Economix : how our economy works (and doesn't work) in words and pictures /
by Michael Goodwin ; illustrated by Dan E. Burr ; foreword by David Bach ; introduction by Joel Bakan ; lettering by Debra Freiberg.
imprint
New York : Abrams ComicArts, c2012.
description
304 p. : chiefly ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0810988399 (Paper), 9780810988392 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Abrams ComicArts, c2012.
isbn
0810988399 (Paper)
9780810988392 (Paper)
contents note
The invisible hand: the distant past to 1820 -- Full steam ahead: 1820-1865 -- The money power: 1865-1914 -- Things fall apart: 1914-1945 -- Guns and butter: 1945-1966 -- The era of limits: 1966-1980 -- The revolt of the rich: 1980-2001 -- The world today: 2001 onward.
abstract
"Stimulus plans: good or bad? Free markets: How free are they? Jobs: Can we afford them? Occupy Wall Street . . . worldwide! Everybody’s talking about the economy, but how can we, the people, understand what Wall Street or Washington knows—or say they know? Read Economix. With clear, witty writing and quirky, accessible art, this important and timely graphic novel transforms “the dismal science” of economics into a fun, fact-filled story about human nature and our attempts to make the most of what we’ve got . . . and sometimes what our neighbors have got. Economix explains it all, from the beginning of Western economic thought, to markets free and otherwise, to economic failures, successes, limitations, and future possibilities. It’s the essential, accessible guide to understanding the economy and economic practices."--Publisher's website.
catalogue key
8895689
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 295-296) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-08-20:
Economics is terrifying. Even if one doesn't consider the bleak state of the current world economy, just attempting to create a mental picture of the complex systems of market forces, government agencies, and human psychologies that drive the economy can be like trying to visualize a map of the universe. But Goodwin and illustrator Burr argue that the economy is easy enough to understand if you break it down into bite-sized chunks, roughly the dimensions of a comic panel. They tell the story of the economy starting with its first documented examination by Adam Smith and working their way up to 2011. That devotion to thoroughness makes this a dense yet quite accessible read. Goodwin brilliantly contextualize economic theories with historical narrative, while Burr's simple but elegant illustration employs classical techniques like caricaturing politicians and symbolizing big businesses (as a gleeful factory) to help the reader visualize difficult concepts. If the book has a prime message, it's that the economy is quite understandable and when things go wrong, the effort and thinking of a whole society must be applied to bring everything back into line. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Appeared in Library Journal on 2012-11-15:
This dense yet readable exegesis makes economics entertaining despite current financial shenanigans worldwide. Goodwin takes a chronological approach, starting with the history of banking in the 17th century. As he marches through four centuries of economic theories and theorists, he attempts to show what happened, what succeeded, and what went wrong in terms of both public and private good, with a focus on the reasons particular theories didn't pan out in real life. Confusing concepts are explained in text and in the glossary. Generally, Goodwin takes a liberal/progressive view, holding that laissez-faire approaches work best today when combined with other approaches in a "blended economy," and that a healthy economy benefits average citizens rather than predominantly favoring large corporate/financial entities. Others may not agree, but then they can create their own graphic economics texts. -VERDICT With quirky, engaging art that dramatizes the discussion well, Economix is a must have for all academic, public, and high school libraries and should be required reading for all of voting age. (Comprehensive references appear at economixcomix.com.) Note also Hill and Wang's quite good two-volume The Cartoon Introduction to Economics, organized by concept.-M.C. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, August 2012
Library Journal, November 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Stimulus plans: good or bad? Free markets: How free are they? Jobs: Can we afford them? Occupy Wall Street . . . worldwide! Everybody's talking about the economy, but how can we, the people, understand what Wall Street or Washington knowsor say they know? Read Economix. With clear, witty writing and quirky, accessible art, this important and timely graphic novel transforms "the dismal science" of economics into a fun, fact-filled story about human nature and our attempts to make the most of what we've got . . . and sometimes what our neighbors have got. Economixexplains it all, from the beginning of Western economic thought, to markets free and otherwise, to economic failures, successes, limitations, and future possibilities. It's the essential, accessible guide to understanding the economy and economic practices. A must-read for every citizen and every voter.
