Constitution 3.0 : freedom and technological change /
Jeffrey Rosen, Benjamin Wittes, editors.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2011.
description
viii, 271 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0815722125 (Cloth), 9780815722120 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2011.
isbn
0815722125 (Cloth)
9780815722120 (Cloth)
contents note
Introduction: technological change and the constitutional future / Jeffrey Rosen -- Is the Fourth Amendment relevant in a technological age? / Christopher Slobogin -- Use restrictions and the future of surveillance law / Orin S. Kerr -- Cyberthreat, government network operations, and the Fourth Amendment / Jack Goldsmith -- The deciders : Facebook, Google, and the future of privacy and free speech / Jeffrey Rosen -- Is filtering censorship? : the second free speech tradition / Tim Wu -- A mutual aid treaty for the Internet / Jonathan Zittrain -- Neuroscience and the future of personhood and responsibility / Stephen J. Morse -- Cognitive neuroscience and the future of punishment / O. Carter Snead -- Reproductive rights and reproductive technology in 2030 / John A. Robertson -- The problems and possibilities of modern genetics : a paradigm for social, ethical, and political analysis / Eric Cohen and Robert P. George -- Endowed by their creator? : the future of constitutional personhood / James Boyle -- Innovation's darker future: biosecurity, technologies of mass empowerment, and the Constitution / Benjamin Wittes -- Epilogue : translating and transforming the future / Lawrence Lessig.
abstract
"Explores the challenges to constitutional values posed by sweeping technological changes such as social networks, brain scans, and genetic selection and suggests ways of preserving rights, including privacy, free speech, and dignity in the age of Facebook and Google"--
catalogue key
8270235
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this thought-provoking collection of essays by a distinguished group of scholars,Jeffrey Rosen and Ben Wittes take us on a magical journey to the Constitution's future,posing hard questions about how to translate our commitments to freedom and equalityto a technologically advanced world. This is a fascinating book that anyone interested inthe problems of technological change should read." -Jack M. Balkin, Knight Professor of ConstitutionalLaw and the First Amendment, Yale Law School
"In this terrific new anthology, someof the country's most original constitutional thinkers set themselves to imagining a bravenew world of 24 hour surveillance, Facebook snooping, neurological sentencing, biothreats,robots, and more. Each author tries to map these emerging technologies onto existingconstitutional doctrine and reflect on how the current doctrine must stretch to accommodate,or risk failing us. This is a thrilling, terrifying account of technology that has come todefine us, and a challenge to think in new ways about our most fundamental values." ┬┐DahliaLithwick, Slate senior editor
"In this terrific new anthology, some of the country's most original constitutionalthinkers set themselves to imagining a brave new world of 24 hour surveillance, Facebook snooping, neurological sentencing, biothreats, robots, and more. Each author tries to map these emerging technologies onto existing constitutional doctrine and reflect on how the current doctrine must stretch to accommodate, or risk failing us. This is a thrilling, terrifying account of technology that has come to define us, and a challenge to think in new ways about our most fundamental values." --Dahlia Lithwick, Slate senior editor
" Constitution 3.0 is a remarkable and provocative book that tackles one of law --andsociety's --most important questions: How will new technologies intersecting all aspectsof our lives affect our constitutional rights and our approach to a document written morethan two centuries ago? In this invaluable contribution, Jeffrey Rosen and BenjaminWittes, two of the nation's sharpest legal thinkers, ask some of the nation's preeminentscholars to look to the future and predict how cutting-edge technologies will coexist withone of the world's oldest constitutions." --Jan Crawford, CBS News Chief Legal and PoliticalCorrespondent, author, Supreme Conflict
""An invaluable roadmap for responding to the challenge of adapting our constitutional values to future technological developments."" -- POLITICO
This item was reviewed in:
Washington Post, June 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
"Explores the challenges to constitutional values posed by sweeping technological changes such as social networks, brain scans, and genetic selection and suggests ways of preserving rights, including privacy, free speech, and dignity in the age of Facebook and Google"--
Main Description
Constitution 3.0" presents an invaluable roadmap for responding to the challenge of adapting constitutional values to future technological developments. Individually and collectively, the deeply thoughtful analyses in "Constitution 3.0" present an innovative roadmap for adapting core legal values, in the interest of keeping the Constitution relevant through the 21st century. 275 pp. Pub. 10/11.
