Writing in our time : Canada's radical poetries in English (1957-2003) /
Pauline Butling and Susan Rudy.
imprint
Waterloo : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2005.
description
xvii, 290 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0889204306
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Waterloo : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2005.
isbn
0889204306
restrictions
Online version licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
5106410
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-279) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-04-01:
Butling (emer., Albert College of Art & Design) and Rudy (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta) fittingly echo the unconventionality of their subject by structuring their book as alternating essays on key poets, magazines, and festivals that made Canada a Mecca for experimental poetry in the second half of the 20th century. Framing the essays are two useful, detailed chronologies and a well-informed bibliography. Butling and Rudy trace the emergence of a distinctive Canadian movement (though one influenced by American Beat and Black Mountain poetics) supported by Vancouver's Tish magazine and Toronto's Coach House Press. After presenting a solid historiographical critique emphasizing gender, racial, and imperial biases entrenched within avant-gardism, the authors chronicle the redefining of poetic community in recent decades by women and poets of color, especially First Nations poets. Balancing the book's theoretical perspective are interviews with many poets, one of whom is Butling. In an autobiographical essay titled "Who Is She?" Butling offers two competing narratives about her role in the Vancouver poetry scene (and its famed 1963 poetry conference), her growing feminist consciousness in the decades that followed, and her struggle to carve out a scholarly identity separate from her role as a poet's wife. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. J. F. Roche Rochester Institute of Technology
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A necessary book, Writing in Our Time thoroughly explores the lateral shoots and adventitious roots of English Canadas most exciting poetry and its contexts." -- Douglas Barbour, University of Alberta.
"an essential guide to a half century of Canadian innovative poetry...along with lucid introductions to a set of writers who have revolutionized the theory and practice of poetry." -- Charles Bernstein, University of Pennsylvania.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2006
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Summaries
Main Description
Process poetics is about radical poetry - poetry that challenges dominant world views, values, and aesthetic practices with its use of unconventional punctuation, interrupted syntax, variable subject positions, repetition, fragmentation, and disjunction. To trace the aesthetically and politically radical poetries in English Canada since the 1960s, Pauline Butling and Susan Rudy begin with the "upstart" poets published in Vancouver's TISH: A Poetry Newsletter , and follow the trajectory of process poetics in its national and international manifestations through the 1980s and '90s. The poetics explored include the works of Nicole Brossard, Daphne Martlatt, bpNichol, George Bowering, Roy Kiyooka, and Frank Davey in the 1960s and '70s. For the 1980-2000 period, the authors include essays on Jeff Derksen, Clare Harris, Erin Mour, and Lisa Robertson. They also look at books by older authors published after 1979, including Robin Blaser, Robert Kroetsch, and Fred Wah. A historiography of the radical poets, and a roster of the little magazines, small press publishers, literary festivals, and other such sites that have sustained poetic experimentation, provide context.
Main Description
Process poetics is about radical poetry - poetry that challenges dominant world views, values, and aesthetic practices with its use of unconventional punctuation, interrupted syntax, variable subject positions, repetition, fragmentation, and disjunction. To trace the aesthetically and politically radical poetries in English Canada since the 1960s, Pauline Butling and Susan Rudy begin with the "upstart" poets published in Vancouver's TISH: A Poetry Newsletter, and follow the trajectory of process poetics in its national and international manifestations through the 1980s and '90s. The poetics explored include the works of Nicole Brossard, Daphne Martlatt, bp Nichol, George Bowering, Roy Kiyooka, and Frank Davey in the 1960s and '70s. For the 1980-2000 period, the authors include essays on Jeff Derksen, Clare Harris, Erin Mour, and Lisa Robertson. They also look at books by older authors published after 1979, including Robin Blaser, Robert Kroetsch, and Fred Wah.
Table of Contents
Preface
(Re)defining radical poeticsp. 17
One potato, two potato, three potato, four : poetry, publishing, politics, and communitiesp. 29
TISH : "the problem of margins"p. 49
bpNichol and a gift economy : "the play of a value and the value of play"p. 61
"I know that all has not been said" : Nicole Brossard in Englishp. 79
Poetry and landscape, more than meets the eye : Roy Kiyooka, Frank Davey, Daphne Marlatt, and George Boweringp. 89
Fred Wah - amongp. 103
"The desperate love story that poetry is" : Robert Kroetsch's The hornbooks of Rita Kp. 115
"Who is she?" : inside/outside literary communitiesp. 141
"What there is teasing beyond the edges" : Claire Harris's liminal autobiographyp. 161
Robin Blaser's "thousand and one celebrations"p. 171
"From radical to integral" : Daphne Marlatt's "booking passage"p. 185
"But is it politics?" : Jeff Derksen's "rearticulatory poetics"p. 195
"What can atmosphere with / vocabularies delight?" : excessively reading Erin Mourep. 205
The weather project : Lisa Robertson's poetics of "soft architecture"p. 217
Literary activism : changing the garde : 1990s editing and publishingp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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