In the belly of a laughing god : humour and irony in Native women's poetry /
Jennifer Andrews.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
description
x, 324 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802035671 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780802035677 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2011.
isbn
0802035671 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780802035677 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7630701
 
Discography: p. [299].
Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-297) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'In the Belly of a Laughing Godsheds new light on an important and previously underdeveloped topic. I was very happy to see book-length criticism on these poets, and I hope this text inspires even more work.'
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Summaries
Main Description
In the Belly of a Laughing God examines how eight contemporary Native women poets in Canada and the United States employ humour and irony to address the intricacies of race, gender, and nationality.
Main Description
How can humour and irony in writing both create and destroy boundaries? In the Belly of a Laughing Godexamines how eight contemporary Native women poets in Canada and the United States - Joy Harjo, Louise Halfe, Kimberly Blaeser, Marilyn Dumont, Diane Glancy, Jeannette Armstrong, Wendy Rose, and Marie Annharte Baker - employ humour and irony to address the intricacies of race, gender, and nationality. While recognizing that humour and irony are often employed as methods of resistance, this careful analysis also acknowledges the ways that they can be used to assert or restore order. Using the framework of humour and irony, five themes emerge from the words of these poets: religious transformations; generic transformations; history, memory, and the nation; photography and representational visibility; and land and the significance of 'home.' Through the double-voice discourse of irony and the textual surprises of humour, these poets challenge hegemonic renderings of themselves and their cultures, even as they enforce their own cultural norms.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
Spiritual Transformationsp. 38
Generic Transformationsp. 79
Histories, Memories, and the Nationp. 123
Haunting Photographs, Revisioning Familiesp. 182
Space, Place, Land, and the Meaning(s) of Homep. 220
Conclusion: Intertextual Conversationsp. 269
Notesp. 273
Bibliographyp. 283
Discographyp. 299
Illustration Creditsp. 301
Indexp. 303
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