Main Description
Technological changes are posing stark challenges to America's core values. Basic constitutional principles find themselves under stress from stunning advances that were unimaginable even a few decades ago, much less during the Founders' era. Policymakers and scholars must begin thinking about how constitutional principles are being tested by technological change and how to ensure that those principles can be preserved without hindering technological progress. Constitution 3.0 , a product of the Brookings Institution's landmark Future of the Constitution program, presents an invaluable roadmap for responding to the challenge of adapting our constitutional values to future technological developments. Renowned legal analysts Jeffrey Rosen and Benjamin Wittes asked a diverse group of leading scholars to imagine plausible technological developments in or near the year 2025 that would stress current constitutional law and to propose possible solutions. Some tackled issues certain to arise in the very near future, while others addressed more speculative or hypothetical questions. Some favor judicial responses to the scenarios they pose; others prefer legislative or regulatory responses. Here is a sampling of the questions raised and answered in Constitution 3.0 : How do we ensure our security in the face of the biotechnology revolution and our overwhelming dependence on internationally networked computers? How do we protect free speech and privacy in a world in which Google and Facebook have more control than any government or judge? How will advances in brain scan technologies affect the constitutional right against self-incrimination? Are Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure obsolete in an age of ubiquitous video and unlimited data storage and processing? How vigorously should society and the law respect the autonomy of individuals to manipulate their genes and design their own babies? Individually and collectively, the deeply thoughtful analyses in Constitution 3.0 present an innovative roadmap for adapting our core legal values, in the interest of keeping the Constitution relevant through the 21st century. Contributors include Jamie Boyle, Erich Cohen, Robert George, Jack Goldsmith, Orin Kerr, Lawrence Lessig, Stephen Morse, John Robertson, Jeffrey Rosen, Christopher Slobogin, O. Carter Snead, Benjamin Wittes, Tim Wu, and Jonathan Zittrain.
Main Description
At the beginning of the twenty-first century, breathtaking changes in technology are posing stark challenges to our constitutional values. From free speech to privacy, from liberty and personal autonomy to the right against self-incrimination, basic constitutional principles are under stress from technological advances unimaginable even a fewdecades ago, let alone during the founding era. In this provocative collection, America's leading scholars of technology, law, and ethics imagine how to translate and preserve constitutional and legal values at a time of dizzying technological change. Constitution 3.0 explores some of the most urgent constitutional questions of the near future. Will privacy become obsolete, for example, in a world where ubiquitous surveillance is becoming the norm? Imagine that Facebook and Google post livefeeds from public and private surveillance cameras, allowing 24/7 tracking of any citizen in the world. How can we protect free speech now that Facebook and Google have more power than any king, president, or Supreme Court justice to decide who can speak and who can be heard? How will advanced brain-scan technology affect the constitutional rightagainst self-incrimination? And on a more elemental level, should people have the right to manipulate their genes and design their own babies? Should we be allowed to patent new forms of life that seem virtually human? The constitutional challenges posed by technological progress are wide-ranging, with potential impacts on nearly every aspect of life in America and around the world. The authors include Jamie Boyle, Duke Law School; Eric Cohen and Robert George, Princeton University; Jack Goldsmith, Harvard Law School; Orin Kerr, George Washington University Law School; Lawrence Lessig, Harvard Law School; Stephen Morse, University of Pennsylvania Law School; John Robertson, University of Texas Law School; Christopher Slobogin, Vanderbilt Law School; O. Carter Snead, Notre Dame Law School; JeffreyRosen, George Washington University Law School; Benjamin Wittes, Brookings Institution; Tim Wu, Columbia Law School; and Jonathan Zittrain, Harvard Law School.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Constitution 3.0', a product of the Brookings Institution's landmark Future of the Constitution program, presents an invaluable roadmap for responding to the challenge of adapting our constitutional values to future technological developments.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: Technological Change and the Constitutional Futurep. 1
The Future of Surveillance
Is the Fourth Amendment Relevant in a Technological Age?p. 11
Use Restrictions and the Future of Surveillance Lawp. 37
Cyberthreat, Government Network Operations, and the Fourth Amendmentp. 47
The Future of Free Expression and Privacy
The Deciders: Facebook, Google, and the Future of Privacy and Free Speechp. 69
Is Filtering Censorship? The Second Free Speech Traditionp. 83
A Mutual Aid Treaty for the Internetp. 100
The Future of Neurolaw
Neuroscience and the Future of Personhood and Responsibilityp. 113
Cognitive Neuroscience and the Future of Punishmentp. 130
Genetic Engineering and the Future of Constitutional Personhood
Reproductive Rights and Reproductive Technology in 2030p. 155
The Problems and Possibilities of Modern Genetics: A Paradigm for Social, Ethical, and Political Analysisp. 177
Endowed by Their Creator? The Future of Constitutional Personhoodp. 194
Innovation's Darker Future: Biosecurity, Technologies of Mass Empowerment, and the Constitutionp. 214
Epilogue: Translating and Transforming the Futurep. 243
Contributorsp. 255
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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