Politics and the people in revolutionary Russia [electronic resource] : a provincial history /
Sarah Badcock.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
description
xvii, 260 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521876230 (alk. paper), 9780521876230 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
isbn
0521876230 (alk. paper)
9780521876230 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction -- The February revolution : whose story to believe? -- The Socialist Revolutionary Party and the place of party politics -- Choosing local leaders -- Talking to the people and shaping revolution -- Soldiers and their wives -- Water is yours, light is yours, the land is yours, the wood is yours -- Feeding Russia.
catalogue key
8370525
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 244-256) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-11-01:
Badcock (Univ. of Nottingham) joins a number of other younger scholars in examining the impact of the 1917 Russian Revolution on ordinary people outside the capital cities. She has chosen the neighboring Volga provinces of Nizhegorod and Kazan, and clearly has scoured the local press and archives. The results, however, are disappointing. Although she has found a certain amount of interesting, useful material, she has not succeeded in creating either a narrative or a portrait of a region in crisis. Her argument--that the Provisional Government and Soviet foundered on the "elite's" naive incomprehension of peasant realities and attitudes--is weakened by her own simplified understanding of the views, aims, and policies of the men who suddenly found themselves in power in 1917. The publisher's failure to edit Badcock's prose severely weakens the book. The repetitions, malapropisms, passive constructions, and apparent animus against the definite article make the book a difficult slog. Researchers will be grateful for Badcock's spadework in the local archives, and graduate students may well find useful material here. Other readers will find the work too opaque to be helpful. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students/faculty only. J. Zimmerman emerita, University of Pittsburgh
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Badcock's book is a welcome addition to the still relatively small number of studies that have focused on the Russian Revolution outside St. Petersburg and Moscow. It also effectively challenges students to rethink the interpretations based on the views of the political elites. It is essential reading for all specialists on the Revolution."
"Badcock's book is a welcome addition to the still relatively small number of studies that have focused on the Russian Revolution outside St. Petersburg and Moscow. It also effectively challenges students to rethink the interpretations based on the views of the political elites. It is essential reading for all specialists on the Revolution." The Historian, Richard D. King, Ursinus College
"Sarah Badcock's new and exciting book is a major contribution to the historiography of 1917...It will be read with great interest by historians of the Revolution and shcolars of modern Russia more broadly...a fine addition to graduate-level seminars in Russian history." --Robert H. Greene, University of Montana: Canadian Journal of History
'Taking part in a burgeoning trend on regional history, Sarah Badcock proposes a new history of the Revolution as experienced in the two Volga provinces of Nizhni Novgorod and Kazan. The failure of the eight months of Russia's experiment of democracy is studied in a well informed narrative based on local newspapers and archive materials.' Central Eurasian Reader
"This is a significant contribution..." -Brian Bonhomme, American Historical Review
"Sarah Badcock's study of the revolution offers a detailed and absorbing analysis of political power in the revolutionary setting of 1917." -Lutz Haefner, H-HistGeog
"This welcome contribution to the history of the 1917 Russian revolution..." -Diane P. Koenker, The Journal of Interdisciplinary History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
After the collapse of the Romanov dynasty in February 1917, Russia was subject to an eight month experiment in democracy. Sarah Badcock studies its failure through an exploration of the experiences and motivations of ordinary men and women, urban and rural, military and civilian. Using previously neglected documents from regional archives, this 2007 text offers a history of the revolution as experienced in the two Volga provinces of Nizhegorod and Kazan. Badcock exposes the confusions and contradictions between political elites and ordinary people and emphasises the role of the latter as political actors. By looking beyond Petersburg and Moscow, she shows how local concerns, conditions and interests were foremost in shaping how the revolution was received and understood. She also reveals the ways in which the small group of intellectuals who dominated the high political scene of 1917 had their political alternatives circumscribed by the desires and demands of ordinary people.
Description for Bookstore
After the collapse of the Romanov dynasty in February 1917, Russia was subject to an eight month experiment in democracy. In this 2007 study, Sarah Badcock studies its failure through an exploration of the experiences and motivations of ordinary people, men and women, urban and rural, military and civilian.
Description for Bookstore
After the collapse of the Romanov dynasty in February 1917, Russia was subject to an eight month experiment in democracy. Sarah Badcock studies its failure through an exploration of the experiences and motivations of ordinary people, men and women, urban and rural, military and civilian.
Table of Contents
List of figures and tablep. viii
Notes on the textp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. x
Mapsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
The February revolution: whose story to believe?p. 30
The Socialist Revolutionary Party and the place of party politicsp. 56
Choosing local leadersp. 87
Talking to the people and shaping revolutionp. 123
Soldiers and their wivesp. 145
'Water is yours, light is yours, the land is yours, the wood is yours'p. 181
Feeding Russiap. 211
Conclusionsp. 238
Bibliographyp. 244
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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