Scientific pioneers : women succeeding in science /
Joyce Tang.
imprint
Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, c2006.
description
xiii, 175 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0761833501 (pbk. : alk. ppr.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, c2006.
isbn
0761833501 (pbk. : alk. ppr.)
catalogue key
5882691
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 153-163) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-10-01:
The subtitle of this book aptly describes its focus--the women who have succeeded in science and how and why. Tang (sociology, Queens College, CUNY) begins with an examination of ten women who have unquestionably been pioneers or leading contributors to science: Marie Curie, Irene Joliot-Curie, Margaret Mead, Barbara McClintock, Maria Goeppert-Mayer, Rachel Carson, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Dorothy Hodgkin, Rosalyn Yalow, and Fay Ajzenberg-Selove. After a brief biographical history of each of these women, their lives and careers become the subject of a sociological analysis that highlights how the norms of the scientific community, specifically its emphasis on merit and the importance of gatekeepers (almost exclusively male) have been barriers to women's recognition. In part by their own hard work and intense dedication to their field, and in part by knowing how to work within the system or modify it, these women succeeded. The author concludes with a chapter on what the future holds for women in science, granting that many of the institutional obstacles that discriminated against women have now been removed, although cultural and ideological forces that discriminate still remain. A scholarly book with an impressive bibliography, ample documentation, and a detailed index. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through graduate students. M. H. Chaplin Wellesley College
Reviews
Review Quotes
....their lives and careers become the subject of a sociological analysis that highlights how the norms of the scientific community, specifically its emphasis on merit and the importance of gatekeepers (almost exclusively male) have been barriers to women's recognition....The author concludes with a chapter on what the future holds for women in science, granting that many of the institutional obstacles that discriminated against women have now been removed, although cultural and ideological forces that discriminate still remain. A scholarly book with an impressive bibliography, ample documentation, and a detailed index.Summing Up: HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Lower-division undergraduates through graduate students.
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, June 2006
Choice, October 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This book critically examines the career development of female scientific pioneers. Drawing from existing biographical and ethnographical data, author Joyce Tang analyzes the life and career histories of ten extraordinary female scientists-Marie Curie, Irene Joliot-Curie, Margaret Mead, Barbara McClintock, Maria Goeppert-Meyer, Rachel Carson, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Dorothy Hodgkin, Rosalyn Yalow, and Fay Ajzenberg-Selove. The author explores the personal, political, cultural, and economic factors that led to the success of these women. Scientific Pioneers proposes that for a woman to be successful in science not only requires perseverance and talent, but also structural opportunities, institutional support, and conscious decision making.
Long Description
This book critically examines the career development of female scientific pioneers. Drawing from existing biographical and ethnographical data, author Joyce Tang analyzes the life and career histories of ten extraordinary female scientists ”Marie Curie, Irene Joliot-Curie, Margaret Mead, Barbara McClintock, Maria Goeppert-Meyer, Rachel Carson, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Dorothy Hodgkin, Rosalyn Yalow, and Fay Ajzenberg-Selove. The author explores the personal, political, cultural, and economic factors that led to the success of these women. Scientific Pioneers proposes that for a woman to be successful in science not only requires perseverance and talent, but also structural opportunities, institutional support, and conscious decision making. Scientific Pioneers is an important addition to the growing literature about women in science, the sociology of science, and the dynamics of discrimination. This analysis of female scientific pioneers is an invaluable resource for both public policy debates and research on inequality.
Table of Contents
Scientific pioneersp. 1
Why aren't there more female scientific pioneers?p. 21
Origins : individual attributesp. 40
Development : structural opportunitiesp. 67
Reaching the top : institutional forcesp. 84
The contradictions of normsp. 101
What lies beneath?p. 130
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem