Bacterial signal transduction : networks and drug targets /
edited by Ryutaro Utsumi.
imprint
New York : Springer Science+Business Media ; Austin, Tex. : Landes Bioscience, c2008.
description
xvii, 242 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0387788840, 9780387788845
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Springer Science+Business Media ; Austin, Tex. : Landes Bioscience, c2008.
isbn
0387788840
9780387788845
catalogue key
6486351
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Aus den Rezensionen:"... Dieses Buch … gibt einen vertiefenden Einblick in die Komplexität ausgewählter Histidinkinase/ Antwortregulator-Systeme ... Das Buch ist eine Zusammenstellung aktueller Übersichtsartikel zu einzelnen Systemen und liefert somit Wissenschaftlern, die an diesen Themen forschen, eine Fülle von Daten ..." (Kirsten Jung, in: BIOspektrum, 2009, Vol. 15, Issue 5, S. 581)
Aus den Rezensionen: "... Dieses Buch ... gibt einen vertiefenden Einblick in die Komplexitt ausgewhlter Histidinkinase/ Antwortregulator-Systeme ... Das Buch ist eine Zusammenstellung aktueller bersichtsartikel zu einzelnen Systemen und liefert somit Wissenschaftlern, die an diesen Themen forschen, eine Flle von Daten ..." (Kirsten Jung, in: BIOspektrum, 2009, Vol. 15, Issue 5, S. 581)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Recently, a vast amount of exciting new information on the signal transduction pathway in bacteria has been brought to light. Reports on these developments have been put together in this book, with the aim of providing an incentive for researchers to further elucidate the TCS networks and apply them in the search for drugs.
Main Description
This fascinating book encourages many microbiologists and students to enter the new world of signal transduction in microbiology. Over the past decade, a vast amount of exciting new information on the signal transduction pathway in bacteria has been brought to light. Reports on these developments have been put together in this book, Bacterial Signal Transduction: Networks and Drug Targets. The aim of this book is to provide an incentive for graduate students, academic scientists, and researchers in the pharmaceutical industry to further elucidate the TCS networks and apply them in the search for novel drugs.
Table of Contents
Introduction to Bacterial Signal Transduction Networksp. 1
Abstractp. 1
Introductionp. 1
Mg2+ Stimulonp. 1
EvgS/EvgA TCSp. 2
Signal Transduction Cascade between EvgS/EvgA and PhoQ/PhoP TCSsp. 5
Future Perspectivesp. 5
The Phoq/Phop Regulatory Network of Salmonella Entericap. 7
Abstractp. 7
Introductionp. 7
The Salmonella phoP Gene: from Phosphatase Regulator to Virulence Controllerp. 8
Structural and Functional Properties of the PhoP and PhoQ Proteinsp. 8
Defining the PhoP Regulonp. 9
Direct Transcriptional Control by the PhoP Proteinp. 9
The How and Why of PhoQ/PhoP Positive Autoregulationp. 11
Indirect and Nontraditional Transcriptional Control by the PhoP Proteinp. 12
Typical and Atypical Transcriptional Cascadesp. 12
A Feedforward Loop Regulating Expression of Horizontally-Acquired Genesp. 14
PhoP as a Co-Activator Proteinp. 14
Connector Proteins that Regulate Response Regulatorsp. 16
The Biological Consequences of Different Network Designsp. 17
Conclusionsp. 18
Structural Basis of The Signal Transduction in The Two-Component Systemp. 22
Abstractp. 22
Introductionp. 22
Structures of Each Domain in Two-Component Systemp. 24
Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinasep. 28
Oxygen Sensor FixL/FixJ Systemp. 32
Conclusionsp. 36
The Two-Component Network and the General Stress Sigma Factor Rpos (¿s) in Escherichia Colip. 40
Abstractp. 40
Introductionp. 40
Regulation of RpoSp. 41
The Response Regulator RssB Acts as a Targeting Factor in RpoS Proteolysisp. 42
The Role of RssB in the Regulation of RpoS Proteolysis by Environmental Signalsp. 44
The ArcB/ArcA/RssB "Three-Component" System Coordinates RpoS Expression and Proteolysis with Energy Metabolismp. 45
Role of the RpoS/RssB Feedback Cyclep. 47
Role of the IraP Protein as an Antagonist of RssBp. 47
Effects of RssB on Other Two-Component Systemsp. 47
Role of the BarA/UvrY Phosphorelay System in RpoS Transcriptionp. 48
Role of the Rcs Phosphorelay System in RpoS Translationp. 48
RpoS-Regulated Two-Component Systemsp. 49
Conclusions and Perspectivesp. 49
Small RNAS Controlled by Two-Component Systemsp. 54
Abstractp. 54
Introductionp. 54
Antisense Control of Translation Initiation and mRNA Stabilityp. 55
Sequestration of RNA-Binding Proteinsp. 59
Combination of Antisense and Sequestration Mechanismsp. 70
Concluding Remarksp. 71
Two-Component Signaling and Gram Negative Envelope Stress Response Systemsp. 80
