Placing memory and remembering place in Canada /
edited by James Opp and John C. Walsh.
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2010.
description
viii, 330 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
0774818409 (Cloth), 9780774818407 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2010.
isbn
0774818409 (Cloth)
9780774818407 (Cloth)
catalogue key
7265336
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
At the heart of debates surrounding commemoration are questions about what is remembered and what remains hidden or forgotten. This splendid volume examines how official memorials commemorating site-specific events often reveal diversity and even controversy surrounding local, vernacular experiences in Canada. The essays offer rich contributions to our understanding of memory and forgetting.– Julie Cruikshank, Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and author of Do Glaciers Listen?: Local Knowledge, Colonial Encounters, and Social Imagination
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Places are imagined, made, claimed, fought for and defended, and always in a state of becoming. This important book explores the historical and theoretical relationships among place, community, and public memory across differing chronologies and geographies within twentieth-century Canada. It is a collaborative work that shifts the focus from nation and empire to local places sitting at the intersection of public memory making and identity formation -- main streets, city squares and village museums, internment camps, industrial wastelands, and the landscape itself.With a focus on the materiality of image, text, and artefact, the essays gathered here argue that every act of memory making is simultaneously an act of forgetting; every place memorialized is accompanied by places forgotten.
Long Description
Placing Memory and Remembering Place in Canada maps afascinating terrain in memory studies by shifting the focus from nationand empire to local places that sit at the intersection of memorymaking and identity formation - main streets, city squares,village museums, internment camps, industrial wastelands, and the rurallandscape. While offering a unique perspective on the politics of place andmemory across differing chronologies and geographies, the first part ofthe book, "Commemorations," traces how local expressions ofmemory such as celebrations, museums, statues, postcards, and plaqueshave contributed to a sense of place and belonging in twentieth-centuryCanada. The second part, "Inscriptions," in turn exploreshow ordinary Canadians have embedded their memories of place in oralstories, photographs, and the landscape itself. With its focus on themateriality of image, text, and artefact, these essays argue for anunderstanding of place as imagined, made, claimed, fought for, anddefended - always in a state of becoming.
Main Description
Places are imagined, made, claimed, fought for and defended, and always in a state of becoming. This important book explores the historical and theoretical relationships among place, community, and public memory across differing chronologies and geographies within twentieth-century Canada. It is a collaborative work that shifts the focus from nation and empire to local places sitting at the intersection of public memory making and identity formation -- main streets, city squares and village museums, internment camps, industrial wastelands, and the landscape itself. With a focus on the materiality of image, text, and artefact, the essays gathered here argue that every act of memory making is simultaneously an act of forgetting; every place memorialized is accompanied by places forgotten.
Description for Teachers/Educators
This book will be of interest to students and scholars in Canadianhistory, geography, communication studies, and cultural studies and topolicy makers and general readers who want a deeper understanding ofthe politics of place and memory.

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