How Groundhog's garden grew /
by Lynne Cherry.
imprint
New York : Blue Sky Press, 2003.
description
[36] p. : col. ill.
ISBN
0439323711 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Blue Sky Press, 2003.
isbn
0439323711 (alk. paper)
abstract
Squirrel teaches Little Groundhog how to plant and tend a vegetable garden.
catalogue key
5135526
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Grand Canyon Reader Award, USA, 2005 : Nominated
Virginia Reader's Choice Awards, USA, 2006 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2002-12-16:
Fact and fiction make fruitful partners in Cherry's (The Great Kapok Tree) cheerful account of a young groundhog's successful efforts to plant a vegetable garden. After Squirrel scolds Little Groundhog for feasting on the bounty of others' gardens, the fellow apologizes and admits he doesn't know how to plant his own. Squirrel willingly becomes his mentor, sharing her ample horticultural knowledge as she offers a chatty guide to planning, planting, tending, transplanting and harvesting a garden. Cherry's detailed, impressively precise renderings of the garden's offerings (traced from seeds, through seedlings to final product) and of the woodland animals who lend a gardening hand should easily snare the attention of aspiring green-thumbers; marginalia appear as detailed as scientific notebook sketches, artfully arranged in borders around the main action. The author interjects environmental messages, as when Wren and Praying Mantis strike a deal with Little Groundhog: "If you promise not to harm us with bug spray, we birds and insects will help you with your garden. We will eat the harmful insects that hurt your plants." Youngsters may well find this fledgling gardener's exuberance infectious ("It's beautiful! Scrumptious! Irresistible!" he exclaims as he prepares to share his homegrown food with his friends). If not tempted to grab a hoe, readers are at least likely to view the vegetables on their dinner plates with greater appreciation. Ages 4-up. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
An entertaining, creative story that''s loaded with information. When hungry Little Groundhog tries to eat some vegetables out of Squirrel''s garden, kind Squirrel takes him under his proverbial wing and shows him how to plant his own veggies to share with the entire animal community. Cherry intertwines the facts and vocabulary of gardening into a believable plot that will keep children reading, and her illustrations are well planned to combine with the text in an unusual way. Expansive spreads showing the animals tending their plots alternate with smaller, framed art. These smaller pictures are surrounded by clearly labeled pictures of various plants at different stages and other related objects. The detailed art continues on the endpapers, where readers can trace the growing cycle of many vegetables. This charming story teaches children about the interplay among all living things, and the good feeling that comes with community participation and sharing.--School Library Journal, February 2003 Little Groundhog loves eating from the neighbor''s vegetable garden--maybe too much. Perhaps it''s time he planted his own garden and, fortunately, Squirrel is willing to show him how. The two animals collect seeds, store them, and after winter hibernation and spring thaw, plant and tend them. By summer, Little Groundhog is joyfully harvesting and eating what they sowed. And such a plentiful harvest calls for sharing, bringing a wonderful Thanksgiving feast for all to enjoy. In simple, descriptive language, Cherry, author of The Great Kapok Tree (1990), tells a charming and also informative story about plants, gardening, and environmental respect. Her beautiful, full-color illustrations--realistic and wonderfully detailed--often incorporate spot-art borders of labeled seedlings and plants, highlighting a diverse array of wildlife. In an author''s note, Cherry describes her own gardening experiences and suggests a few resources for information. Little Groundhog is an endearing character whose awe in the miracle of growth is irresistible; by the close of the story, he has learned the rewards and joy of gardening, as well as the pleasures of friendship and giving. --Booklist, February 1, 2003 Fact and fiction make fruitful partners in Cherry''s (The Great Kapok Tree) cheerful account of a young groundhog''s successful efforts to plant a vegetable garden. After Squirrel scolds Little Groundhog for feasting on the bounty of others'' gardens, the fellow apologizes and admits he doesn''t know how to plant his own. Squirrel willingly becomes his mentor, sharing her ample horticultural knowledge as she offers a chatty guide to planning, planting, tending, transplanting and harvesting a garden. Cherry''s detailed, impressively precise renderings of the garden''s offerings (traced from seeds, through seedlings to final product) and of the woodland animals who lend a gardening hand should easily snare the attention of aspiring green-thumbers; marginalia appear as detailed as scientific notebook sketches, artfully arranged in borders around the main action. The author interjects environmental messages, as when Wren and Praying Mantis strike a deal with Little Groundhog: "If you promise not to harm us with bug spray, we birds and insects will help you with your garden. We will eat the harmful insects that hurt your plants." Youngsters may well find this fledgling gardener''s exuberance infectious ("It''s beautiful! Scrumptious! Irresistible!" he exclaims as he prepares to share his homegrown food with his friends). If not tempted to grab a hoe, readers are at least likely to view the vegetables on their dinner plates with greater appreciation.--Publishers Weekly, December 16, 2002 Good intentions crash and burn when the ill winds of pedantry overwhelm this story of a garden''s year. Here is Little Groundhog doing what groundhogs were born to do: seek and destroy gardens. Along comes Squirrel, loo
This item was reviewed in:
Horn Book Magazine,
Kirkus Reviews, December 2002
Publishers Weekly, December 2002
Booklist, February 2003
School Library Journal, February 2003
Horn Book Guide, October 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Beautiful illustrations and thorough research on plants and insects make this sweet story an engrossing read, as well as a great picture book introduction to how plants grow. Full color.
Main Description
"When hungry Little Groundhog tries to eat some vegetables out of Squirrel's garden, kind Squirrel takes him under his proverbial wing and shows him how to plant his own veggies...This charming story teaches children about the interplay among all living things, and the good feeling that comes with community participation and sharing." - School Library Journal
Main Description
"When hungry Little Groundhog tries to eat some vegetables out of SquirrelÂ’s garden, kind Squirrel takes him under his proverbial wing and shows him how to plant his own veggies...This charming story teaches children about the interplay among all living things, and the good feeling that comes with community participation and sharing." - School Library Journal
Library of Congress Summary
Squirrel teaches Little Groundhog how to plant and tend a vegetable garden.
Main Description
Little Groundhog learns how to plant and tend to his own food garden through every season in this beautifully-illustrated, thoroughly researched picture book by naturalist Lynne Cherry. Little Groundhog, in trouble for stealing from his friends' gardens, is taught by Squirrel to grow his very own. From seed-gathering to planting, harvesting, and eating home-grown fruits and vegetables, children join Little Groundhog in learning about the gardening process. At the end, Little Groundhog invites his animal friends to a Thanksgiving harvest feast. Beautiful illustrations and thorough research on plants and insects make this sweet story an engrossing read, as well as a great picture-book introduction to how plants grow. Children and schools can follow Groundhog's lessons.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Share your feedback