Procreative ethics : philosophical and Christian approaches to questions at the beginning of life /
Fritz Oehlschlaeger.
imprint
Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, c2010.
description
373 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1606082302 (pbk.), 9781606082300 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, c2010.
isbn
1606082302 (pbk.)
9781606082300 (pbk.)
contents note
Can the use of artificial contraception within marriage be consistent with the natural law? -- Abortion, the sacred, and sacrifice : or, what's at stake when life has dominion -- In defense of the "conception criterion" -- Abortion as letting die, bad Samaritanism, or just war : why we should reject the analogies -- Why David Boonin's defense of Thomson fails to persuade the abortion critic -- The ethics of genetic enhancement : a test of pragmatism as democratic tradition -- Why designing the subjects of justice is likely to be unjust -- Giving our children bread : why the harm conundrum is not such a conundrum -- Why genetic therapy may need something "very much like the church" -- On Peter Singer's silencing in Germany : or, what's wrong with asking "What's wrong with killing?" -- Repugnance, Frankenstein, and generational injustice : a consideration of reproductive cloning.
catalogue key
7057935
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-364) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Fritz Oehlschlaeger is Professor of English at Virginia Polytechnic institute and State University. He is co-author of Articulating the Elephant Man: Joseph Merrick and His Interpreters (1992) and Love and Good Reasons: Post liberal Approaches to Christian Ethics and Literature (2003).
Summaries
Main Description
Procreative Ethics addresses questions at the beginning of life from a point of view that is alternatively philosophical and Christian. The author seeks to defend philosophically some positions taken partly on Christian grounds while also trying to make the implications of Christian convictions intelligible to those who do not necessarily share those convictions. The author positions himself neither as a moral friend nor moral stranger, preferring instead the role of moral acquaintance to his audience. From that position, The goal is to find areas of fruitful agreement while clarifying differences that may lead to truer reconciliations further on in the conversation. The book opens with an attempted natural law defense of artificial contraception; devotes four chapters to criticism of current defenses of abortion; and then takes up, In six remaining chapters, such matters as genetic enhancement of children, The justice or injustice of genetic revision, The harm conundrum or non-identity problem, designing for disability, and reproductive cloning.
Main Description
Procreative Ethics addresses questions at the beginning of life from a point of view that is alternatively philosophical and Christian. The author seeks to defend philosophically some positions taken partly on Christian grounds while also trying to make the implications of Christian convictions intelligible to those who do not necessarily share those convictions. The author positions himself neither as a "moral friend" nor "moral stranger," preferring instead the role of "moral acquaintance" to his audience. From that position, the goal is to find areas of fruitful agreement while clarifying differences that may lead to truer reconciliations further on in the conversation. The book, opens with an attempted natural law defense of artificial contraception; devotes four chapters to criticism of current defenses of abortion; and then takes up, in six remaining chapters, such matters as genetic enhancement of children, the justice or injustice of genetic revision, the harm conundrum or non-identity problem, designing for disability, and reproductive cloning. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Can the Use of Artificial Contraception within Marriage Be Consistent with the Natural Law?p. 19
Abortion, the Sacred, and Sacrifice: Or, What's at Stake When Life has Dominionp. 47
In Defense of the "Conception Criterion"p. 72
Abortion as Letting Die, Bad Samaritanism, or Just War: Why We Should Reject the Analogiesp. 104
Why David Boonin's Defense of Thomson Fails to Persuade the Abortion Criticp. 145
The Ethics of Genetic Enhancement: A Test of Pragmatism as Democratic Traditionp. 170
Why Designing the Subjects of Justice Is Likely to be Unjustp. 196
Giving Our Children Bread: Why the Harm Conundrum is Not such a Conundrump. 232
Why Genetic Therapy May Need Something "Very Much Like the Church"p. 268
On Peter Singers Silencing in Germany: Or, What's Wrong with Asking "What's Wrong with Killing?"p. 299
Repugnance, Frankenstein, and Generational Injustice: A Consideration of Reproductive Cloningp. 319
Bibliographyp. 349
Indexp. 365
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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