The art of natural history : illustrated treatises and botanical paintings, 1400-1850 /
edited by Therese O'Malley and Amy R. W. Meyers.
imprint
Washington : National Gallery of Art ; New Haven : Distributed by Yale University Press, c2008.
description
279 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
ISBN
030012158X (cloth), 9780300121582 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington : National Gallery of Art ; New Haven : Distributed by Yale University Press, c2008.
isbn
030012158X (cloth)
9780300121582 (cloth)
general note
"Proceedings of the symposium 'The Art and History of Botanical Painting and Natural History Treatises,' organized by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts and sponsored by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation in honor of Franklin D. Murphy. The symposium was held 3-4 May 2002 in Washington."
catalogue key
6404211
 
Includes bibiographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-10-01:
Humanity's fascination with the flora and fauna of the natural world is of long duration and has led to frequent attempts to visually portray what has been encountered and experienced. This handsome volume, with its numerous black-and-white illustrations and colored plates, examines in 11 essays the importance of images in conveying information, impressions, aesthetic judgments, and scientific knowledge of the natural world from the 15th to the mid-19th century in illustrated treatises and botanical paintings. The focus of this volume, which was developed from presentations made for a symposium titled The Art and History of Botanical Painting and Natural History Treatises, held at the National Gallery of Art in 2002, is on works prepared in Italy, Spain, Germany, England, and Holland. Of particular interest is the careful analysis of the importance of visualization and visual thinking in the creation of these images, which adds to the description and understanding of the objects and of the assumptions/perceptions of the creator of these images. Although many works illustrate the development of natural history and natural history illustration, no other volume is so provocative in examining the role of natural history illustration in presenting new knowledge. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above; general readers. P. D. Thomas Wichita State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2008
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Summaries
Long Description
"Making knowledge visible" is how one 16th-century naturalist described the work of the illustrator of botanical treatises. His words reflected the growing role played by illustrators at a time when the study of nature had been assuming new authority in the world of learning. An absorbing exploration of the relationship between image and text, this collection considers how both aided the development and transmission of scientific knowledge. Presenting images found throughout Europe in works on natural history, medicine, botany, horticulture, and garden design, and studies of insects, birds, and animals, the contributors emphasize their artistic as well as scientific values. Illustrators are shown to have been both artists and either naturalists or gardeners, bringing to their work aesthetic judgment and empirical observation. Their fascinating images receive a fresh, wide-ranging analysis that covers such topics as innovation, patronage, readership, reception, technologies of production, and the relationship between the fine arts and scientific depictions of nature.
Main Description
Now available in paperback "Making knowledge visible" is how one 16th-century naturalist described the work of the illustrator of botanical treatises. His words reflected the growing role played by illustrators at a time when the study of nature had been assuming new authority in the world of learning. An absorbing exploration of the relationship between image and text, this collection considers how both aided the development and transmission of scientific knowledge. Presenting images found throughout Europe in works on natural history, medicine, botany, horticulture, and garden design, and studies of insects, birds, and animals, the contributors emphasize their artistic as well as scientific values. Illustrators are shown to have been both artists and either naturalists or gardeners, bringing to their work aesthetic judgment and empirical observation. Their fascinating images receive a fresh, wide-ranging analysis that covers such topics as innovation, patronage, readership, reception, technologies of production, and the relationship between the fine arts and scientific depictions of nature.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 7
Introductionp. 9
Artisanal Knowledge and the Representation of Nature in Sixteenth-Century Germanyp. 15
Botany and Humanism in the Renaissance: Background, Interaction, Contradictionsp. 33
The Uses of Botanical Treatises in the Netherlands, c. 1600p. 63
Between Observation and Image: Representations of Insects in Robert Hooke's Micrographiap. 83
The Eyes of the New Pliny: The Use of Images in Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo's Historia general y natural de las Indiasp. 109
Mexican Nature in Diego Valades' Rhetorica christiana (1579)p. 127
From Florence to Philadelphia: Naturalistic Illustration in Tuscany, c. 1760-c. 1840p. 143
"La femminil pazienza": Women Painters and Natural History in the Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuriesp. 159
A Garden Book Made for Emperor Rudolf II in 1593: Hans Puechfeldner's Nutzliches Khunstbuech der Gartnereijp. 187
"Cosmic Delight": Bartolomeo Bimbi and the Representation of Nature at the Court of Cosimo III de' Medicip. 205
The Congenial Climate of Coffeehouse Horticulture: The Historia plantarum rariorum and the Catalogus plantarump. 227
The Club at the Temple Coffee House
Contributorsp. 261
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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