Catalogue


The political economy of dual transformations [electronic resource] : market reform and democratization in Hungary /
David L. Bartlett.
imprint
Ann Arbor, Mich. : University of Michigan Press, c1997.
description
xv, 299 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0472107941 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Ann Arbor, Mich. : University of Michigan Press, c1997.
isbn
0472107941 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10201491
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Ed A. Hewett Book Prize, USA, 1998 : Won
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-09:
This institutionalist analysis, rich in factual detail, of Hungary's economic and political reforms in the 1980s and '90s, is a valuable addition to an already extensive literature about postcommunist transformation and somewhat parallels Daniel Gros and Alfred Steinherr's Winds of Change: Economic Transition in Central and Eastern Europe (1995). After explaining the communist regime's frustrations with macroeconomic stabilization and market reform prior to 1989, Bartlett (political science, Vanderbilt Univ.) discusses Hungary's postcommunist price and trade liberalization, privatization, and--in particular detail--fiscal and monetary stabilization policies. He thereby refutes an often stated view: that dual transformations of "democratization" and "marketization" are incompatible because the former will allow popular anger over inevitable economic hardships to frustrate the political decision making aimed at the latter. At least in Hungary's case, Bartlett argues quite convincingly, such a claim is not justified. The book's main weakness is poor organization, which results in too many repetitions of factual information and explanations throughout the text. Some tables; detailed footnote citations, but--surprising in a book derived from a doctoral dissertation--no bibliography. Recommended for economic and political science collections on European transition economies. Upper-division undergraduate and up. H. D. Renning; emeritus, California State University, Stanislaus
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 1997
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Summaries
Main Description
In the early 1990s, scholars voiced skepticism about the capacity of Eastern Europe's new democracies to manage simultaneous political and economic reform. They argued that the surge of popular participation following democratization would thwart efforts by successor governments to enact market reforms that imposed high costs on major elements of post-Communist society. David Bartlett challenges the conventional wisdom regarding the hazards of "dual transformations": far from hindering marketization, democratization facilitated it. Bartlett argues that the transition to democracy in East Central Europe lowered the political barriers to market reforms by weakening the ability of actors most vulnerable to marketization to manipulate the existing institutional structure to stop or slow down the process. Although the analysis focuses on Hungary, whose long history of market reforms makes it an ideal vehicle for assessing the impact of institutional change on reform policy, the author shows how his findings call into question the use of "shock therapy" and arguments, based on the experience in East Asia, that economic development and democratization are incompatible. This book will appeal to economists, political scientists, and others interested in transition problems in formerly communist countries, democratic transitions, and the politics of stabilization and adjustment. David L. Bartlett is Assistant Professor of Political Science, Vanderbilt University.
Unpaid Annotation
David Bartlett challenges the conventional wisdom regarding the hazards of "dual transformations": far from hindering marketization, democratization has facilitated it. Bartlett argues that the transition to democracy in East Central Europe lowered the political barriers to market reform by weakening the ability of the actors most vulnerable to marketization to stop or slow down the process. Although the analysis focuses on Hungary, whose long history of market reform makes it an ideal vehicle for assessing the impact of institutional change on reform policy, the author takes his argument further. His findings call into question the use of "shock therapy" as well as arguments, based on the experience of East Asian countries, that economic development and democratization are incompatible. This book will appeal to economists, political scientists, and others interested in transition problems in formerly communist countries, democratic transitions, and the politics of stabilization and adjustment.
Table of Contents
Acronyms
Tables
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
An Institutional Approach to Eastern Europe's Transition
Party and State Institutions in Dual Transformationsp. 11
Economic Reform in Communist Hungary, 1979-89
Macroeconomic Stabilization under Reform Communismp. 55
Structural Adjustment and Market Socialismp. 99
Economic Reform in Democratic Hungary, 1990-94
Political Institutions and Hungary's Negotiated Transitionp. 141
Stabilization Policy in the Postcommunist Periodp. 165
Structural Adjustment in Hungary's New Democracyp. 205
Conclusions
Implications and Comparative Perspectivesp. 253
Appendixp. 283
Indexp. 287
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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