Animal traditions : behavioural inheritance in evoloution /
Eytan Avital and Eva Jablonka.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
description
xii, 432 p.
ISBN
0521662737
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2000.
isbn
0521662737
catalogue key
4161844
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-09-01:
Evolution proceeds because of heritable variation among individuals in a population; these variations ultimately lead to differential reproductive success. Differential reproduction may in turn modify the proportions of individuals with different characteristics. The genetic makeups of individuals and populations are generally considered the bases of evolution by natural selection. Avital (David Yellin College of Education, Jerusalem) and Jablonka (Tel-Aviv Univ.) argue, however, that variable nongenetic information may also be transmitted, may evolve, and may affect the evolution of genetically determined characters. They conclude that socially learned behavior, parental, and alloparental care of young, and even conflict lead to "social speciation" and ultimately reproductive isolation (at least in birds and mammals; they devote almost no discussion to other organisms even though social interaction is far more taxonomically widespread). The authors also argue that genetic variation is discreet and therefore finite but behavioral variation is effectively unlimited; actually, genetically based evolution is also effectively unlimited. Furthermore, genetic evolution proceeds even in species or situations where little or no social interaction occurs. Therefore, the scope and role of social learning in the overall context of evolution is unclear, but this well-written book is certain to fuel an interesting debate in evolutionary science. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. S. Grace Florida Institute of Technology
Reviews
Review Quotes
‘This is a timely and thorough account of a neglected field, and will provide fascination and interest to any biologist whose horizons extend beyond the merely molecular.’Dennis Cotton, Biologist
"...Animal Traditions is an important book, for it shows that there are more possible (and plausible) explanations for the evolution of animal behaviours than people with a gene-centric view of inheritance are able to consider. So every person interested in evolutionary biology and psychology should read it." Biology and Philosophy
"Animal Traditions provides a well-written, handsomely bound, multiply indexed, though idiosyncratic, introduction to behavioural ecology...They provide a wealth of references to material consistent with their view." Ethology 2001
‘… this well-written book is certain to fuel an interesting debate in evolutionary science.’Choice
'This is a timely and thorough account of a neglected field, and will provide fascination and interest to any biologist whose horizons extend beyond the merely molecular.' Dennis Cotton, Biologist
'This is a timely and thorough account of a neglected field, and will provide fascination and interest to any biologist whose horizons extend beyond the merely molecular.'Dennis Cotton, Biologist
'... this well-written book is certain to fuel an interesting debate in evolutionary science.' Choice
'... this well-written book is certain to fuel an interesting debate in evolutionary science.'Choice
"full of natural history that is fun and interesting to read." SCIENCE July 2001
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Animal Traditions maintains that the assumption that the selection of genes supplies both a sufficient explanation of the evolution and a true description of its course is, despite its almost universal acclaim, wrong. Eytan Avital and Eva Jablonka contend that evolutionary explanations must take into account the well-established fact that in mammals and birds, the transfer of learnt information is both ubiquitous and indispensable. The introduction of the behavioural inheritance system into the Darwinian explanatory scheme enables the authors to offer new interpretations for common behaviours such as maternal behaviours, behavioural conflicts within families, adoption and helping. This approach offers a richer view of heredity and evolution, integrates developmental and evolutionary processes, suggests new lines for research, and provides a constructive alternative to both the selfish gene and meme views of the world. It will make stimulating reading for all those interested in evolutionary biology, sociobiology, behavioural ecology and psychology.
Main Description
Despite its almost universal acclaim, the authors contend that evolutionary explanations must take into account the well-established fact that in mammals and birds, the transfer of learned information is both ubiquitous and indispensable. Animal Traditions maintains the assumption that selection of genes supplies both a sufficient explanation of evolution and a true description of its course. The introduction of the behavioral inheritance system into the Darwinian explanatory scheme enables the authors to offer new interpretations for common behaviors such as maternal behaviors, behavioral conflicts within families, adoption, and helping. This approach offers a richer view of heredity and evolution, integrates developmental and evolutionary processes, suggests new lines for research, and provides a constructive alternative to both the selfish gene and meme views of the world. This book will make stimulating reading for all those interested in evolutionary biology, sociobiology, behavioral ecology, and psychology.
Description for Bookstore
Animal Traditions offers an alternative to both the 'selfish gene' and 'meme' views of the world for all evolutionary biologists. By showing how cultural traditions, imparting information from one generation to the next, are vital to birds and mammals, it offers a unified evolutionary and developmental perspective of animal behaviour.
Description for Library
Animal Traditions introduces the behavioural inheritance system into existing evolutionary theory, offering new interpretations of behaviours such as adoption, maternal behaviour and helping. Describing the variety and importance in evolution of the cultural traditions of birds and mammals, it shows how our understanding of behavioural evolution is enriched by considering how the system of passing on information from one generation to the next works. Although firmly set within the Darwinian framework, it offers alternatives to both the 'selfish gene' and 'meme' views of the world for all evolutionary biologists.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text argues that evolutionary explanations must take into account not only the selection of genes, but also the fact that in mammals and birds, the transfer of learnt information is both ubiquitous and indispensable.
Description for Bookstore
Animal Traditions offers an alternative to both the ‘selfish gene’ and ‘meme’ views of the world for all evolutionary biologists. By showing how cultural traditions, imparting information from one generation to the next, are vital to birds and mammals, it offers a unified evolutionary and developmental perspective of animal behaviour.
Table of Contents
Preface
New rules for old games
What is pulling the strings of behaviour?
Learning and the behavioural inheritance system
Parental care - the highroad to family traditions
Achieving harmony between mates - the learning route
Parents and offspring - too much conflict?
Alloparental care - an additional channel of information transfer
The origins and persistence of group legacies
Darwin meets Lamarck - the co-evolution of genes and learning
The free phenotype
References
Species index
Subject index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem