Dictionary of concepts in history /
Harry Ritter.
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1986.
description
xix, 490 p. ; 25 cm. --
ISBN
0313227004 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Greenwood Press, 1986.
isbn
0313227004 (lib. bdg. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
688863
 
Includes bibliographies and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1987-01:
Behind this book lies the assumption that, in spite of protestations to the contrary, historians have created their own specialized vocabulary or unique ways of defining familiar words. As a result, Ritter's dictionary will serve as a quick means to the definition and background of more than 80 concepts commonly used or misused by historians. Each entry includes a brief definition of the concept, a historical essay on its development with appropriate cross-references to related entries, an annotated list of the works cited in the essay, and suggestions for further reading. A generous index of persons and subjects allows for more comprehensive linking of material in the individual entries than can be accomplished by simply using the cross-references. Ritter's choice of historical concepts includes basic terms, such as ``crisis,'' ``event,'' and ``fact''; various isms such as ``historicism,'' ``idealism,'' and ``positivism''; and types of history-comparative, intellectual, social, or universal. Although the concepts often possess multiple and conflicting definitions, Ritter's entries skillfully guide the reader to an overall historical and philosophical understanding of the various usages. The selection of concepts is generally thorough although the thorny ideas of Michel Foucault are omitted completely-a pity given Ritter's ability to summarize difficult topics lucidly. Undergraduate and graduate collections.-R. Fritze, Lamar University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œRitter ... has performed a noble service for his colleagues and their students. Surely undergraduates and high school students become confused about the meanings of key concepts in history, basic ideas such as cultural history, dialectic, the Enlightenment, historical materialism, liberalism, realism, and Zeitgeist. Ritter takes approximately a hundred of these terms and, whenever possible, explains how, when, and by whom they were introduced and how they have been used over the years and how their meanings have evolved. ... When interested in a concise, quick source of these terms, such readers will find this ... helpful. ...'' Wilson Library Bulletin
"Ritter ... has performed a noble service for his colleagues and their students. Surely undergraduates and high school students become confused about the meanings of key concepts in history, basic ideas such as cultural history, dialectic, the Enlightenment, historical materialism, liberalism, realism, and Zeitgeist. Ritter takes approximately a hundred of these terms and, whenever possible, explains how, when, and by whom they were introduced and how they have been used over the years and how their meanings have evolved. ... When interested in a concise, quick source of these terms, such readers will find this ... helpful. ..."- Wilson Library Bulletin
"Behind this book lies the assumption that, in spite of protestations to the contrary, historians have created their own specialized vocabulary or unique ways of defining familiar words. As a result, Ritter's dictionary will serve as a quick means to the definition and background of more than 80 concepts commonly used or misused by historians. Each entry includes a brief definition of the concept, a historical essay of its development with appropriate cross-references to related entries, an annotated list of the works cited in the essay, and suggestions for further reading. A generous index of persons and subjects allows for more comprehensive linking of material in the individual entries that can be accomplished by simply using the cross-references. Ritter's choice of historical concepts includes basic terms, such as 'crisis,' 'event,' and 'fact'; various isms such as 'historicism,' 'idealism,' and 'positivism'; and types of history--comparative, intellectual, social or universal. Although the concepts often possess multiple and conflicting definitions, Ritter's entries skillfully guide the reader to an overall historical and philosophical understanding of the various usages. The selection of concepts is generally thorough.... Undergraduate and graduate collections."- Choice
'œBehind this book lies the assumption that, in spite of protestations to the contrary, historians have created their own specialized vocabulary or unique ways of defining familiar words. As a result, Ritter's dictionary will serve as a quick means to the definition and background of more than 80 concepts commonly used or misused by historians. Each entry includes a brief definition of the concept, a historical essay of its development with appropriate cross-references to related entries, an annotated list of the works cited in the essay, and suggestions for further reading. A generous index of persons and subjects allows for more comprehensive linking of material in the individual entries that can be accomplished by simply using the cross-references. Ritter's choice of historical concepts includes basic terms, such as 'crisis,' 'event,' and 'fact'; various isms such as 'historicism,' 'idealism,' and 'positivism'; and types of history--comparative, intellectual, social or universal. Although the concepts often possess multiple and conflicting definitions, Ritter's entries skillfully guide the reader to an overall historical and philosophical understanding of the various usages. The selection of concepts is generally thorough.... Undergraduate and graduate collections.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1987
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