Bacterial cell-to-cell communication : role in virulence and pathogenesis /
edited by Donald R. Demuth and Richard J. Lamont.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
description
xv, 313 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521846382 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
isbn
0521846382 (hbk.)
standard identifier
9780521846387
catalogue key
5847268
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This is an interesting book covering intercellular chemical signalling in diverse bacteria ... The likely target audience for this book would be senior undergraduates and researchers for whom it would give a good contemporary introduction to signalling in different bacteria.' George Salmond, University of Cambridge
'This is an interesting book covering intercellular chemical signalling in diverse bacteria '¦ The likely target audience for this book would be senior undergraduates and researchers for whom it would give a good contemporary introduction to signalling in different bacteria.' George Salmond, University of Cambridge
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text examines the mechanisms of quorum sensing and cell-to-cell communication in bacteria and the roles that these processes play in regulating virulence, bacterial interactions with host tissues, and microbial development.
Description for Bookstore
Written by leading experts, this book summarises recent advances in the field of bacterial communication to allow students and researchers to keep abreast of the latest developments. The book describes how bacteria communicate and the relevance of these communication pathways to the disease process.
Main Description
Many bacterial diseases are caused by organisms growing together as communities or biofilms. These microorganisms have the capacity to coordinately regulate specific sets of genes by sensing and communicating amongst themselves utilizing a variety of signals. This book examines the mechanisms of quorum sensing and cell-to-cell communication in bacteria and the roles that these processes play in regulating virulence, bacterial interactions with host tissues, and microbial development. Recent studies suggest that microbial cell-to-cell communication plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a variety of disease processes.
Description for Library
Many bacterial diseases are caused by organisms growing together as communities called biofilms. These microorganisms have the capacity to sense and communicate amongst themselves through a variety of signals. This book examines the mechanisms of quorum sensing and cell-to-cell communication in bacteria and the roles that these processes play in regulating virulence, bacterial interactions with host tissues and microbial development. Written by leading experts, this book summarises recent advances in the field to allow students and researchers to keep abreast of the latest developments.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Quorum sensing and regulation of P. aeruginosa infections
The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal
Quorum sensing mediated regulation of plant/bacteria interactions and A. tumafaciens virulence
Jamming bacterial communications: new strategies to combat bacterial infections and the development of biofilms
Quorum sensing-mediated regulation of biofilm growth and virulence of Vibrio
LuxS in cellular metabolism and cell-cell signaling
LuxS dependent regulation of E. coli virulence
Quorum sensing and cell-to-cell communication in the dental biofilm
Quorum sensing-dependent regulation of staphylococcal virulence and biofilm development
Cell density dependent regulation of streptococcal competence
Signaling by a cell surface-associated signal during fruiting body morphogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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