Finding a way to the heart : feminist writings on Aboriginal and women's history in Canada /
edited by Robin Jarvis Brownlie and Valerie J. Korinek.
imprint
Winnipeg : University of Manitoba Press, c2012.
description
viii, 269 p. : ill., map, ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780887557323 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
imprint
Winnipeg : University of Manitoba Press, c2012.
isbn
9780887557323 :
general note
"In offering this volume of essays in honour of Sylvia Van Kirk's scholarship..."--P. 4.
catalogue key
8289203
 
Includes bibliographical references.
Issued also in electronic formats.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robin Jarvis Brownlie is an associate professor in the Department of History at University of Manitoba and author of A Fatherly Eye: Indian Agents, Government Power, and Aboriginal Resistance in Ontario, 1918-1939. Valerie J. Korinek is a professor in the Department of History at University of Saskatchewan, and is the author of Roughing It in Suburbia: Reading Chatelaine Magazine in the Fifties and Sixties.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An essential piece of work and a must-have book for every scholar, historian, educator and student of Aboriginal culture and contributions."
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2012
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Summaries
Main Description
When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book, Many Tender Ties, in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in women#146;s, social, and Aboriginal history. Finding a Way to the Heart examines Van Kirk#146;s work, academic career, and her influence on a generation of feminist scholarship in fur trade and gender history, the history of Aboriginal women, the North American west, Native-newcomer relations, and multicultural history. Using Van Kirk#146;s themes and methodologies as a jumping-off point, the book also offers ten new essays examining race, gender, identity, and colonization over a time period extending from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century and a geographic area reaching from the western plains to southern Ontario to New Zealand.
Main Description
When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book, Many Tender Ties, in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in women?, social, and Aboriginal history. Finding a Way to the Heart examines Van Kirk? work, academic career, and her influence on a generation of feminist scholarship in fur trade and gender history, the history of Aboriginal women, the North American west, Native-newcomer relations, and multicultural history. Using Van Kirk? themes and methodologies as a jumping-off point, the book also offers ten new essays examining race, gender, identity, and colonization over a time period extending from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century and a geographic area reaching from the western plains to southern Ontario to New Zealand.
Main Description
When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book, Many Tender Ties, in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in women's, social, and Aboriginal history. Finding a Way to the Heart examines race, gender, identity, and colonization from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century, and illustrates Van Kirk's extensive influence on a generation of feminist scholarship.
Main Description
When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book, Many Tender Ties , in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in women's, social, and Aboriginal history. Finding a Way to the Heart examines Van Kirk's work, academic career, and her influence on a generation of feminist scholarship in fur trade and gender history, the history of Aboriginal women, the North American west, Native-newcomer relations, and multicultural history. Using Van Kirk's themes and methodologies as a jumping-off point, the book also offers ten new essays examining race, gender, identity, and colonization over a time period extending from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century and a geographic area reaching from the western plains to southern Ontario to New Zealand.
Main Description
When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book Many Tender Ties in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in women's, social, and Aboriginal history. Finding a Way to the Heart examines Van Kirk's work, her academic career, and her influence on a generation of feminist scholarship in fur trade and gender history, the history of Aboriginal women, the North American west, Nativenewcomer relations, and multicultural history. Using Van Kirk's themes and methodologies as a jumping-off point, the book also off ers ten new essays examining race, gender, identity, and colonization over a time period extending from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century and a geographic area reaching from the western plains to southern Ontario to New Zealand.
Main Description
When Sylvia Van Kirk published her groundbreaking book, Many Tender Ties, in 1980, she revolutionized the historical understanding of the North American fur trade and introduced entirely new areas of inquiry in womens, social, and Aboriginal history. Using Van Kirks themes and methodologies as a jumping-off point, Finding a Way to the Heart examines race, gender, identity, and colonization from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth century, and illustrates Van Kirks extensive influence on a generation of feminist scholarship.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introductionp. 3
Works by Sylvia Van Kirkp. 22
"All These Stories About Women": "Many Tender Ties" and a New Fur Trade Historyp. 25
Sylvia Van Kirk: A Feminist Appreciation of Front-line Work in the Academyp. 37
Daring to Write a History of Western Canadian Women's Experiences: Assessing Sylvia Van Kirk's Feminist Scholarshipp. 49
Ties Across the Borderp. 65
Historiography that Breaks Your Heart: Van Kirk and the Writing of Feminist Historyp. 81
Beyond the Borders: The "Founding Families" of Southern New Zealandp. 98
Multicultural Bands on the Northern Plains and the Notion of "Tribal" Historiesp. 122
"A World We Have Lost": The Plural Society of Fort Chipewyanp. 146
Others or Brothers?: Competing Settler and Anishinabe Discourses about Race in Upper Canadap. 170
Attitudes Toward "Miscegenation" in Canada, the United States, New Zealand, and Australia, 1860-1914p. 195
Home Tales: Gender, Domesticity, and Colonialism in the Prairie West, 1870-1900p. 222
"I am a proud Anishinaabekwe": Issues of Identity and Status in Northern Ontario after Bill C-31p. 241
Contributorsp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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