How to grow a school garden : a complete guide for parents and teachers /
Arden Bucklin-Sporer and Rachel Kathleen Pringle.
imprint
Portland, Or. : Timber Press, 2010.
description
223 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
ISBN
1604690003, 9781604690002
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Portland, Or. : Timber Press, 2010.
isbn
1604690003
9781604690002
contents note
Why school gardens? -- Laying the groundwork -- Getting the most from your site : design considerations -- Groundbreaking, budgeting, and fundraising -- Developing your school garden program -- A healthy outdoor classroom -- Tricks of the trade -- Planting, harvesting, and cooking in the garden -- Year-round garden lessons and activities -- A decade in a school garden : Alice Fong Yu Alternative School, San Francisco, California.
catalogue key
7347309
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 215-220) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-10-15:
With realistic plans designed to reap big rewards, this book provides comprehensive information on how to promote and establish a school garden as an outdoor classroom. Bucklin-Sporer and Pringle (executive director and program manager, respectively, San Francisco Green Schoolyard Alliance) address parents as integral partners who can help bring the project to fruition. They outline formative steps, from making the initial promotional pitch to procurement of adequate funding, organizational needs, and strategies to insure ongoing success. The book is packed with colorful photos and drawings, calendars, lesson plans, highlighted tips, recipes, and itemized lists of chores, tools, and plants. VERDICT The authors make a compelling case for "garden based learning" as a truly worthwhile investment because it generates a higher level of academic achievement among students who are happier and healthier from their exposure to gardening. This book will be a well-thumbed resource in many school and public libraries. Parents of school-age children, caregivers, and childhood educators will find it especially useful, and children are likely to be engaged by it as well. Strongly recommended.-Deborah Anne Broocker, Georgia Perimeter Coll. Lib., Dunwoody (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bucklin-Sporer and Pringle have written a book that simplifies and clarifies the mysterious process of changing part of any schoolyard from an asphalt wasteland to a lively connection with the natural world."
This book is a treasure trove of good advice and innovative ideas. From the usual 'what to grow' and 'how to garden' to using the garden as a teaching tool and creative starting point…Fabulous resource for schools but also families who want to get more out of their patch of land.
This book's hands-on approach will make school garden projects accessible, inexpensive, and sustainable.
"This book will be a well-thumbed resource in many school and public libraries. ... Strongly recommended."
This is my bible on starting a school garden. "
This terrific guide is filled with detailed, practical guidelines for organizing and running a school garden.
"As a former early childhood educator and one who gardened with her students, let me say that I wish this book would have existed when I was in the classroom. How to Grow a School Garden takes away the guesswork and provides tip after tip from two women who have many ears of school garden experience under their belts This book is a must-read for anyone (parent or teachers) interested in bringing gardens to their own school community."
SThis is my bible on starting a school garden. "
SThis terrific guide is filled with detailed, practical guidelines for organizing and running a school garden.
"The bounty of information is presented in ways that will generate excitement and provide inspiration. [An] excellent manual for teachers and parents."
Their hands-on approach makes school garden projects accessible, inexpensive and sustainable.
'œThis book is a treasure trove of good advice and innovative ideas. From the usual 'what to grow' and 'how to garden' to using the garden as a teaching tool and creative starting point'¦Fabulous resource for schools but also families who want to get more out of their patch of land.'
"As a former early childhood educator and one who gardened with her students, let me say that I wish this book would have existed when I was in the classroom. How to Grow a School Garden takes away the guesswork and provides tip after tip from two women who have many ears of school garden experience under their belts'¦ This book is a must-read for anyone (parent or teachers) interested in bringing gardens to their own school community."
"Easy-to-read, informative, and visually pleasing ” any parent or teacher considering a school garden will find a wealth of information in this book."
"Here's a book that we wish we could purchase many, many copies of, allowing its fun lessons to spread far and wide."
"[Introduces] the joys and benefits of digging in the dirt to kids who might not otherwise get the chance."
"Offer[s] the information and encouragement for helping schools create a patch of green."
STheir hands-on approach makes school garden projects accessible, inexpensive and sustainable.
SThis book is a treasure trove of good advice and innovative ideas. From the usual what to grow " and how to garden " to using the garden as a teaching tool and creative starting point Fabulous resource for schools but also families who want to get more out of their patch of land.
"As a former early childhood educator and one who gardened with her students, let me say that I wish this book would have existed when I was in the classroom. How to Grow a School Garden takes away the guesswork and provides tip after tip from two women who have many ears of school garden experience under their belts… This book is a must-read for anyone (parent or teachers) interested in bringing gardens to their own school community."
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, June 2010
Library Journal, October 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Both schools and parents have a responsibility to reinforce values of environmental stewardship, help students understand concepts of nutrition and health, and connect children to the natural world. This book illustrates how to achieve this by creating an outdoor classroom oasis.
Main Description
In this groundbreaking resource, two school garden pioneers offer parents, teachers, and school administrators everything they need to know to build school gardens and to develop the programs that support them.
Main Description
In this groundbreaking resource, two school garden pioneers offer parents, teachers, and school administrators everything they need to know to build school gardens and to develop the programs that support them. Today both schools and parents have a unique opportunity - and an increasing responsibility - to cultivate an awareness of our finite resources, to reinforce values of environmental stewardship, to help students understand concepts of nutrition and health, and to connect children to the natural world. What better way to do this than by engaging young people, their families, and teachers in the wondrous outdoor classroom that is their very own school garden? It is all here: developing the concept, planning, fundraising, organizing, designing the space, preparing the site, working with parents and schools, teaching in the garden, planting, harvesting, and even cooking, with kid-friendly recipes and year-round activities. Packed with strategies, to-do lists, sample letters, detailed lesson plans, and tricks of the trade from decades of experience developing school garden programs for grades K-8, this hands-on approach will make school garden projects accessible, inexpensive, and sustainable. Reclaiming a piece of neglected play yard and transforming it into an ecologically rich school garden is among the most beneficial activities that parents, teachers, and children can undertake together. The book provides all the tools that the school community needs to build a productive and engaging school garden that will continue to inspire and nurture their students and families for years to come.
Main Description
The more time children spend indoors, the less time they spend outdoors, often with dangerous results-obesity, attention disorders, and a disconnect from nature. Parents, teachers, and caretakers have a responsibility to connect childrento the natural world by teaching the values of environmental stewardship and the importance of nutrition and health.How to Grow a School Garden is a comprehensive guide to developing, planning, building, and maintaining a school garden. This hands-on approach includes all the information necessary to make school garden projects accessible, inexpensive, and sustainable. For parents, the authors offer detailed advice on how to secure support from the administration, how to raise money, how build a kid-friendly garden, how to manage volunteers, and how to ensure a smooth transition at the beginning of each school year. Teachers will gain valuable lesson plans and activities for a range of ages.Reclaiming a piece of neglected yard and transforming it into an ecologically rich garden is one of the most beneficial activities that parents, teachers, and children can undertake together. How to Grow a School Garden gives both teachers and parents everything they need to begin building a productive and engaging school arden.

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