From airline reservations to Sonic the Hedgehog : a history of the software industry /
Martin Campbell-Kelly.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2003.
description
xiv, 372 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0262033038 (hc. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2003.
isbn
0262033038 (hc. : alk. paper)
local note
SCAR copy: first MIT Press paperback edition, 2004.
catalogue key
4803374
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [349]-359) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Martin Campbell-Kelly is Reader in Computer Science at the University of Warwick.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-10-01:
Campbell-Kelly (Univ. of Warwick, UK) has written an excellent book on the history of the software industry, which has evolved into the fourth-largest industrial sector of the US economy. He tells the story of three types of firms--software contractors, producers of corporate software packages, and makers of mass-market products--focusing on the products they developed, the business models they followed, and the markets they served. In the 1950s, software contractors wrote one-of-a-kind programs for corporate or government customers; these programs were usually hugely expensive, with $1 million in expenses not atypical. Software corporate products emerged in the 1960s following the launch of the IBM System/360 computer family; these products were typically priced between $5,000 and $100,000. Finally, with the arrival of the personal computer in the late 1970s came mass-market software, typically priced between $100 and $500 and sold in large volumes, often several hundred thousand copies. Entertainment software was a major subsection of the mass-market software industry. The book contributes structure and content, along with insight and analysis, to document the history of the software industry. For all computing students and professionals. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General readers; upper-division undergraduates through professionals. C. Tappert Pace University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2003-02-15:
Campbell-Kelly (computer science, Univ. of Warwick, U.K.) presents a balanced history of the software industry from the 1950s to 1995. Dividing the business into three sectors (software contracting, corporate software precuts, and mass-market software products), he examines the key products and players in each. There is an interval of about a decade from one sector to the next, and the book follows the chronological time line of software development. Major software manufacturers of the past and present are discussed, as are their business models. The author concludes with some observations on what makes the U.S. software industry so powerful and profitable. Many years of research went into this volume, and the text is well supplemented with industry data such as sales figures, the classification of software titles, flowcharts, and advertisements for products. The result is a well-rounded look at the software industry from a business perspective. Including extensive chapter notes, this book is highly recommended for academic and larger public libraries.-Colleen Cuddy, NYU Sch. of Medicine (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Campbell-Kelly is the first historian to give us a comprehensive overview of this hidden industry..." - David Siegfried, Booklist
"Campbell-Kelly is the first historian to map the terrain of the software industry, from contractors through corporate products to personal computer software. This pathbreaking book is packed with data and insights that will be valuable to historians of business and technology, as well as to analysts of the contemporary software industry. It lays to rest a variety of myths and distortions about the software business, including the over-emphasis on Microsoft that has dominated writing about it to this time." -JoAnne Yates, Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management, MIT
"I strongly recommend this book..." - Paul Ceruzzi, The Times Higher Education Supplement
"This book is a major step forward in documenting the software industry's history. It contributes structure and content as well as insight and analysis." -Burton Grad, President, Software History Center
&"This book is a major step forward in documenting the software industry's history. It contributes structure and content as well as insight and analysis.&" &-Burton Grad, President, Software History Center
"This book presents an exceptionally clearheaded overview of one of the most important industries of the twentieth century. No other work covers the business dimensions of the software industry so comprehensively or so clearly. It should be the starting point for anyone interested in the history of the software business." -Steven Usselman, School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Institute of Technology
&"This book presents an exceptionally clearheaded overview of one of the most important industries of the twentieth century. No other work covers the business dimensions of the software industry so comprehensively or so clearly. It should be the starting point for anyone interested in the history of the software business.&" &-Steven Usselman, School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Institute of Technology
"Campbell-Kelly is the first historian to map the terrain of the software industry, from contractors through corporate products to personal computer software. This pathbreaking book is packed with data and insights that will be valuable to historians of business and technology, as well as analysts of the contemporary software industry. It lays to rest a variety of myths and distortions about the software business, including the over-emphasis on Microsoft that has dominated writing about it to this time."--JoAnne Yates, Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management, MIT
"A valuable long view of...the high-visibility Silicon Valley stock-market bubble." - Steven Poole, The Guardian
"From a disparate array of sources, Campbell-Kelly deftly and neatly teases out a compelling history of the emergence, structure, and development of the computer software and services sector of the US economy."--Arthur Norberg, Director, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota
"This book is a major step forward in documenting the software industry's history. It contributes structure and content as well as insight and analysis."--Burton Grad, President, Software History CenterPlease note: Endorser has a slightly different title.
