Introductory biomechanics : from cells to organisms /
C. Ross Ethier and Craig A. Simmons.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
description
xiii, 511 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0521841127 (hardback), 9780521841122 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2007.
isbn
0521841127 (hardback)
9780521841122 (hardback)
catalogue key
6192260
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-11-01:
Ethier and Simmons (both, Univ. of Toronto) tackle the interdisciplinary field of biomechanics by making it approachable for both engineers and biologists. The book is primarily geared toward undergraduate engineers across disciplines, but because it assumes very little previous knowledge of biology or engineering, it also benefits biologists interested in integrating a quantitative approach into their science. Each chapter opens with an introduction to the biology of a physiological system, and then dissects the system into its fundamental biomechanical elements and equations; in-depth description of the techniques and tools used to analyze the system follows. The authors help to motivate the engineering by directly connecting it to human health and disease, and they are successful in integrating their analysis across length scales. The book stands out for its exceptional use of illustrations and its excellent use of references, guiding an interested reader to the landmark papers in biomechanics research. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. C. A. Reinhart-King Cornell University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Ethier and Simmons have crafted a masterful book ... Based on a long-standing course taught to non-bioengineers, the presentation of material is clear and straightforward. Illustrations are of excellent quality and rich in content. This text will inspire many students of traditional engineering areas to think of biomechanics as a fertile discipline worthy of further pursuit.' James E. Moore, Jr, Texas A&M University
'Ethier and Simmons have crafted a masterful book ... Based on a long-standing course taught to non-bioengineers, the presentation of material is clear and straightforward. Illustrations are of excellent quality and rich in content. This text will inspire many students of traditional engineering areas to think of biomechanics as a fertile discipline worthy of further pursuit.'Professor James E. Moore Jr., Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University
Ethier and Simmons have crafted a masterful book clearly capable of introducing engineering students of multiple disciplines to the fascinating field of biomechanics. This text should find wide application in providing sufficient background for a fundamental understanding of this important, emerging area. The depth of coverage will serve well as a foundation for further investigation at the upper undergraduate or graduate level. Yet, little prior knowledge of biology is assumed. The topics covered include clinical specialties in which biomechanics has lent to the understanding and improvement of human health, including the cardiovascular, optometry, and musculoskeletal areas. Based on a long-standing course taught to non-bioengineers, the presentation of material is clear and straightforward. Illustrations are of excellent quality and rich in content. This text will inspire many students of traditional engineering areas to think of biomechanics as a fertile discipline worthy of further pursuit. - James E. Moore, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University
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Choice, November 2007
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This text introduces students to a wide selection of topics in biomechanics, ranging from the mechanics of single cells to the dynamics of human movement. The text adopts an integrated approach and is supported by a wealth of illustrations and problems, making it an essential textbook for any biomechanics course.
Long Description
Introductory Biomechanics is a new, integrated text written specifically for engineering students. It provides a broad overview of this important branch of the rapidly growing field of bioengineering. A wide selection of topics is presented, ranging from the mechanics of single cells to the dynamics of human movement. No prior biological knowledge is assumed and in each chapter, the relevant anatomy and physiology are first described. The biological system is then analyzed from a mechanical viewpoint by reducing it to its essential elements, using the laws of mechanics and then tying mechanical insights back to biological function. This integrated approach provides students with a deeper understanding of both the mechanics and the biology than from qualitative study alone. The text is supported by a wealth of illustrations, tables and examples, a large selection of suitable problems and hundreds of current references, making it an essential textbook for any biomechanics course. C. Ross Ethier is a professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the Canada Research Chair in Computational Mechanics, and the Director of the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointment to the Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Sciences. His research focuses on biomechanical factors in glaucoma and blood flow and mass transfer in the large arteries. He has taught biomechanics for over ten years. Craig A. Simmons is the Canada Research Chair in Mechanobiology and an assistant professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointments to the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering andthe Faculty of Dentistry. His research interests include cell and tissue biomechanics and cell mechanobiology, particularly as it relates to tissue engineering and heart valve disease.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Cellular biomechanics
Hemodynamics
The circulatory system
The interstitium
Ocular biomechanics
The respiratory system
Muscles and movement
Skeletal biomechanics
Terrestrial locomotion
The electrocardiogram
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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