliographyp. 184
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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