"This book presents an exceptionally clearheaded overview of one of the most important industries of the twentieth century. No other work covers the business dimensions of the software industry so comprehensively or so clearly. It should be the starting point for anyone interested in the history of the software business."--Steven Usselman, School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Institute of Technology
"In his incisive, panoramic book... Martin Campbell-Kelly delivers all three: context, insight, even occasional humor." - Steve Lohr , The New York Times
"In his incisive, panoramic book... Martin Campbell-Kelly delivers all three: context, insight, even occasional humor." - Steve Lohr, The New York Times
"I strongly recommend this book..." - Paul Ceruzzi , The Times Higher Education Supplement
"Campbell-Kelly is the first historian to give us a comprehensive overview of this hidden industry..." David Siegfried Booklist
"From Airline Reservations to Sonic the Hedgehog should command a wide audience..." Slashdot.org
"In his incisive, panoramic book... Martin Campbell-Kelly delivers all three: context, insight, even occasional humor." Steve Lohr The New York Times
"In his incisive, panoramic book...Martin Campbell-Kelly delivers...context, insight, even occasional humor." Steve Lohr The New York Times
"I strongly recommend this book..." Paul Ceruzzi Paul Ceruzzi
"I strongly recommend this book..." Paul Ceruzzi The Times Higher Education Supplement
"...Provides a smooth, very readable ride through the growth of one of the last half century's most important industries." Cal Clinchard PC Today
"...a crucial document for anyone interested in understanding the history of software from a business perspective." - Case , firstmonday.org
"...a crucial document for anyone interested in understanding the history of software from a business perspective." - Case, firstmonday.org
"A timely reminder of earlier booms and busts..." - Barry Fox , New Scientist
&"Campbell-Kelly is the first historian to map the terrain of the software industry, from contractors through corporate products to personal computer software. This pathbreaking book is packed with data and insights that will be valuable to historians of business and technology, as well as to analysts of the contemporary software industry. It lays to rest a variety of myths and distortions about the software business, including the over-emphasis on Microsoft that has dominated writing about it to this time.&" &-JoAnne Yates, Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management, MIT
"From a disparate array of sources, Campbell-Kelly deftly and neatly teases out a compelling history of the emergence, structure, and development of the computer software and services sector of the US economy." -Arthur Norberg, Director, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota
"From Airline Reservations to Sonic the Hedgehog should command a wide audience..." - Slashdot.org
&"From a disparate array of sources, Campbell-Kelly deftly and neatly teases out a compelling history of the emergence, structure, and development of the computer software and services sector of the US economy.&" &-Arthur Norberg, Director, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota
"A well-rounded look at the software industry from a business perspective. Highly recommended." - Colleen Cuddy, Library Journal
"Campbell-Kelly is the first historian to give us a comprehensive overview of this hidden industry..." - David Siegfried , Booklist
"...a crucial document for anyone interested in understanding the history of software from a business perspective." Case firstmonday.org
"A timely reminder of earlier booms and busts..." Barry Fox New Scientist
"A timely reminder of earlier booms and busts..." - Barry Fox, New Scientist
"A valuable long view of...the high-visibility Silicon Valley stock-market bubble." - Steven Poole , The Guardian
"A valuable long view of...the high-visibility Silicon Valley stock-market bubble." Steven Poole The Guardian
"A valuable long view of what is...the high-visibility Silicon Valley stock-market bubble." Steven Poole The Guardian
"A well-rounded look at the software industry from a business perspective. Highly recommended." Colleen Cuddy Library Journal
"A well-rounded look at the software industry from a business perspective. Highly recommended." - Colleen Cuddy , Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, February 2003
Booklist, March 2003
Choice, October 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
From its first glimmerings in the 1950s, the software industry has evolved to become the fourth largest industrial sector of the US economy. Starting with a handful of software contractors who produced specialized programs for the few existing machines, the industry grew to include producers of corporate software packages and then makers of mass-market products and recreational software. This book tells the story of each of these types of firm, focusing on the products they developed, the business models they followed, and the markets they served.By describing the breadth of this industry, Martin Campbell-Kelly corrects the popular misconception that one firm is at the center of the software universe. He also tells the story of lucrative software products such as IBM's CICS and SAP's R/3, which, though little known to the general public, lie at the heart of today's information infrastructure.With its wealth of industry data and its thoughtful judgments, this book will become a starting point for all future investigations of this fundamental component of computer history.
Main Description
From its first glimmerings in the 1950s, the software industry has evolved to become the fourth largest industrial sector of the US economy. Starting with a handful of software contractors who produced specialized programs for the few existing machines, the industry grew to include producers of corporate software packages and then makers of mass-market products and recreational software. This book tells the story of each of these types of firm, focusing on the products they developed, the business models they followed, and the markets they served. By describing the breadth of this industry, Martin Campbell-Kelly corrects the popular misconception that one firm is at the center of the software universe. He also tells the story of lucrative software products such as IBM's CICS and SAP's R/3, which, though little known to the general public, lie at the heart of today's information infrastructure. With its wealth of industry data and its thoughtful judgments, this book will become a starting point for all future investigations of this fundamental component of computer history.
Main Description
Awarded the 2003 American Association for History and Computing Book Prize presented by the American Association for History and Computing (AAHC). From its first glimmerings in the 1950s, the software industry has evolved to become the fourth largest industrial sector of the US economy. Starting with a handful of software contractors who produced specialized programs for the few existing machines, the industry grew to include producers of corporate software packages and then makers of mass-market products and recreational software. This book tells the story of each of these types of firm, focusing on the products they developed, the business models they followed, and the markets they served. By describing the breadth of this industry, Martin Campbell-Kelly corrects the popular misconception that one firm is at the center of the software universe. He also tells the story of lucrative software products such as IBM's CICS and SAP's R/3, which, though little known to the general public, lie at the heart of today's information infrastructure. With its wealth of industry data and its thoughtful judgments, this book will become a starting point for all future investigations of this fundamental component of computer history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Starting with a handful of software contractors, the software industry grew to include producers of corporate software packages and makers of mass-market products and recreational software. This is the story of each of these types of firm, focusing on their products, business models and market.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
The Software Industryp. 1
Origins of the Software Contractor, the 1950sp. 29
Programming Services, the 1960sp. 57
Origins of the Software Products Industry, 1965-1970p. 89
The Shaping of the Software Products Industry, the 1970sp. 121
The Maturing of the Corporate Software Products Industry, 1980-1995p. 165
Early Development of the Personal Computer Software Industry, 1975-1983p. 201
Not Only Microsoft: The Maturing of the Personal Computer Software Industry, 1983-1995p. 231
Home and Recreational Softwarep. 269
Reflections on the Success of the US Software Industryp. 303
Notesp. 313
Sources of Chapter Frontispiecesp. 347
Bibliographyp. 349
Indexp. 361
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem