Catalogue


The invisible code : honor and sentiment in postrevolutionary France, 1814-1848 /
William M. Reddy.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, 1997.
description
xv, 258 p. : ill.
ISBN
0520205367 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, 1997.
isbn
0520205367 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1011121
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The Invisible Code is a carefully researched and methodologically ambitious work. Professor Reddy gives us a great deal to think about through his vivid accounts of marital conflict, journalistic confrontations, and workplace humiliation in Balzac's Paris: He argues convincingly that the records of these "ordinary" dramas can give the attentive historian access to the feelings of those involved, and that those feelings are fodder for historical analysis. While demonstrating that the collapse of Old Regime corporate institutions made way for the rise of a powerful, but invisible, code of honor in public life, Reddy challenges us to integrate the power of subjective, individual emotion into our understanding of the nature and transformation of public cultures."--Sarah Maza, author of Private Lives and Public Affairs
Flap Copy
" The Invisible Codeis a carefully researched and methodologically ambitious work. Professor Reddy gives us a great deal to think about through his vivid accounts of marital conflict, journalistic confrontations, and workplace humiliation in Balzac's Paris: He argues convincingly that the records of these "ordinary" dramas can give the attentive historian access to the feelings of those involved, and that those feelings are fodder for historical analysis. While demonstrating that the collapse of Old Regime corporate institutions made way for the rise of a powerful, but invisible, code of honor in public life, Reddy challenges us to integrate the power of subjective, individual emotion into our understanding of the nature and transformation of public cultures."--Sarah Maza, author of Private Lives and Public Affairs
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-08:
Under the Bourbon Restoration (c. 1814-1830) and the "bourgeois monarchy" (1830-1848) France seems to have been absorbed by matters of governance, occasions of upheaval and revolution, and economic and social change. With the definitive eclipse of corporate institutions dating from the old regime, new ways of defining social categories and of conducting relationships inevitably emerged. In this very engaging and important study, Reddy, historian and cultural anthropologist, suggests that neither laws, nor politics, nor even class or economic achievement governed many aspects of human interactions. Elusive, unwritten, frequently decisive and devastating, a "code of honor" permeated nearly every activity; for the sake of one's honor, especially that of one's family, everything else was secondary. Fear of shame, for example, drove many a transaction. Reddy allows for the existence of several facets of models of human behavior, and explores, among other matters, effects of pedagogy, acceptance of duty, care for appearances, competition and self-interest, and marital situations. A chapter devoted to bureaucratic advancement at the Ministry of the Interior is marvelously illustrative of the power of the code of honor. Upper-division undergraduates and above. N. Greene; Wesleyan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 1997
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Summaries
Long Description
Starting from the premise that private feeling cannot be contained or eliminated from public deliberation or action, William M. Reddy embarks on a fascinating inquiry into the influence of honor on behavior in nineteenth-century France. He discovers that French society was governed by a strict code of honor and that males in particular were vulnerable to acute feelings of shame, while any other feelings--referred to as "sentiment"--were considered the special domain of women. Examining the realms of both marriage and the public sphere, Reddy uncovers the feelings of shame and self-esteem, fear and desire, that entered in an unperceived yet fundamental way into the sense of self that many elite men and women worked out in the course of their lives. Reddy draws from archival documents spanning the disparate realms of marriage, bureaucracy, education, the fledgling profession of journalism, and literature from 1814 to 1848. Inspired by the research of women's studies and the history of gender, he explores the relationship between gender and emotion, and reveals the threads that held the social order together and gave coherence to peoples' lives and identities.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
The Hidden Pedagogy of Honor: Cicero, Racine, Sevignep. 18
Sensitive Hearts: Marital Honor and Women's Identityp. 65
The Ladder Up: Accumulating Honors in the Ministry of the Interiorp. 114
Condottieri of the Pen: The Political Honor of Journalistsp. 184
Conclusion: Gender and Sentimentp. 228
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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