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The making of the Middle Sea : a history of the Mediterranean from the beginning to the emergence of the classical world /
author
Cyprian Broodbank.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013.
description
672 p. : col. ill., maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN
9780199999781

Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013.
isbn
9780199999781
contents note
A barbarian history -- Provocative places -- The speciating sea (1.8 million to 50,000 years ago) -- A cold coming we had of it (50,000-10,000 BC) -- Brave new worlds (10,000-5,500 BC) -- How it might have been (5,500-3,500 BC) -- The devil and the deep blue sea (3,500-2,200 BC) -- Pomp and circumstance (2,200-1,300 BC) -- From sea to shining sea (1,300-800 BC) -- The end of the beginning (800-500 BC) -- De profundis.
local note
ROM copy: Autographed by the author.
catalogue key
8943102
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An outstanding book: the best contribution to Mediterranean history in the sixty-plus years since Braudel's 'The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II.' I suspect that this is immediately going to become the standard work and will transform the way we think about the prehistoric and ancient Mediterranean." Ian Morris, Jean and Rebecca Willard Professor of Classics and Professor of History, Stanford University, and author of Why the West Rules -- For Now "Cyprian Broodbank gives us a masterly synthesis of the complex narratives of the deeper Mediterranean past based on a dazzling array of information from many disciplines. This is the Middle Sea brought alive through its people and its natural history, a brilliant 'longue durée' that shows us just how much Greece, Rome and other later societies owed to earlier millennia. Beautifully written, up-to-date and elegantly argued, The Making of the Middle Sea is a superb exercise in multidisciplinary scholarship which amplifies and expands the classic histories of Fernand Braudel and others and will stand proudly beside them." Brian Fagan, Professor Emeritus of Archaeology, University of California Santa Barbara, and author of The Attacking Ocean and Beyond the Blue Horizon "'Only connect', urged E.M. Forster--he could have had Cyprian Broodbank's Mediterranean cultures specifically in mind, since connectivity is a key theme of this brilliant volume in which the Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology at UCL expertly tracks over the very long term the complex traits and processes conducive to the emergence of a Mediterranean civilization." Paul Cartledge, A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, University of Cambridge, and author of After Thermopylae: The Oath of Plataea and the End of the Graeco-Persian Wars "There has been no book remotely like this. No one before Cyprian Broodbank has set out to compose a comprehensive, systematic, up-to-date archaeological history of the entire Mediterranean basin to the dawn of the Classical world. The author pulls it off, creating a veritable 'tour de force.' The book has a compelling, driving narrative and is a masterpiece of synthesis and compression. Without question, it will be seen immediately to be a landmark publication and will have a transformative impact on its field." John F. Cherry, Joukowsky Family Professor in Archaeology, Brown University, and co-editor of the Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology "'Never say that prehistory is not history.' This magisterial survey takes the great Fernand Braudel's advice to heart. It is an absorbing work of genuine history, profoundly learned yet wholly accessible, written with wit and elegance, and tellingly illustrated." Peregrine Horden, Royal Holloway, University of London, and Nicholas Purcell, University of Oxford, authors of The Corrupting Sea: A Study of Mediterranean History
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Summaries
Main Description
The Mediterranean has been, for millennia, one of the global arenas of human endeavour. World-class interpretations exist of its Classical and subsequent history, but there has been remarkably little holistic exploration of how its societies, culture, and economies first came into being, despite the fact that almost all the fundamental developments originated well before 500 BC. This book is the first full, interpretive synthesis for a generation on the rise of the Mediterranean world from its beginning, before the emergence of our own species, up to the threshold of Classical times. Thanks to unrivalled depth and breadth of exploration, Mediterranean archaeology is one of the world's richest sources for the reconstruction of ancient societies. This book is the first to draw in equal measure on ideas and information from the European, western Asian, and African flanks, as well as the islands at the Mediterranean's heart, to achieve a truly innovative focus on the varied trajectories and interactions that created this maritime world. The Mediterranean combines unusual conditions in a strictly unique fashion that goes a long way towards explaining its precocious development: it is the world's largest inland sea, easily the largest of the five challenging, opportunity-rich "mediterraneoid" environments on the planet, and adjacent to the riverine cores of two of the earliest civilizations, in Mesopotamia and Egypt. There is no doubt how its societies proved exceptional. Beautifully illustrated and ranging across disciplines, subject matter, and chronology from early humans and the origins of farming to the rise of civilizations--Egyptian, Levantine, Hispanic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Phoenician, Etruscan, early Greek--the book is a masterpiece of archaeological and historical writing.
