Catalogue


Legacies of childhood : growing up Chinese in a time of crisis, 1890-1920 /
Jon L. Saari.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 1990.
description
xix, 379 p. : ill. --
ISBN
0674521609
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 1990.
isbn
0674521609
catalogue key
1003154
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1990-12:
Saari examines the influences shaping the young Chinese who grew up during the turbulent decades between 1890 and 1920. Raised in the traditional Chinese manner emphasizing filial respect, these young people found that their upbringing inadequately prepared them for the challenges posed by Japan and the West. Through interviews with elderly Taiwan residents socialized in this pattern and the writings of prominent young activists of the period, such as Ch'u Ch'iu-p'ai, Lu Hsun, Hu Shih, and Kuo Mo-Jo, Saari has reconstructed the dilemma and attempted to explain the Chinese response. One of his most poignant examples recounts the emotions Lu Hsun experienced after he defied his Chinese upbringing and challenged the authority of both his teacher and the school principal. Unfortunately, this study will probably not be embraced by the general public, but it deserves a place in the libraries of all serious students of China and the Chinese. Upper-division undergraduates and above. -R. H. Detrick, University of North Texas
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1990
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Jon L. Saari defines the generation of educated Chinese born around the turn of the century as "the last to have the world of Confucian learning etched into their memories as schoolboys, yet the first as a group to confront the intrusive Western world." The legacies of growing up in a changing environment deeply affected this generation's responses to the further changes in the world they confronted as adults. In the collapse of the Ch'ing dynasty and the chaos of the early twentieth century, traditional ideas of the self, the nature of relationships in society, and ethical behavior had to be reexamined and redefined. To reconstruct what those who lived through and shaped this extraordinary period felt, needed, thought, and became as children and adults, Saari draws on autobiographical writings and his own interviews among the elderly on Taiwan and Hong Kong. He interprets this material within its Chinese context but brings Western sociological, anthropological, and psychological insights to bear on it.
Unpaid Annotation
Jon L. Saari defines the generation of educated Chinese born around the turn of the century as 'the last to have the world of Confucian learning etched into their memories as schoolboys, yet the first as a group to confront the intrusive Western world.' The legacies of growing up in a changing environment deeply affected this generation's responses to the further changes in the world they confronted as adults. In the collapse of the Ch'ing dynasty and the chaos of the early twentieth century, traditional ideas of the self, the nature of relationships in society, and ethical behavior had to be reexamined and redefined.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem