Catalogue


Building the Illinois innovation economy : summary of a symposium / rapporteur ; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies.
Charles W. Wessner,
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press 2013.
description
xvi, 208 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0309278694, 9780309278690
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press 2013.
isbn
0309278694
9780309278690
contents note
Preface -- Overview -- Proceedings -- Federal R&D Strategies -- Illinois Innovation Initiatives -- Innovation in Illinois: A Regional Case Study -- New Initiatives and Best Practices in Innovation -- The Industry Perspective on Illinois -- Roundtable: Best Practices, Lessons, and Opportunities -- Appendixes: Agenda, Biographies of Speakers, Participants List, Bibliography.
abstract
The symposium convened state officials and staff, business leaders, and leading national figures in early-stage finance, technology, engineering, education, and state and federal policies to review challenges, plans, and opportunities for innovation-led growth in Illinois. These symposium participants assessed Illinois' academic, industrial, and human resources, identified key policy issues, and engaged in a discussion of how the state might leverage regional development organizations, state initiatives, and national programs focused on manufacturing and innovation to support its economic development goals. The conference focuses on the biotechnology sector as a leading exemplar of an innovation driven industry. The partnerships among academia, industry, and government in biotechnology are illustrative of a wider set of initiatives underway in Illinois to grow the state's innovation ecosystem.
catalogue key
10192607
 
Bibliography: p. 187-208.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
Responding to the challenges of fostering regional growth and employment in an increasingly competitive global economy, many U.S. states and regions have developed programs to attract and grow companies as well as attract the talent and resources necessary to develop innovation clusters. These state and regionally based initiatives have a broad range of goals and increasingly include significant resources, often with a sector focus and often in partnership with foundations and universities. These are being joined by recent initiatives to coordinate and concentrate investments from a variety of federal agencies that provide significant resources to develop regional centers of innovation, business incubators, and other strategies to encourage entrepreneurship and high-tech development. Building the Illinois Innovation Economy is a study of selected state and regional programs to identify best practices with regard to their goals, structures, instruments, modes of operation, synergies across private and public programs, funding mechanisms and levels, and evaluation efforts. This report reviews selected state and regional efforts to capitalize on federal and state investments in areas of critical national needs. This review includes both efforts to strengthen existing industries as well as specific new technology focus areas such as nanotechnology, stem cells, and energy in order to improve our understanding of program goals, challenges, and accomplishments. As a part of this review, The Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives is convening a series of public workshops and symposia involving responsible local, state, and federal officials and other stakeholders. These meetings and symposia will enable an exchange of views, information, experience, and analysis to identify best practice in the range of programs and incentives adopted. Building the Illinois Innovation Economy summarizes discussions at these symposia, fact-finding meetings, and commissioned analyses of existing state and regional programs and technology focus areas, the committee will subsequently produce a final report with findings and recommendations focused on lessons, issues, and opportunities for complementary U.S. policies created by these state and regional initiatives.
Main Description
As part of the series on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy convened state officials and staff, business leaders, and leading national figures in early-stage finance, technology, engineering, education, and state and federal policies to review challenges, plans, and opportunities for innovation-led growth in Illinois. These symposium participants assessed Illinois' academic, industrial, and human resources, identified key policy issues, and engaged in a discussion of how the state might leverage regional development organization, state initiatives, and national programs focused on manufacturing and innovation to support its economic development goals. This report includes a summary of the symposium presentations and an overview section reviewing the issues discussed and placing them in a larget context. The culmination of the National Academies international study of Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century, this report provides a striking account of the challenges and opportunities faced by the United States in the face of global competition for the next generation of innovation. The report argues that today's new paradigm challenges the traditional assumptions that have guided U.S. policymaking for decades regarding America's ability to fully capitalize on its investments in science and innovation. The report gives an exceptionally comprehensive over-view of the programs and policies in place around the world to build innovation-led economies and describes the deteriorating U.S. position in this international competitive landscape. A key argument is that the United States needs to renew its investments in the "pillars of U.S. innovationö if we are to capture economic value from our investments in research. Similarly, the United States needs to devote far more attention to understanding what the rest of the world is doing to nurture their economies. At the same time, the United States needs to make greater efforts to capture the outputs of U.S. investments in innovation, that is, it provide an environment that encourages the retention and growth of high-tech businesses and the high-quality jobs they bring. America's future economic growth and national security depend on renewed investments and sustained policy attention. As part of series on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Police convened state and federal government officials, senior foreign officials, leading analysts, congressional staff, and other stakeholders to review the Obama Administration's new integrated cluster initiative, the role of research parks in promoting innovation and regional and national economic development, best practice in cluster development from the United States and major cluster initiatives around the world, and the role and interplay of state, federal, and private initiatives to support parks and cluster development. This report includes a summary of the symposium presentations and an overview section reviewing the issues discussed and placing them in a larger context. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Overviewp. 1
Proceedingsp. 21
Welcome and Introductionp. 23
Opening Keynote: The Illinois Innovation Opportunityp. 29
The Overall Innovation Challengep. 32
The Global Innovation Imperativep. 32
An Overview of Federal Cluster Policyp. 39
Illinois Science & Technology Coalitionp. 45
A Perspective from the IT Industryp. 51
Keynote: Innovation and the Clean Energy Challengesp. 57
Federal R&D Strategiesp. 66
The NSF Role in the Innovation Ecosystemp. 66
The Office of Naval Research: A Unique Innovation Organizationp. 70
Advancing Innovation and Convergence in Cancer Researchp. 73
Illinois Innovation Initiativesp. 82
Inspiring Innovationp. 83
Engaging the Public in Support of Science and Technologyp. 86
Driving Entrepreneurship in Illinoisp. 87
Disruptive Environments that Seed Discovery and Promote Translationp. 90
The Bench to Bedside Story of Oncofertilityp. 92
Welcome and Introductionp. 99
Keynote Addressp. 100
Innovation in Illinois: A Regional Case Studyp. 105
The Role of Illinois Universitiesp. 105
The Federal Laboratory Contributionp. 108
Early-Stage Finance and Support in Illinoisp. 112
Technology-Based Development in Illinoisp. 116
New Initiatives and Best Practices in Innovationp. 120
Tim Persons, Government Accountability Officep. 120
Innovative Approaches in Oncology: Physical Sciences Perspectivesp. 123
New Initiatives at the University of Illinoisp. 126
University Technology Transfer: Lessons from Lyrica™p. 129
Building an Institute for Engineering Innovation at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratoryp. 132
The Industry Perspective on Illinoisp. 136
Industry Perspective on Illinoisp. 138
Motorola Solutionsp. 140
Roundtable: Best Practices, Lessons, and Opportunitiesp. 144
Appendixes
Agendap. 151
Biographies of Speakersp. 156
Participants Listp. 181
Bibliographyp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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