Main Description
The Mediterranean has been for millennia one of the global cockpits of human endeavor. World-class interpretations exist of its Classical and subsequent history, but there has been remarkably little holistic exploration of how its societies, culture and economies first came into being, despite the fact that almost all the fundamental developments originated well before 500 BC. This book is the first full, interpretive synthesis for a generation on the rise of the Mediterranean world from its beginning, before the emergence of our own species, up to the threshold of Classical times, by which time the "Middle Sea" was already in effect made. Thanks to unrivalled depth and breadth of exploration, Mediterranean archaeology is one of the world's richest sources for the reconstruction of ancient societies. This book is the first to draw in equal measure on ideas and information from the European, western Asian and African flanks, as well as the islands at the Mediterranean's heart, to achieve a truly innovative focus on the varied trajectories and interactions that created this maritime world. The Mediterranean combines unusual conditions in a strictly unique fashion that goes a long way towards explaining its precocious development: it is the world's largest inland sea, easily the largest of the five challenging, opportunity-rich "mediterraneoid" environments on the planet, and adjacent to the riverine cores of two of the earliest civilizations, in Mesopotamia and Egypt. No wonder its societies proved exceptional. Extensively illustrated and ranging across disciplines, subject matter and chronology from early humans and the origins of farming and metallurgy to the rise of civilizations--Egyptian, Levantine, Hispanic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Phoenician, Etruscan, early Greek--the book is a masterpiece of archaeological and historical writing.
Main Description
The Mediterranean has been for millennia one of the global cockpits of human endeavor. World-class interpretations exist of its Classical and subsequent history, but there has been remarkably little holistic exploration of how its societies, culture and economies first came into being, despite the fact that almost all the fundamental developments originated well before 500 BC. This book is the first full, interpretive synthesis for a generation on the rise of the Mediterranean world fromits beginning, before the emergence of our own species, up to the threshold of Classical times, by which time the "Middle Sea" was already in effect made. Thanks to unrivalled depth and breadth of exploration, Mediterranean archaeology is one of the world's richest sources for the reconstruction of ancient societies. This book is the first to draw in equal measure on ideas and information from the European, western Asian and African flanks, as well as the islands at the Mediterranean's heart, to achieve a truly innovative focus on the varied trajectories and interactions that created this maritime world. The Mediterranean combines unusual conditions in a strictly unique fashion that goes a long way towards explaining its precocious development: it is the world's largest inland sea, easily the largest of the five challenging, opportunity-rich "mediterraneoid" environments on the planet, and adjacent to the riverine cores of two of the earliest civilizations, in Mesopotamiaand Egypt. No wonder its societies proved exceptional. Extensively illustrated and ranging across disciplines, subject matter and chronology from early humans and the origins of farming and metallurgy to the rise of civilizations - Egyptian, Levantine, Hispanic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Phoenician, Etruscan, early Greek - the book is a masterpiece of archaeological and historical writing.
Main Description
The Mediterranean has been for millennia one of the global cockpits of human endeavor. World-class interpretations exist of its Classical and subsequent history, but there has been remarkably little holistic exploration of how its societies, culture and economies first came into being, despitethe fact that almost all the fundamental developments originated well before 500 BC. This book is the first full, interpretive synthesis for a generation on the rise of the Mediterranean world from its beginning, before the emergence of our own species, up to the threshold of Classical times, bywhich time the "Middle Sea" was already in effect made. Thanks to unrivalled depth and breadth of exploration, Mediterranean archaeology is one of the world's richest sources for the reconstruction of ancient societies. This book is the first to draw in equal measure on ideas and information from the European, western Asian and African flanks, as well asthe islands at the Mediterranean's heart, to achieve a truly innovative focus on the varied trajectories and interactions that created this maritime world. The Mediterranean combines unusual conditions in a strictly unique fashion that goes a long way towards explaining its precocious development: it is the world's largest inland sea, easily the largest of the five challenging, opportunity-rich "mediterraneoid" environments on the planet, and adjacentto the riverine cores of two of the earliest civilizations, in Mesopotamia and Egypt. No wonder its societies proved exceptional. Extensively illustrated and ranging across disciplines, subject matter and chronology from early humans and the origins of farming and metallurgy to the rise of civilizations - Egyptian, Levantine, Hispanic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Phoenician, Etruscan, early Greek - the book is a masterpiece ofarchaeological and historical writing.

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