Main Description
Stimulus plans: good or bad? Free markets: How free are they? Jobs: Can we afford them? Occupy Wall Street . . . worldwide! Everybody's talking about the economy, but how can we, the people, understand what Wall Street or Washington knows-or say they know? Read Economix. With clear, witty writing and quirky, accessible art, this important and timely graphic novel transforms "the dismal science" of economics into a fun, fact-filled story about human nature and our attempts to make the most of what we've got . . . and sometimes what our neighbors have got. Economixexplains it all, from the beginning of Western economic thought, to markets free and otherwise, to economic failures, successes, limitations, and future possibilities. It's the essential, accessible guide to understanding the economy and economic practices. A must-read for every citizen and every voter. PRAISE FOR ECONOMIX "Having never taken economics in college, I find the world of high finance needlessly complicated and confusing. Thankfully Michael Goodwin saw the need for a basic primary on how the economy currently works and how we got here. A text like this would certainly help high school and college students gain their first taste of financial literacy and it comes recommended for the rest of us." -ComicMix.com "It's simply phenomenal. You could read ten books on the subject and not glean as much information." - David Bachfounder of FinishRich Media; author of nine New York Timesbestsellers, including Debt Free for Lifeand The Automatic Millionaire "Goodwin has done the seemingly impossible-he has made economics comprehensible andfunny." - Joel Bakan, author of The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power "An amazing lesson in true-world economics! Delightfully presented, powerful, insightful, and important information! What a fun way to fathom a deep and often dark subject!" - John Perkins, author of Hoodwinkedand the New York Timesbestseller Confessions of an Economic Hit Man "Smart, insightful, clear, and as close to the truth as economics can get. The bonus: Who would have guessed that economics could be fun, and-here''s the joy-really accessible? Goodwin roots us in history and fills us with common sense understanding. As he puts it early on, economics seems horribly complicated mostly because we''re looking at it all at once. Broken down into its component pieces, it''s relatively easy to understand. And a good understanding of economics is critical to maneuvering in the world today. If I were compiling a list of the 100 most important books you can read in a lifetime, this would be on it." - Stephen Petranek, editor-in-chief, Weider History magazines, former editor-in-chief of Discovermagazine "Through a potent mix of comics and punchy, concise, accessible prose, Goodwin takes us on a provocative, exhaustively researched, and exceedingly engaging trip through our history and present day, creating an alternately hilarious and scary picture of where we are today as an economy -and what it all means. More than that, Goodwin makes the arcane, understandable. If your mind either spins or slumbers at the thought of economics, read Goodwin''s Economixand all will become clear. - Nomi Prins, author of It Takes a Pillage: An Epic Tale of Power, Deceit, and Untold Trillions " Economixis a lively, cheerfully opinionated romp through the historical and intellectual foundations of our current economy and our current economic problems. Goodwin has a knack for distilling complex ideas and events in ways that invite the reader to follow the big picture without losing track of what actually happened. Any reader wondering how our economy got to where it is today will find this a refreshing overview." - Timothy W. Guinnane, Philip Golden Bartlett Professor of Economic History, Yale University
Bowker Data Service Summary
Everybody's talking about the economy, but how can you evaluate what they're saying? How can we, the people, understand what the banks or government knows (or says they know)? Author Michael Goodwin asked himself the same questions and came up with a good answer: explore the development of economic thought.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 4
Introductionp. 6
Prefacep. 8
The Invisible Hand (The Distant Past to 1820)p. 13
Full Steam Ahead (1820-1865)p. 43
The Money Power (1865-1914)p. 73
Things Fall Apart (1914-1945)p. 95
Guns and Butter (1945-1966)p. 131
The Era of Limits (1966-1980)p. 163
The Revolt of the Rich (1980-2001)p. 197
The World Today (2001 Onward)p. 251
Glossaryp. 292
Further Readingp. 295
Acknowledgmentsp. 297
About the Authorp. 298
About the Artistp. 298
Indexp. 299
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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