Catalogue


The movement and the sixties /
Terry H. Anderson.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1995.
description
500 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195074092
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1995.
isbn
0195074092
catalogue key
1011105
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1995-02-20:
Anderson defines the 1960s' ``movement'' as a loose, ever-shifting coalition of social activists including civil rights and Vietnam War protesters, feminists, students, ecologists and hippies. In his analysis, the movement was generally leaderless and was not defined by new-left philosophy; rather, its members were motivated by the old-fashioned American pragmatism that drove protesters during other reform eras‘the Revolution, Jacksonian democracy, the populist and progressive era and the New Deal. Far from being a failure, as critics contend, the movement, in Anderson's estimate, cracked a rigid Cold War culture, forced campus and educational reform, sped the passage of civil rights legislation, revolutionized the status of women and influenced mainstream politics, which co-opted many of its ideas about citizen and community empowerment. Professor of history at Texas A&M University, Anderson draws heavily on interviews, underground newspapers, leaflets and participants' memoirs to create a vivid newsreel. His sweeping study is a valuable, refreshingly unbiased reassessment of the '60s legacy. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 1995-03-15:
The Sixties, Texas A & M historian Anderson argues in this meticulously researched account, sought to answer what he considers the "central question" of U.S. history: "What is the meaning of America?" He follows the protests and demonstrations of the groups challenging or defending the status quo in the Sixties and describes how the politics of the period turned abruptly from hope and peaceful change to despair and violence. He also demonstrates how the Sixties counterculture, once intent on changing the political and social structure, fragmented in the Seventies into groups focused on themselves. Anderson generally emphasizes the positive contributions of "the movement"‘freedom to live alternative lifestyles and empowerment of ethnics, women, gays, youth, and senior citizens. But he glosses over the downside of the legacy: disintegration of the family unit, fragmentation of national politics, and increased drug use. David Farber's The Sixties: From Memory to History (Univ. of North Carolina Pr., 1994) has a broader scope, but Anderson's generally evenhanded study adds rich detail missing from the earlier work. [For an in-depth view of the Sixties from those who helped create the revolution, see Ron Chepesiuk's Sixties Radicals, Then and Now, reviewed on p. 85.‘Ed.]‘Jack Forman, Mesa Coll. Lib., San Diego (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, February 1995
Library Journal, March 1995
Booklist, April 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
It began in 1960 with the Greensboro sit-ins. By 1973, when a few Native Americans rebelled at Wounded Knee and the U.S. Army came home from Vietnam, it was over. In between came Freedom Rides, Port Huron, the Mississippi Summer, Berkeley, Selma, Vietnam, the Summer of Love, Black Power, the Chicago Convention, hippies, Brown Power, and Women's Liberation--The Movement--in an era that became known as The Sixties. Why did millions of Americans become activists; why did they take to the streets? These are questions Terry Anderson explores inThe Movement and The Sixties, a searching history of the social activism that defined a generation of young Americans and that called into question the very nature of "America." Drawing on interviews, "underground" manuscripts colleceted at campuses and archives throughout the nation, and many popular accounts, Anderson begins with Greensboro and reveals how one event built upon another and exploded into the kaleidoscope of activism by the early 1970s. Civil rights, student power, and the crusade against the Vietnam War composed the first wave of the movement, and during and after the rip tides of 1968, the movement changed and expanded, flowing into new currents of counterculture, minority empowerment, and women's liberation. The parades of protesters, along with schocking events--from the Kennedy assassination to My Lai--encouraged other citizens to question their nation. Was America racist, imperialist, sexist? Unlike other books on this tumultuous decade,The Movement and The Sixtiesis neither a personal memoir, nor a treatise on New Left ideology, nor a chronicle of the so-called leaders of the movement. Instead, it is a national history, a compelling and fascinating account of a defining era that remains a significant part of our lives today.
Authored Title
A history of social activism as it unfolded in the 1960s.
Long Description
It began in 1960 with the Greensboro sit-ins. By 1973, when a few Native Americans rebelled at Wounded Knee and the U.S. Army came home from Vietnam, it was over. In between came Freedom Rides, Port Huron, the Mississippi Summer, Berkeley, Selma, Vietnam, the Summer of Love, Black Power, the Chicago Convention, hippies, Brown Power, and Women's Liberation--The Movement--in an era that became known as The Sixties. Why did millions of Americans become activists; why did they take to the streets? These are questions Terry Anderson explores in The Movement and The Sixties, a searching history of the social activism that defined a generation of young Americans and that called into question the very nature of "America." Drawing on interviews, "underground" manuscripts colleceted at campuses and archives throughout the nation, and many popular accounts, Anderson begins with Greensboro and reveals how one event built upon another and exploded into the kaleidoscope of activism by the early 1970s. Civil rights, student power, and the crusade against the Vietnam War composed the first wave of the movement, and during and after the rip tides of 1968, the movement changed and expanded, flowing into new currents of counterculture, minority empowerment, and women's liberation. The parades of protesters, along with schocking events--from the Kennedy assassination to My Lai--encouraged other citizens to question their nation. Was America racist, imperialist, sexist? Unlike other books on this tumultuous decade, The Movement and The Sixties is neither a personal memoir, nor a treatise on New Left ideology, nor a chronicle of the so-called leaders of the movement. Instead, it is a national history, a compelling and fascinating account of a defining era that remains a significant part of our lives today.
Table of Contents
For Rosep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Preface: The movement and the Sixtiesp. xiii
Introduction The Spawning Ground: Cold War Culturep. 3
The First Wave: The Surge, 1960 to 1968p. 41
The Strugglep. 43
The Movement and the Sixties Generationp. 87
Days of Decisionp. 131
1968: Rip Tidesp. 183
The Second Wave: The Crest, 1968 to the Early 1970sp. 240
Counterculturep. 241
Power and Liberationp. 293
The Movement Toward a New Americap. 355
Legacies: The Sea Changep. 411
A Note on Sources and Notesp. 425
Indexp. 473
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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