The jobless future /
Stanley Aronowitz and William DiFazio.
imprint
Minneapolis, MN : University of Minnesota Press, c2010.
description
xxxv, 410 p.
ISBN
0816674515 (pbk.), 9780816674510 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Minneapolis, MN : University of Minnesota Press, c2010.
isbn
0816674515 (pbk.)
9780816674510 (pbk.)
contents note
Technoscience and joblessness -- The new knowledge work -- Technoculture and the future of work -- The end of skill? -- The computerized engineer and architect -- The professionalized scientist -- Contours of a new world -- Contradictions of the knowledge class : power, proletarianization, and intellectuals -- Unions and the future of professional work -- A taxonomy of teacher work -- Beyond the catastrophe -- The cultural construction of class : knowledge and the labor process -- Quantum measures: capital investment and job reduction -- The jobless future? -- Afterword : going beyond the current crisis.
abstract
" 'Jobs jobs jobs!' went the cry during the 1992 presidential election. If the slogan seems empty now, there is good reason, as the authors illustrate. The "jobless recovery" we're seeing today is no temporary hitch on the way to good times; it is, Stanley Aronowitz and William DiFazio contend, simply part of a profound shift in the world economy. The Jobless Future challenges beliefs in the utopian promise of a knowledge-based, high-technology economy. Reviewing a vast body of encouraging literature about the postindustrial age, Aronowitz and DiFazio conclude that neither theory, history, nor contemporary evidence warrants optimism about a technological economic order. Instead, they demonstrate the shift toward a massive displacement of employees at all levels and a large-scale degradation of the labor force. As they clearly chart a major change in the nature, scope, and amount of paid work, the authors suggest that notions of justice and the good life based on full employment must change radically as well. They close by proposing alternatives to our dying job culture that might help us sustain ourselves and our well-being in a science- and technology-based economic future. One alternative discussed is reducing the work day to fewer hours without reducing pay"--Publisher's website.
catalogue key
7322721
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Stanley Aronowitz is distinguished professor of sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of numerous books, including Paradigm Lost (Minnesota, 2002). William DiFazio is professor and chair of the sociology department at St. John's University, New York. He is the author of Ordinary Poverty.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1994-12:
Sociologists Aronowitz and DiFazio contend that scientific and technological advances have resulted in "too many workers for too few jobs, and even fewer of them are well paid." The authors proceed to pose questions regarding the effect this "progressive destruction of high-quality, well-paid, permanent jobs" will have on the meaning of work and its relationship to the concept of "self." Inexplicably, they salt this otherwise scholarly and well-researched work with detailed movie plot lines and wordy quotations from disgruntled workers. Replete with such futuristic concepts as cybernetics, technoculture, deskilling, and informatics, this book is as timely as today's headlines announcing the latest round of layoffs and downsizing. The hyperbolic title notwithstanding, this is an important and thought-provoking work that will be of primary interest to economists, sociologists, business leaders, and public policy-makers.-Alan Farber, Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Charting a major change in the nature of paid work in the United states, this volume was fist published in 1994, when it predicted that 'high technology will destroy more jobs than it creates'.
Main Description
High technology will destroy more jobs than it creates . This grim prediction was first published in the 1994 edition of The Jobless Future , an eerily accurate title that could have been written for today's dismal economic climate. Fully updated and with a new introduction by Stanley Aronowitz and William DiFazio, The Jobless Future warns that jobs as we know them-long-term, with benefits-are an endangered species.
Main Description
High technology will destroy more jobs than it creates. This grim prediction was first published in the 1994 edition ofThe Jobless Future, an eerily accurate title that could have been written for today's dismal economic climate. Fully updated and with a new introduction by Stanley Aronowitz and William DiFazio,The Jobless Futurewarns that jobs as we know them-long-term, with benefits-are an endangered species.
Table of Contents
Facing the Economic Crisis of the Twenty-first Century A New Introduction to The Jobless Futurep. xi
The Jobless Future
Prefacep. xxxiii
Introductionp. 1
Technoscience and Joblessness
The New Knowledge Workp. 13
Technoculture and the Future of Workp. 57
The End of Skill?p. 81
The Computerized Engineer and Architectp. 104
The Professionalized Scientistp. 139
Contours of a New World
Contradictions of the Knowledge Class: Power, Proletarianization, and Intellectualsp. 173
Unions and the Future of Professional Workp. 202
A Taxonomy of Teacher Workp. 226
Beyond the Catastrophe
The Cultural Construction of Class: Knowledge and the Labor Processp. 267
Quantum Measures: Capital Investment and Job Reductionp. 298
The Jobless Future?p. 328
Afterword: Going beyond the Current Crisisp. 359
Notesp. 377
Indexp. 395
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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