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Transient apostle : Paul, travel, and the rhetoric of empire /
Timothy Luckritz Marquis.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2013.
description
xvi, 196 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0300187149 (alk. paper), 9780300187144 (alk. paper)
format
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2013.
isbn
0300187149 (alk. paper)
9780300187144 (alk. paper)
contents note
Traveling leaders of the ancient Mediterranean -- Travel, suicide, and self-construction -- Wandering, foreign God of Israel -- Delivering the spirit -- Whether home or away -- Ambassadors of God's empire.
catalogue key
8955224
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A lucid and illuminating discussion of Paul's prominent use of travel motifs and their role in the apostle's self-depiction and rhetorical strategy. Luckritz Marquis deftly situates Paul's itinerancy and his variegated travel rhetoric within the enhanced physical mobility of the Roman empire."- John T. Fitzgerald, University of Notre Dame
"A lucid and illuminating discussion of Paul's prominent use of travel motifs and their role in the apostle's self-depiction and rhetorical strategy. Luckritz Marquis deftly situates Paul's itinerancy and his variegated travel rhetoric within the enhanced physical mobility of the Roman empire."-- John T. Fitzgerald, University of Notre Dame
"This ambitious, well-researched and illuminating study makes a significant and original contribution to the study of Paul and of first-century socio-historical and rhetorical contexts pertinent to the exploration of the New Testament. Impressively fluent with ancient sources and secondary literature, Luckritz Marquis analyzes Paul's discursive strategies with remarkable linguistic and conceptual proficiency."--Brigitte Kahl, Union Theological Seminary
"This ambitious, well-researched and illuminating study makes a significant and original contribution to the study of Paul and of first-century socio-historical and rhetorical contexts pertinent to the exploration of the New Testament. Impressively fluent with ancient sources and secondary literature, Luckritz Marquis analyzes Paul's discursive strategies with remarkable linguistic and conceptual proficiency."-Brigitte Kahl, Union Theological Seminary
"This brilliant and beautifully written book masterfully shows how Paul's rhetoric about himself as a travelling apostle created the new social movement we call "Christianity." Through his repeated talk about surviving the dangers of ancient travel, Paul exemplified how power shines forth in weakness, even as Christ's cross points to the glorious resurrection. An illuminating must-read for all interested in Paul and empire."--Karen L. King, Harvard Divinity School
"This brilliant and beautifully written book masterfully shows how Paul's rhetoric about himself as a travelling apostle created the new social movement we call "Christianity." Through his repeated talk about surviving the dangers of ancient travel, Paul exemplified how power shines forth in weakness, even as Christ's cross points to the glorious resurrection. An illuminating must-read for all interested in Paul and empire."-Karen L. King, Harvard Divinity School
"This is the single most sophisticated book on Paul to be written within the paradigms of contemporary critical thought. By integrating its extensive, erudite, and compelling citations of the Greco-Roman world in which Paul was writing with post-colonial and post-Marxist thinking, it makes real progress in understanding Paul's letters."-Daniel Boyarin
"This is the single most sophisticated book on Paul to be written within the paradigms of contemporary critical thought. By integrating its extensive, erudite, and compelling citations of the Greco-Roman world in which Paul was writing with post-colonial and post-Marxist thinking, it makes real progress in understanding Paul's letters."--Daniel Boyarin, University of California, Berkeley
"This is the single most sophisticated book on Paul to be written within the paradigms of contemporary critical thought. By integrating its extensive, erudite, and compelling citations of the Greco-Roman world in which Paul was writing with post-colonial and post-Marxist thinking, it makes real progress in understanding Paul's letters."-Daniel Boyarin, University of California, Berkeley
"Timothy Luckritz Marquis makes a compelling intervention in Pauline studies, bringing to light the full rhetorical complexity of the apostle's self-presentation in 2 Corinthians as an itinerant, both cosmopolitan and marginalized. Erudite, layered, and theoretically sophisticated, The Transient Apostle is original in its approach and persuasive in its conclusions."--Benjamin H. Dunning, author of Aliens and Sojourners: Self as Other in Early Christianity .
"Timothy Luckritz Marquismakes a compelling intervention in Pauline studies, bringing to light the full rhetorical complexity of the apostle's self-presentation in 2 Corinthians as an itinerant, both cosmopolitan and marginalized. Erudite, layered, and theoretically sophisticated, The Transient Apostle is original in its approach and persuasive in its conclusions."-Benjamin H. Dunning, author of Aliens and Sojourners: Self as Other in Early Christianity .
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In a significant reevaluation of the place of St. Paul in the early history of Christianity, this book explores the theme of travel through the surviving correspondence of the Apostle. The author casts Paul's rhetorical strategies against the background of Roman imperial policy, the commerce facilitated by conquest & the knowledge of foreign customs & peoples it allowed.
Description for Bookstore
In a significant reevaluation of Paul's place in the early Christian story, Timothy Luckritz Marquis explores the theme of travel in the apostle's correspondence and shows how Paul was a product of the material forces of his day.
Main Description
In a significant reevaluation of Paul's place in the early Christian story, Timothy Luckritz Marquis explores the theme of travel in the apostle's correspondence. He casts Paul's rhetorical strategies against the background of Augustus's age, when Rome's wealth depended on conquests abroad, the international commerce they facilitated, and the incursion of foreign customs and peoples they brought about. In so doing, Luckritz Marquis provides an explanation for how Paul created, maintained, and expanded his local communities in the larger, international Jesus movement and shows how Paul was a product of the material forces of his day. "This is the single most sophisticated book on Paul to be written within the paradigms of contemporary critical thought. By integrating its extensive, erudite, and compelling citations of the Greco-Roman world in which Paul was writing with post-colonial and post-Marxist thinking, it makes real progress in understanding Paul's letters."--Daniel Boyarin
Main Description
In a significant reevaluation of Paul's place in the early Christian story, Timothy Luckritz Marquis explores the theme of travel in the apostle's correspondence. He casts Paul's rhetorical strategies against the background of Augustus's age, when Rome's wealth depended on conquests abroad, the international commerce they facilitated, and the incursion of foreign customs and peoples they brought about. In so doing, Luckritz Marquis provides an explanation for how Paul created, maintained, and expanded his local communities in the larger, international Jesus movement and shows how Paul was a product of the material forces of his day. "This is the single most sophisticated book on Paul to be written within the paradigms of contemporary critical thought. By integrating its extensive, erudite, and compelling citations of the Greco-Roman world in which Paul was writing with post-colonial and post-Marxist thinking, it makes real progress in understanding Paul's letters."-Daniel Boyarin
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Traveling Leaders of the Ancient Mediterraneanp. 22
Travel, Suicide, and Self-Constructionp. 47
The Wandering, Foreign God of Israelp. 70
Delivering the Spiritp. 87
Whether Home or Awayp. 112
Ambassadors of God's Empirep. 127
Conclusionp. 148
Notesp. 154
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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