Frontier contact between choson Korea and Tokugawa Japan /
James B. Lewis.
imprint
London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2003.
description
xiii, 322 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0700713018 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2003.
isbn
0700713018 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5045156
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Working from Japanese and Korean archives, the author has painstakingly amassed a detailed picture of the early modern Tsushima-Pusan frontier, encompassing Kyongsang Province, Tsushima Island, and the waters in between....All told, "Frontier Contact offers a series of "discrete closeups of an important borderland that most Japanese historians have hitherto glimpsed only from a distance. Lewis's research into Korean views of the Japanese proves particularly revealing. Unusually well supplied with maps, tables, appendices, and a trilingual glossary, "and fairly bristling throughout with archival detail, the book offers a rich empirical feast." -"Journal of Japanese Studies
'Dr Lewis writes with ease and clarity. I appreciate the way he gently reminds the reader from time to time of earlier points of importance, thus saving a good deal of backward foraging. This book is pleasant to handle and the typeface easy on the eye.'- Keith Pratt, British Association for Korean Studies ' By revealing in such detail and with such erudition the myriad complexities of Korean-Japanese relations as they worked on the ground, Lewis's book shows how far the field has come since the myth of Tokugawa Japan's isolation began to unravel a quarter century ago.'- Monumenta Nipponica
'Dr Lewis writes with ease and clarity. I appreciate the way he gently reminds the reader from time to time of earlier points of importance, thus saving a good deal of backward foraging. This book is pleasant to handle and the typeface easy on the eye.' - Keith Pratt, British Association for Korean Studies ' By revealing in such detail and with such erudition the myriad complexities of Korean-Japanese relations as they worked on the ground, Lewis's book shows how far the field has come since the myth of Tokugawa Japan's isolation began to unravel a quarter century ago.' - Monumenta Nipponica
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Focusing on the period 1600-1900, this work examines Korean and Japanese attitudes towards each other forged at their point of contact on the frontier.
Back Cover Copy
East Asia from 1400 to 1850 was a vibrant web of connections, and the southern coast of the Korean peninsula participated in a maritime world that stretched to Southeast Asia and beyond. Within this world were Japanese pirates, traders, and fishermen. They brought things to the Korean peninsula and they took things away. The economic and demographic structures of Kyongsang Province had deep and wide connections with these Japanese traders. Social and political clashes revolving around the Japan House in Pusan reveal Korean mentalities towards the Japanese connection. This study seeks to define 'Korea' by examining its frontier with Japan. The guiding problems are the relations between structures and agents and the self-definitions reached by pre-modern Koreans in their interaction with the Japanese. Case studies range from demography to taxation to trade to politics to prostitution. The study draws on a wide base of primary sources for Korea and Japan and introduces the problems that animate modern scholarship in both countries. It offers a model approach for Korea's northern frontier with China and shows that the peninsula was and is a complex brocade of differing regions. The book will be of interest to anyone concerned with pre-1900 East Asia, Korea in particular, and especially Korea's relations with the outside world. Anyone interested in early-modern Japan and its external relations will also find it essential reading.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The historical and geographical theatre of operations
Money: functions and costs of local and national envoys
Elites: Korean images of the Japanese and Japanese images of the Koreans
Politics: Tongnae as a dangerous appointment
Violence: the riot as a Japanese negotiating tactic
Sex: prostitution and the struggle for power and authority at the Japan
House Property: thievery as a capital offense or a mildly offensive act
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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