Introductionp. 80
The ¿E Envelope Stress Responsep. 81
The Cpx Two-Component Systemp. 87
The Bae Two-Component Systemp. 94
The Phage-Shock-Protein (Psp) Responsep. 95
The Rcs Phosphorelay Systemp. 99
Dual Regulation with SER/THR Kinase Cascade and a HIS/ASPTCS in Myxococcus Xanthusp. 111
Abstractp. 111
Introductionp. 111
FruA: A Key Developmental Transcription Factorp. 113
MrpC: A Transcriptional Activator for fruA Expressionp. 113
Genetic Study of the mrpC Locusp. 113
MrpC Binding Sites in mrpC and fruA Promoter Regionsp. 115
Regulation of mrpC Expression Mediated by MrpA, MrpB and MrpCp. 115
Pkn8-Pkn14 Kinase Cascadep. 116
mrpC Expression in pkn8 and pkn14-Deletion Strains during Vegetative Growthp. 117
MrpC2, a Major Regulator for mrpC and fruA Expressionp. 117
Inhibition by Pkn8-Pkn14 Kinase Cascade on MrpC/MrpC2 Expression during Vegetative Growthp. 118
Overviewp. 118
Two-Component Signaling Systems and Cell Cycle Control in Caulobacter Crescentusp. 122
Abstractp. 122
Introductionp. 122
Caulobacter crescentus: A Dimorphic Bacterial Model for Cell Cycle Regulationp. 123
CtrA, GcrA and DnaA: Global Regulators of Cell Cycle Progressionp. 123
Transcriptional Control of CtrAp. 125
Proteolytic Control of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteinsp. 126
Phosphorylative Control of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteinsp. 127
Upstream Cell Cycle Control by Opposing Kinasesp. 127
Network Control of Histidine Kinase Localization and Polar Morphogenesisp. 128
The Search for Regulatory Signalsp. 128
REGB/REGA, A Global Redox-Responding Two-Component Systemp. 131
Abstractp. 131
Introductionp. 131
Members of the Reg Regulonp. 136
The Sensor Kinase RegBp. 140
The Response Regulator RegAp. 143
DNA-Binding Sitesp. 144
Concluding Remarksp. 145
The BVGS/BVGA Phosphorelay System of Pathogenic Bordetellae: Structure, Function and Evolutionp. 149
Abstractp. 149
Introductionp. 149
Phenotypic Phases in the Expression of the Virulence Factors of B. pertussisp. 150
Structure Function Relationships in the BvgS/BvgA Phosphorelay Systemp. 153
BvgA-DNA Interactionsp. 153
Fine Tuning of the Activity of the BvgS/BvgA Phosphorelayp. 155
Relevance of BvgS/BvgA Mediated Gene Regulation during the Infection Processp. 156
Evolutionary Considerationsp. 156
Capturing The VIRA/VIRG TCS of Agrobacterium Tumefaciensp. 161
Abstractp. 161
Introductionp. 161
Signal Perception and Transmissionp. 165
Antibiotic Developmentp. 172
Perspectivep. 173
Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus Mutansp. 178
Abstractp. 178
Introductionp. 178
Virulence Properties of S. mutansp. 179
Quorum Sensing System in S. mutansp. 180
Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Formation in S. mutansp. 182
Density-Dependent Production of Bacteriocins: Implications on Survival in Plaquep. 184
Quorum Sensing-Dependent Growth Arrest and Cell Deathp. 184
Effect of Other Signal Transduction Systems on S. mutans Biofilm Formationp. 184
Future Perspectivesp. 186
The Roles of Two-Component Systems in Virulence of Pathogenic Escherichia Coli and Shigella SPPp. 189
Abstractp. 189
Introductionp. 189
Genome Structure of Pathogenic E. coli and Shigella spp.p. 190
Two-Component Systems (TCSs) in Virulence Expressionp. 191
Conclusionp. 197
Vancomycin Resistance VANS/VANR Two-Component Systemsp. 200
Abstractp. 200
Introductionp. 200
A Range of Different VanS/VanR Systemsp. 202
What Do the van Genes Encode?p. 203
VanS/VanR Biochemistryp. 204
VanS/VanR and Acetyl Phosphatep. 205
'Crosstalk' with Other Two-Component Systemsp. 205
Relationships Between VanS Proteins of Different Originp. 206
What Is the Effector Ligand Recognised by VanS?p. 208
Functional Differences between Vancomycin and Teicoplaninp. 209
Evolution of the van Clusterp. 210
Tearing Down the Wall: Peptidoglycan Metabolism and the WALK/WALR (YycG/YycF) Essential Two-Component Systemp. 214
Abstractp. 214
Introductionp. 214
walRK Operon Structurep. 215
The WalK Histidine Kinasep. 216
The WalR Response Regulatorp. 218
A Matter of Life and Death: To Be or Not to Be Essentialp. 218
Global Analyses of WalKR-Regulated Genes Reveal a Major Role in Cell Wall Homeostasisp. 220
walRK Operon Expressionp. 222
DNA Sequence Targeted by the WalR Regulatorp. 223
Phenotypes Associated with a Defect in WalKR Activityp. 223
Impact of the WalKR System on Virulencep. 224
The WalKR TCS as a Target for Antimicrobial Therapy: A Bacterial Achille's Heel?p. 225
Inhibitors Targeting Two-Component Signal Transductionp. 229
Abstractp. 229
Introductionp. 229
HK Inhibitorsp. 230
Inhibitors Targeting an Essential TCS, YycG/YycFp. 232
Structure-Based Virtual Screeningp. 234
Indexp. 237
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