A history of modern computing /
Paul E. Ceruzzi.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2003.
description
xi, 445 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0262532034 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2003.
isbn
0262532034 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4828696
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [415]-430) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paul E. Ceruzzi is Curator of Aerospace Electronics and Computing at the National Air and Space Museum.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-11-01:
The history of computing is not finished yet, but Ceruzzi (National Air and Space Museum) acknowledges this and presents a well-told story. This very readable account of computers and computing from about 1945 to 2001 starts with the ENIAC and UNIVAC computers, and ends with the open source movement. The author effectively works facts and technical ideas into a narrative that clearly portrays the trends in computing. There is a focus on commercially sold computers and the companies that made them, rather than on particular applications of computers such as in artificial intelligence or financial systems. Several dozen black-and-white photos and diagrams show many of the people and computers involved in launching new computers or software. For the scholar, notes to the text and more than 200 references are included, as is a detailed index. This second edition (1st ed., CH, Apr'99) adds material of the period 1995-2001, including the Microsoft antitrust case, the dot-com crash, and the open source movement. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. S. L. Tanimoto University of Washington
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-05-15:
Published in 1998, the first edition of this history took readers from the development of the first electronic digital computer to the advent of the World Wide Web. Several significant developments have happened since then, and in this edition Ceruzzi, curator of Aerospace Electronics and Computing at the National Air and Space Museum, has added a new chapter in which he examines three of them at length. They are the Microsoft antitrust suit and subsequent trial, the ascent and crash of the dot-com companies, and the rise of the "open source" software movement, particularly the growth and acceptance of the Linux operating system. Ceruzzi maintains a chronological narrative to represent several major turning points in computing history, including the transformation of the computer in the late 1940s from a specialized scientific instrument to a commercial product, the emergence of small systems in the late 1960s, the beginnings of personal computing in the 1970s, and the spread of networking after 1985. His last chapter, "Internet Time, 1995-2001," covers the recent developments mentioned above. With an engaging style, Ceruzzi breathes life into what is usually perceived as a mundane topic. Recommended to a broad audience, especially where there is demand for such historical treatments.-Joe J. Accardi, Harper Coll. Lib., Palatine, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A good addition to any collection of computer history books." Michael Swaine Dr. Dobb's Journal
"A History of Modern Computing is a monumental achievement." Cal Clinchard PC Today
"The author does a great job in making this volume an enjoyable learning experience." Gary E. Watts Science Books & Film
"A good addition to any collection of computer history books." - Michael Swaine , Dr. Dobb's Journal
"A good addition to any collection of computer history books." - Michael Swaine, Dr. Dobb's Journal
"A History of Modern Computing is a monumental achievement." - Cal Clinchard , PC Today
"A History of Modern Computing is a monumental achievement." - Cal Clinchard, PC Today
"The author does a great job in making this volume an enjoyable learning experience." - Gary E. Watts , Science Books & Film
"The author does a great job in making this volume an enjoyable learning experience." - Gary E. Watts, Science Books & Film
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2003
Choice, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This overview of modern computing takes the reader from the development of the first electronic digital computer through to the advent of the World Wide Web. The author balances stories of individuals with those of institutions.
Main Description
This engaging history covers modern computing from the development of the first electronic digital computer through the dot-com crash. The author concentrates on five key moments of transition: the transformation of the computer in the late 1940s from a specialized scientific instrument to a commercial product; the emergence of small systems in the late 1960s; the beginning of personal computing in the 1970s; the spread of networking after 1985; and, in a chapter written for this edition, the period 1995-2001. The new material focuses on the Microsoft antitrust suit, the rise and fall of the dot-coms, and the advent of open source software, particularly Linux. Within the chronological narrative, the book traces several overlapping threads: the evolution of the computer's internal design; the effect of economic trends and the Cold War; the long-term role of IBM as a player and as a target for upstart entrepreneurs; the growth of software from a hidden element to a major character in the story of computing; and the recurring issue of the place of information and computing in a democratic society. The focus is on the United States (though Europe and Japan enter the story at crucial points), on computing per se rather than on applications such as artificial intelligence, and on systems that were sold commercially and installed in quantities.
Main Description
This engaging history covers modern computing from the development of the first electronic digital computer through the dot-com crash. The author concentrates on five key moments of transition: the transformation of the computer in the late 1940s from a specialized scientific instrument to a commercial product; the emergence of small systems in the late 1960s; the beginning of personal computing in the 1970s; the spread of networking after 1985; and, in a chapter written for this edition, the period 1995-2001. The new material focuses on the Microsoft antitrust suit, the rise and fall of the dot-coms, and the advent of open source software, particularly Linux.Within the chronological narrative, the book traces several overlapping threads: the evolution of the computer's internal design; the effect of economic trends and the Cold War; the long-term role of IBM as a player and as a target for upstart entrepreneurs; the growth of software from a hidden element to a major character in the story of computing; and the recurring issue of the place of information and computing in a democratic society. The focus is on the United States (though Europe and Japan enter the story at crucial points), on computing per se rather than on applications such as artificial intelligence, and on systems that were sold commercially and installed in quantities.
Table of Contents
Dedicationp. v
Preface to the Second Editionp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction: Defining "Computer"p. 1
The Advent of Commercial Computing, 1945-1956p. 13
Computing Comes of Age, 1956-1964p. 47
The Early History of Software, 1952-1968p. 79
From Mainframe to Minicomputer, 1959-1969p. 109
The "Go-Go" Years and the System/360, 1961-1975p. 143
The Chip and Its Impact, 1965-1975p. 177
The Personal Computer, 1972-1977p. 207
Augmenting Human Intellect, 1975-1985p. 243
Workstations, UNIX, and the Net, 1981-1995p. 281
"Internet Time," 1995-2001p. 307
Conclusion: The Digitization of the World Picturep. 345
Notesp. 351
Bibliographyp. 415
Indexp. 431
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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