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From meteorite impact to constellation city : a historical geography of Greater Sudbury /
Oiva W. Saarinen.
imprint
Waterloo, Ontario : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013.
description
xiii, 389 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781554588374 (pbk.)
format
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Waterloo, Ontario : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013.
isbn
9781554588374 (pbk.)
catalogue key
8895212
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Issued also in electronic format.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Oiva Saarinen received an Honours B.A. (i960) and an M.A. (1969) from the University of Western Ontario and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of London in 1979. He retired from Laurentian University in 2003. He is the author of Between a Rock and a Hard Place: A Historical Geography of the Finns in the Sudbury Area (WLU Press, 1999).
Summaries
Main Description
This is a historical geography of the City of Greater Sudbury. The story that began billions of years ago encompasses dramatic physical and human events. Among them are volcanic eruptions, two meteorite impacts, the ebb and flow of continental glaciers, Aboriginal occupancy, exploration and mapping by Europeans, exploitation by fur traders and Canadian lumbermen and American entrepreneurs, the rise of global mining giants, unionism, pollution and re-greening, and the creation of a unique constellation city of 160,000. The title posits the book's two main themes, one physical in nature and the other human: the great meteorite impact of some 1.85 billion years ago and the development of Sudbury from its inception in 1883. Unlike other large centres in Canada that exhibit a metropolitan form of development with a core and surrounding suburbs, Sudbury developed in a pattern resembling a cluster of stars of differing sizes. Many of Sudbury's most characteristic attributes are undergoing transformation. Its rocky terrain and the negative impact from mining companies are giving way to attractive neighbourhoods and the planting of millions of trees. Greater Sudbury's blue-collar image as a union powerhouse in a one-industry town is also changing; recent advances in the fields of health, education, retailing, and the local and international mining supply and services sector have greatly diversified its employment base. This book shows how Sudbury evolved from a village to become the regional centre for north-eastern Ontario and a global model for economic diversification and environmental rehabilitation.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a historical geography of the city of Greater Sudbury. The story that began billions of years ago encompasses dramatic physical and human events. Among them are volcanic eruptions, two meteorite impacts, the ebb and flow of continental glaciers, Aboriginal occupancy, exploration and mapping by Europeans, exploitation by fur traders and Canadian lumbermen and American entrepreneurs, the rise of global mining giants, unionism, pollution and re-greening, and the creation of a unique constellation city of 160,000.
Main Description
From Meteorite Impact to Constellation City is a historical geography of the City of Greater Sudbury. The story that began billions of years ago encompasses dramatic physical and human events. Among them are volcanic eruptions, two meteorite impacts, the ebb and flow of continental glaciers, Aboriginal occupancy, exploration and mapping by Europeans, exploitation by fur traders and Canadian lumbermen and American entrepreneurs, the rise of global mining giants, unionism, pollution and re-greening, and the creation of a unique constellation city of 160,000. The title posits the book's two main themes, one physical in nature and the other human: the great meteorite impact of some 1.85 billion years ago and the development of Sudbury from its inception in 1883. Unlike other large centres in Canada that exhibit a metropolitan form of development with a core and surrounding suburbs, Sudbury developed in a pattern resembling a cluster of stars of differing sizes. Many of Sudbury's most characteristic attributes are undergoing transformation. Its rocky terrain and the negative impact from mining companies are giving way to attractive neighbourhoods and the planting of millions of trees. Greater Sudbury's blue-collar image as a union powerhouse in a one-industry town is also changing; recent advances in the fields of health, education, retailing, and the local and international mining supply and services sector have greatly diversified its employment base. This book shows how Sudbury evolved from a village to become the regional centre for northeastern Ontario and a global model for economic diversification and environmental rehabilitation.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
List of Biographiesp. ix
Preface and Acknowledgementsp. xi
The Unfolding of the Natural Landscapep. 1
The Aboriginal/Colonial Frontierp. 25
Drawing Lines on the Mapp. 38
Forging of a Local Monopoly: From Prospectors and Speculators to the International Nickel Company (1883-1902)p. 50
Sudbury (1883-1939)p. 62
Copper Cliff (1886-1939)p. 97
From Local to Global Monopoly: The Merging of Inco and Mond (1902-1928)p. 109
Beyond Sudbury and Copper Cliff: Railway Stations, Mining Camps, Smelter Sites, and Company Townsp. 120
Beyond Sudbury and Copper Cliff: Forestry, Agriculture, Indian Reserves, and the Burwash Industrial Farmp. 139
From Falconbridge Nickel and Inco to Xstrata Nickel and Vale Canada (1928-2012)p. 161
From Company Town Setting to Regional Constellation (1939-1973)p. 185
From Regional Constellation to Greater Sudbury (1973-2001+)p. 211
A Union Town?p. 235
Healing the Landscapep. 261
Beyond a Rock and a Hard Placep. 280
Appendixp. 296
Notesp. 300
Bibliographyp. 337
Indexp. 367
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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